Shorna Broussard Allred<br />Richard Stedman<br />Ashley Dayer<br />Peter Smallidge<br />Assessing the Educational Impact ...
Why Distance Learning?<br /><ul><li>Provide regular, accessible, research-based knowledge for improved sustainable management
Serve an audience constrained by time or geography
Provide a vehicle for Forest Science to Become Forest Practice</li></li></ul><li>Attitudes Towards On-line Education<br />...
Efficacy of Distance Learning <br />Distance learning that offers a high level of interaction is more effective than dista...
Advantages<br />Disadvantages<br /><ul><li>Flexible instructional hours
No need to travel
Cost-effectiveness
Ability to share ideas with others not from the participant’s area
Access to current information</li></ul>Lippertet al. 1998, 1999, 2000<br />Inability to interact face-to-face with instruc...
Rationale for Current Study<br />Lack of empirical evaluations of on-line distance learning impacts in the forestry educat...
Sustainable Forestry Principles<br />Contribute to the Conservation of Biological Diversity of the Forest and the Landscap...
Research Objectives<br />1) Determine baseline levels of awareness in relation to specific webinar topics and general sust...
Research Methodology<br />Design and implement a 6-part Webinar Series on Sustainable Forestry (as part of ForestConnect s...
Study Measures<br />Awareness<br />Self-assessments of awareness related to webinar topics<br />Feel informed about___<br ...
Study Measures<br />Behavior<br />Information-seeking<br />Gather more information on the topic<br />Explore resources fro...
Study Measures<br /><ul><li>Behavior
Woodland Management Activities
Create or change management plan
Conduct inventory
Adopt or change practice related to harvest
Adopt or change practice related to overall forest management
Adopt or change practice related to soil or water management
Engage in collaboration with adjacent landowners
Work more with family on family forest planning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Assessing the Educational Impact of the Sustainable Woodlands Webinar Series

326 views

Published on

This presentation focuses on education evaluation research on forestry webinars. This presentation was given at the NY Society of American Foresters Conference, January 2010, Syracuse, NY.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
326
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Clarify for the audience the distinction of awareness versus knowledge.
  • Very good slide.
  • I assume the 33% female is across all categories? What is the % for just owners and how does that compare to the % female that are owners and that attend other types of educational events?
  • I thought you were considering moving this slide to the beginning of the results section. It’s your call and maybe it fits better here. I recall we discussed this as a general result related to the overall mission of the Sustainable Forests Partnership. I think it is meaningful that at least 65% of respondents indicated some increased likelihood of change in activities related to SFP. This is an important consideration for policy makers to note the power of education to enhance the adoption of policy initiatives.
  • You might confirm or not that these patterns were consistent for all categories of participants.
  • It looks like the fifth bar (create/change mgmt plan) should be at the top or the second spot. Also, pursuing woodland certification should be ranked lower on the list. Regarding an interpretation of these results. I don’t recall that any speaker really promoted woodland certification, so the limited intention for change may not be that surprising. The lack of intent to seek legal advice is more surprising because I recall that a central message from Thom was the need to involve an attorney…or maybe I am reading too much between the lines.
  • Assessing the Educational Impact of the Sustainable Woodlands Webinar Series

    1. 1. Shorna Broussard Allred<br />Richard Stedman<br />Ashley Dayer<br />Peter Smallidge<br />Assessing the Educational Impact of the Sustainable Woodlands Webinar Series<br />New York Society of American Foresters Annual Meeting, January 27-29, 2010 Syracuse, NY<br />
    2. 2. Why Distance Learning?<br /><ul><li>Provide regular, accessible, research-based knowledge for improved sustainable management
    3. 3. Serve an audience constrained by time or geography
    4. 4. Provide a vehicle for Forest Science to Become Forest Practice</li></li></ul><li>Attitudes Towards On-line Education<br />In-person natural resource educational programs are a valued and effective mode of education <br />(Jones, Goheen, Dhuyvetter, Kastens & Boadu, 2007)<br />Distance educational via online programs can also be an effective mode of learning and has added benefits of being both cost-effective and convenient (Lippert, Plank, Camberator & Chastain, 1998; Lippert and Plank, 1999; Lippert, Plank & Radhakrishna, 2000; Jones, Goheen, Dhuyvetter, Kastens & Amanor-Boadu, 2007; McCann, 2007). <br />
    5. 5. Efficacy of Distance Learning <br />Distance learning that offers a high level of interaction is more effective than distance learning lacking that element (McCann 2007). <br />Knowledge and skills gained through distance education courses were often applied after the course (Jones et al. 2007). <br />Learning modules offering a high level of interaction and that are rich in multi-media are more effective than those that are not (McCann 2007)<br />
    6. 6. Advantages<br />Disadvantages<br /><ul><li>Flexible instructional hours
    7. 7. No need to travel
    8. 8. Cost-effectiveness
    9. 9. Ability to share ideas with others not from the participant’s area
    10. 10. Access to current information</li></ul>Lippertet al. 1998, 1999, 2000<br />Inability to interact face-to-face with instructors and peers<br />Distractions in vicinity<br />Internet access problems<br />Lack of time to participate<br />Inability to see demonstrations<br />Lippert et al. 1998, 1999, 2000<br />Pros and Cons of Online Learning<br />
    11. 11. Rationale for Current Study<br />Lack of empirical evaluations of on-line distance learning impacts in the forestry education literature<br />Most evaluations of on-line distance learning education programs occur during or after the program (few that measure knowledge before and after)<br />Role of on-line distance learning in forestry education, especially as it relates to awareness and behavior<br />
    12. 12. Sustainable Forestry Principles<br />Contribute to the Conservation of Biological Diversity of the Forest and the Landscape in Which it Resides<br />Maintain or Improve Productive Capacity<br />Maintain the Health and Vigor of the Forest and its Landscape/Watershed<br />Protect Soil and Water Resources<br />Consider Carbon Cycles<br />Consider Socio-Economic Benefits and Impacts<br />Comply with Laws and Legally Adopted Rules and Implement Applicable Guidelines in States Not Using the Regulatory Approach<br />
    13. 13. Research Objectives<br />1) Determine baseline levels of awareness in relation to specific webinar topics and general sustainable principles and compare to post-webinar levels of awareness in relation to webinar topics and sustainable forestry<br />2) Determine the influence of webinar participation on information-seeking and forest conservation behaviors<br />
    14. 14. Research Methodology<br />Design and implement a 6-part Webinar Series on Sustainable Forestry (as part of ForestConnect series)<br />Pre and Post Test (Web Survey)<br />Tailored Design Method (Dillman et al. 2009)<br />Pre-test administered immediately preceding webinar (RR=85.3%)<br />Post-test administered 6 weeks following last webinar (RR=62.1%)<br />Survey Topics<br />Woodland owner attitudes<br />Awareness of webinar topics<br />Behavior<br />
    15. 15. Study Measures<br />Awareness<br />Self-assessments of awareness related to webinar topics<br />Feel informed about___<br />Know the characteristics of_____<br />Can identify practices____<br />Understand why __ is important<br />Understand how____<br />Aware of how to seek information about ___<br />Aware of tools___<br />Aware of different strategies/alternatives for ____<br />Pre-test Cronbach’s α=0.83-0.95<br />Post-test Cronbach’s α=0.86-0.95<br />
    16. 16. Study Measures<br />Behavior<br />Information-seeking<br />Gather more information on the topic<br />Explore resources from webinar<br />Take another class<br />Talk to others about topic<br />Teach others what learned about topic<br />Teaching others who manage forests<br />
    17. 17. Study Measures<br /><ul><li>Behavior
    18. 18. Woodland Management Activities
    19. 19. Create or change management plan
    20. 20. Conduct inventory
    21. 21. Adopt or change practice related to harvest
    22. 22. Adopt or change practice related to overall forest management
    23. 23. Adopt or change practice related to soil or water management
    24. 24. Engage in collaboration with adjacent landowners
    25. 25. Work more with family on family forest planning
    26. 26. Seek a professional forester’s advice related to woodland
    27. 27. Pursue certification for woodland
    28. 28. Behavior
    29. 29. Sustainable Forestry Principles (7)</li></li></ul><li>Sustainable Woodlands Webinars<br />Held bi-weekly over 3 months (May-August 2009)<br />Monthly press release for advertising<br />Exclusively electronic marketing<br />Participant registration required<br />Each speaker receives 2 - 3 hrs of coaching<br />Consistent evaluation of each webinar<br />
    30. 30. “Sustainable Woodlands” Webinar Series<br />www.SustainableWoodlands.org<br />
    31. 31.
    32. 32.
    33. 33. Webinar Participants<br />42.8% Woodland Owners<br />33.3% Foresters<br />13.1% Educators<br />13.7% Specialists<br />9.7% had never attended in-person seminar<br />67.4% Male<br />32.6% Female<br />
    34. 34. Number of Repeat Webinar Attendees<br />
    35. 35. Participants’ Likelihood of Engaging in Woodland Conservation Activities related to Sustainable Forestry Principles<br />
    36. 36. Awareness(Pre and Post-Test Results)<br />*<br />*<br />*<br />*<br />*<br />Scale: -2 to +2<br />* p<.05<br />
    37. 37. Participants’ Likelihood of Engaging in Information-Seeking Activities<br />
    38. 38. Participants’ Likelihood of Engaging in Woodland Management Activities<br />
    39. 39. Conclusions<br /><ul><li>Reaching new audience?
    40. 40. Age, gender
    41. 41. 10% new to forestry education, now receiving regular communications
    42. 42. Is this significant?
    43. 43. Forestry webinars do influence woodland owners and forestry professionals to seek out more information and potentially learn more
    44. 44. Forestry webinars do increase awareness and influence some behaviors
    45. 45. Do behavioral intentions lead to actual behavior? Lasting behavior change?
    46. 46. Future research needed, follow-up contact to determine if followed through on intentions</li></li></ul><li>Implications for Foresters<br />Webinars are an effective learning opportunity for a variety of audiences from professional foresters to woodland owners and educators. <br />Encouraging woodland owners to participate in distance learning programs can have positive impact to forest management<br />Owners, as participants, voluntarily sought information about sustainable forestry principles (SFP). SFP provides a potential point of connection with owners.<br />Owners who learned about SFP planned to seek more information, change their current management practices and plan, conduct resource assessments, pursue succession planning, and hire a forester.<br />Foresters should be aware of current educational topics and able to discuss with owners seeking more information.<br />Field foresters might refine skills and services related to SFP and market to woodland owners.<br />Educational programs can trigger increased awareness, knowledge, and implementation of policy initiatives.<br />
    47. 47. srb237@cornell.edu<br />(607) 255-2149<br />www.human-dimensions.org<br />Shorna Broussard AllredAssociate ProfessorHuman Dimensions of Natural Resources<br />Acknowledgements:<br />Funding provided by a grant from the Sustainable Forests Partnership<br />Thanks to Cornell Undergraduate Research Assistants Laura Wetzel <br />and Michael Roberts for their assistance with this project<br />

    ×