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Piret Tõnurist - Systems change: how to get started and keep going?

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Piret Tõnurist from OECD's OPSI visited Sitra Lab's HERÄÄMÖ XL breakfast event on 21.11.2019.

Piret Tõnurist, an Estonian, works for the OECD’s Observatory for Public Sector Innovation (OPSI) where she promotes practical approaches in Systems Thinking and Anticipatory Innovation Governance. Piret works internationally with public-sector partners on these topics.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Piret Tõnurist - Systems change: how to get started and keep going?

  1. 1. o e . c d / o p s i @ O P S I g o v H ERÄÄMÖ X L P I R E T TÕ N U R I S T H e l s i n k i , 2 1 N o v e m b e r 2 0 1 9 @piret.tonurist
  2. 2. KNOWING AND ‘KNOWING’Everyone knows that systemic change is needed, but they don’t really know until their feet are wet… and they get used to having their feet wet fast.
  3. 3. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATIONNEED FOR INNOVATION Making the case beyond the need for systemic change… Source: unsplash.com Source: abc.net.au
  4. 4. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATIONWHAT IS GOVERNMENT’S JOB? Change is your job!
  5. 5. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION Systems thinking, strategic design, logic modelling, and challenges and prizesLean, business process improvement, service blueprinting, quality control, and behavioural insights Horizon scanning, weak signal detection strategic foresight, futures thinking, speculative design, regulatory sandboxes, and longer-term structured discovery- based challengesPositive deviance, co-creation, human-centred design, exploration of edge cases, and ideas management systems And you need different tools to do it PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION #ToolkitNavigator
  6. 6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2S-S8cO5_k&t=5s
  7. 7. KNOWING AND ‘DOING’ Knowing and analysing systemic problems is very different than then doing something systematically about them..
  8. 8. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION I n d i v i d u a l , o r g a n i z a t i o n a l a n d s y s t e m i c f a c t o r s i n f l u e n c i n g p o l i c y s u c c e s s Factors influencing the DSGs in their main roles in Estonia Individual Organizational Systemic Budgeting rules Consensus on narrative & ToC Public scrutiny and participation in public life Time management Buy-in Network management Trade-off management Collaboration Competing roles CharismaPersonal characteristics & capabilities Contextual factors and crises Silos & fragmentation Functional levels Lackofstructuralleavers Lack of mandate Political interest & planning cycles Network span Closeness to end users & implementation Evidence base Legacy systems and layered policies Money Incentives Leadership style Strategies & goals New topics Culture Adopted processes: agile and iterative development Strong mission sense Problem ownership Solutionism Selling ideas Overarching vision abstraction Decentralised decision- making Blame game Flat hierarchies Flexibility to compose teams & capacity Underestimating complexity Lack of mandate Complexity paralysis
  9. 9. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION IMPLEMENTATION OF SYSTEM CHANGE IN GOVERNMENT M A K I N G P U B L I C P R O C U R E M E N T E F F E C T I V E I N S L O V E N I A THE OBSERVATORY OF PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION PREMISE OF THE PROJECT ▪ Effective procurement does not depend solely on digital platforms ▪ The capacities inside and also outside the public sector play a role ▪ Human behaviour and perception of corruption can be very important determinants of success ▪ The project will examine these and any other systemic challenges to effective procurement in Slovenia and propose systemic solutions for the issues identified BEHAVIORAL BIASES PERCEPTION OF CORRUPTION TECHNOLOGY (DIGITAL) CAPACITY CAPACITY OF PRIVATE PARTNERS EXPERIENCE WITH ITERATIVE/AGILE DEVELOPMENT SECOTAL FACTORS RISK CULTURE ACCOUNTABILITY STRUCTURE ▪ The Observatory of Public Sector Innovation (OPSI) will apply systems thinking to analyse the main systemic barriers and challenges to effective procurement in Slovenia ▪ The project is funded by the EC through the Structural Reform Support Programme
  10. 10. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION FINDINGS TAKAWAYS FROM THE INTERVIEWS LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE Defining a common purpose
  11. 11. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION Problem ladder for systems thinking Team: Designed by the OECD Observatory of Public Sector Innovation 2019 Version 1.0 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) REASONS Why might we want to…? Test script: If we…would it help us…? BARRIERS Why can’t we…? Test script: Is one thing blocking us from…that we have not yet…? BROAD NARROW Start here Step 5: Final problem statement Step 1: Start with the initial problem statement presented to your group. Most of the broader components of the challenge have already been discussed, but add others if you think they are missing. The goal of this activity will be to narrow the focus. Step 2: As a group, build your problem ladder. Some initial boxes have been added to get you started. To narrow your problem, ask “Why can’t we [original barrier]”? Rephrase the answer into a “How might we…” question and add it below the starting point. Step 3: Ask “why else”? Add that answer left or right of the one you added in Step 2. Step 4: Either continue adding barriers based on the starting point OR ladder up or down using the question prompts on the left. Try to narrow the focus as much as you can until you get to more actionable “How might we…” statements. Draw lines to connect related problem statements to the ones above or below it. Step 5: Once you have built your problem ladder, choose the problem statement that you would like to use for generating ideas in the next activity.
  12. 12. POWERFUL FEELING POWERLESS The most powerful people in government and outside of it feel surprisingly powerless as problems are not directly within their control, under their mandate. They lack efficacy: the belief and ability that they can produce the desired result.
  13. 13. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATIONPUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION MODEL I Factors influencing change INDIVIDUAL, ORGANISATIONAL AND SYSTEM LEVELS
  14. 14. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE December 2017 in Helsinki A SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION
  15. 15. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION OUR JOURNEY LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE
  16. 16. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION OPSI SKILLS AND LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE WE HAVE QUITE A LOT OF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT SYSTEMS THINKING METHODS, BUT WE ARE PRAGMATIC ABOUT IT… A SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION
  17. 17. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION The evolutions towards a multi-method approach. Cybernetics Norbert Wiener General systems theory 1st order cybernetics Ashby Dynamic systems theory Forrester Emergence of complexity science Emergence of chaos theory 2nd order cybernetics Mathematics, biology, phycology Engineering, computing, information technology Family therapy, biology of cognition, experimental epistemology Criticalsystemstheory Use of CLDs, stock flow, dynamic simulation Soft Systems Modelling Methodological pluralism Systems archetypes Meadows Systems processes Seddon Learning organization Senge New science of networks Dynamics in systems Kauffman Visual complexity Multi-level complex systems Network organization LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGEA SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION
  18. 18. Tactics for systems change TO CREATE THE POSSIBILITY TO INITIATE AND CARRY OUT PROJECTS FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR PEOPLE Combining a diverse set of people: “If you know everyone in the room: you will fail” PLACE Creating the neutral space to deliberate and set back from the everyday system DWELLING Creating the time and conditions to think and deliberate on the end purpose CONNECTING Connecting to all stakeholders to both inform the process and form advocacy coalitions FRAMING Framing the issue based on the outcome/purpose (public value) not existing system structures DESIGNING Based on the analysis before, designing solutions that may have systemic effects EXPERIMENTING Reducing uncertainty by experimenting on a smaller scale with different solutions and clear action plans PROTOTYPING Creating a prototype for scale that can be tested by diverse populations STEWARDING Guiding and supporting the process by both creating the resources and political backing for change MEANINGFUL MEASUREMENT Measuring the effects based on the outcomes wanted to achieve, not proxies LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGEA SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION
  19. 19. HOW DO WE WORK? AN EXAMPLE SYNTHESIS 801 observations, quotes and takeaways 22 DSGs plus Strategy director – semi-structured interviews Systematic: focus on individual elements Systemic: focus on the interconnections between a set of elements in relation to their environment 1 2 3 50 trends identified by coding Articulating 7 systemic takeaways Clustering trends: identifying interdependences Synthesis analysis: connections between drivers, resources and outcome.
  20. 20. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION OPSI SKILLS AND LEADERSHIP FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE IT IS NOT ONLY ABOUT ADRESSING WICKED PROBLEMS, BUT BUILDING CAPACITY TO DO IT CONTINUOUSLY A SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION
  21. 21. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATIONA SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION Organisational transformation
  22. 22. REACTIVE GOVERNMENT Position of ‘wait and see’ or called forward when ‘hazards’ (moral, ethical or even physical) materialize. ‘End-of-pipe’ interventions, and often fail to anticipate or address long-term systemic implications PROACTIVE GOVERNMENT Government as a ‘technology maker’ Government anticipating various futures and actively exploring and shaping them in practise. ANTICIPATORY INNOVATION GOVERNANCE Towards transformational, future-oriented change
  23. 23. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION Anticipation is the process of creating knowledge – no matter how tentative or qualified – about the different possible futures. This may include, but is not limited to developing not just scenarios of technological alternatives, but techno-moral (value-based) scenarios of the future (Normann, 2014). Anticipatory governance is the process of acting on a variety of inputs to manage emerging knowledge-based technologies and socio-economic developments while such management is still possible (Guston, 2014). This may involve inputs from variety of governance functions (foresight, engagement, policymaking, funding, regulation etc.) in a coordinated manner. Anticipatory regulation is a function of anticipatory governance which uses regulatory means to create space for sandboxes, demonstrators, testbeds etc. for various technology options to emerge. This requires an iterative development of regulation and standards around an emerging field (Armstrong and Rae, 2017). Anticipatory innovation governance is a broad-based capacity to actively explore options as part of broader anticipatory governance, with a particular aim of spurring on innovations (novel to the context, implemented and value shifting products, services and processes) connected to uncertain futures in the hopes of shaping the former trough the innovative practice (OPSI, 2019). Why do we talk about anticipatory innovation governance? ANTICIPATORY INNOVATION GOVERNANCE
  24. 24. REPLACE WITH TITLE OF THE PRESENTATION ANTICIPATORY INNOVATION FUNDING, LEADERSHIP AND WORKING METHODS AND EVALUATION ON THE CITY LEVEL
  25. 25. o e . c d / o p s i @ O P S I g o v #OECDsys @piret.tonurist Piret.Tonurist@oecd.org Sign up for our newsletter to stay up to date with the most recent OPSI news: https://oecd- opsi.org/sign-up-to-opsis-newsletter/ o p s i @ o e c d . o r g

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