SHERPA MEDIA TRAINING<br />2011<br />
AGENDA & OBJECTIVES<br />Understanding the Media<br /><ul><li>Explaining Today’s Media Landscape
Drill Down: Social Media – Gaining in Popularity and Importance
Journalists: The Good, Bad and Ugly
How Public Relations Operates - the basics</li></ul>Being a Spokesperson; Delivering Messages<br /><ul><li>Message Develop...
Spokesperson Dos and Don’ts</li></li></ul><li>Print/Online Publishers (Touch)<br />Many still enjoy the ‘feel’ of a magazi...
Demystifying the Media<br />
HOW IT HAPPENED…<br />Social Media gains in familiarity and users<br />1-2 Hours per day given up for email<br />Admit it,...
THE CHATTERING CLASSES<br />Facebook: 600m+ users<br />- Avg. user creates 70 pieces/month<br />Twitter: 195m user account...
JOURNALISTS<br />
MEDIA AUDIENCES<br />Major Media:Correspondents at National and International newspapers and broadcast journalists at regi...
JOURNALISTS<br />THE BEARD<br />Up to 20+ years in the business<br />Experience as a staff journalist and perhaps as an ad...
JOURNALISTS<br />THE BABY<br />The Dream: Had hoped to become a Novelist<br />The Reality: The rent was due; takes any job...
JOURNALISTS<br />THE BELLIGERENT<br />The baby grown up; Still in denial about not being the next Shakespeare<br />Tried t...
JOURNALISTS<br />THE BUSKER<br />The fastest growing sector for ‘real’ journalists<br />Either: 1) years of staff journali...
JOURNALISTS<br />THE BLOGGER<br />Either an Enthusiast or a Fantasist<br />Clearly Has Too Much Available Time<br />Can be...
HOW THE PR PROCESS OPERATES<br />
The publicity process is inherently challenging because everybody has an opinion on how it should be run and the press rar...
STORY DEVELOPMENT PROCESS<br /><ul><li> Your Story
 Your Competitor’s Story
 The Consultant/Analyst Perspective
 The Reporter, Writer and Editor Spin
 The Copy Editor/Headline Editor Spin</li></ul>These Balance Out As: “The Published Stories”<br />
LAWS OF PUBLICITY<br />The amount of publicity generated will be directly proportional to:<br /><ul><li>The amount of inhe...
The amount of added energy put into the process
Delivering “proof of story value”/importance to reader
Taking advantage of "industry winds”
How easy it is for the press to cover the story
Clear, well thought-out messaging for each issue and theme
The creativity of ongoing “story ideas”
The consistency and quality of the messages
The quality of the partners/event - speakers/exhibits, attendees</li></li></ul><li>MESSAGING & MESSAGE DELIVERY<br />
Like a Good Sandwich, in Messaging Quality Really Does Matter<br />
KEY MESSAGES<br />These are the statements we wish to have <br />appear prominently in the media. <br />Therefore, they mu...
MESSAGING MATRIX<br />Wide Range of Product Areas<br />Differentiators<br />Company ABC<br />Mission Statement<br />Market...
DON’T FOCUS ON…<br /><ul><li>Revenue breakout
Forwarding looking statements regarding products or market expectation
Guarantees of product cost & availability
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Sherpa Media Training 2011

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This stripped down version of my media training does not inlcude the company/issue specific slides addressin the particular needs of those being trained but hopefully those needing a good tutorial

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Sherpa Media Training 2011

  1. 1. SHERPA MEDIA TRAINING<br />2011<br />
  2. 2. AGENDA & OBJECTIVES<br />Understanding the Media<br /><ul><li>Explaining Today’s Media Landscape
  3. 3. Drill Down: Social Media – Gaining in Popularity and Importance
  4. 4. Journalists: The Good, Bad and Ugly
  5. 5. How Public Relations Operates - the basics</li></ul>Being a Spokesperson; Delivering Messages<br /><ul><li>Message Development and Consistency
  6. 6. Spokesperson Dos and Don’ts</li></li></ul><li>Print/Online Publishers (Touch)<br />Many still enjoy the ‘feel’ of a magazine, newspaper<br />Still the best source for long-format, issues driven news<br />Future? Based on consumer demand/interest…once that diminishes so will hard-copy news sources<br />New Media (Share & Engage)<br />Driven by fast moving news issues (natural disaster, politics)<br />‘The’ choice for youth but gaining new, older audiences <br />Flexible enough to be consumed ‘on the go <br />Fed by professionals and hobbyists<br />Removes barriers for consumers<br />Broadcast (Listen and/or View)<br />Infotainment quality; 24 hour/day; reduces info overload<br />Searchable content = only watch what you want <br />High speed wireless enables streaming ‘on the go’<br />‘Pro-sumers’ are leveling the playing field for content creation<br />
  7. 7. Demystifying the Media<br />
  8. 8. HOW IT HAPPENED…<br />Social Media gains in familiarity and users<br />1-2 Hours per day given up for email<br />Admit it, you miss me…<br />2009 - 2010<br />1990<br />2008<br />1995<br />1994<br />2005<br />2011<br />Business latches on and legitimizes the platform<br />Challenge: in real terms SM asks more of us than previous innovations but its potential is uncertain<br />www.<br />Search<br />Disruptive technology: like a phone; like a telly but better in some ways<br />1998<br />
  9. 9. THE CHATTERING CLASSES<br />Facebook: 600m+ users<br />- Avg. user creates 70 pieces/month<br />Twitter: 195m user accounts<br />- 300,000 New users/day<br />LinkedIn: 90m members<br />- 50% Are Decision Makers in Their Co's<br />Wikipedia: 17m+ articles/270 languages<br />- 5thmost visited website<br />YouTube: 3rd most used search engine.<br />- 2b videos watched/day; 24 hours video uploaded every minute<br />
  10. 10. JOURNALISTS<br />
  11. 11. MEDIA AUDIENCES<br />Major Media:Correspondents at National and International newspapers and broadcast journalists at regional bureaus<br /><ul><li> e.g. The BBC, FT and WSJE</li></ul>Business Press: Local Business Weeklies and Monthlies<br /><ul><li>e.g. Bloomberg BusinessWeek, The Economist</li></ul>Trade Press:Vertical industry specific titles<br />Web/Blogs:From any of the above but including the end user<br />
  12. 12. JOURNALISTS<br />THE BEARD<br />Up to 20+ years in the business<br />Experience as a staff journalist and perhaps as an administrator, e.g. Managing Editor<br />Considers themselves to an industry authority<br />Feels that they have heard and seen it all<br />Can become easily bored, but still seeks meetings and attends industry events<br />Often very productive; could be the biggest single source of press coverage for a particular region<br />
  13. 13. JOURNALISTS<br />THE BABY<br />The Dream: Had hoped to become a Novelist<br />The Reality: The rent was due; takes any job they could<br />Spends the first year without a clue of what’s being said yet still files seven stories a week.<br />These journalists represent a long-term hope for a constructive and trusting media relationship<br />
  14. 14. JOURNALISTS<br />THE BELLIGERENT<br />The baby grown up; Still in denial about not being the next Shakespeare<br />Tried to augment journalism career with in-house corporate stint but fails and returns to journalism<br />Constantly plays the contrarian – often responds aggressively to ‘pre-planned’ marketing messages <br />Responds best when given access to the top people and exclusive news opportunities<br />
  15. 15. JOURNALISTS<br />THE BUSKER<br />The fastest growing sector for ‘real’ journalists<br />Either: 1) years of staff journalism result in redundancy; 2) low pay results in an entrepreneur -a freelancer<br />Works from home; does media training and ghost writing to augment income.<br />Writes more on publisher need than for personal interest.<br />Lack of inside knowledge can pose opportunities for well organized PR teams<br />
  16. 16. JOURNALISTS<br />THE BLOGGER<br />Either an Enthusiast or a Fantasist<br />Clearly Has Too Much Available Time<br />Can be surprisingly well informed and articulate; perhaps more so than trade journalists restricted by company mediocrity<br />Difficult to place a value on; Difficult to engage with<br />No hierarchical structure can make them loose cannons<br />
  17. 17. HOW THE PR PROCESS OPERATES<br />
  18. 18. The publicity process is inherently challenging because everybody has an opinion on how it should be run and the press rarely know a good story when they see one.<br />
  19. 19. STORY DEVELOPMENT PROCESS<br /><ul><li> Your Story
  20. 20. Your Competitor’s Story
  21. 21. The Consultant/Analyst Perspective
  22. 22. The Reporter, Writer and Editor Spin
  23. 23. The Copy Editor/Headline Editor Spin</li></ul>These Balance Out As: “The Published Stories”<br />
  24. 24. LAWS OF PUBLICITY<br />The amount of publicity generated will be directly proportional to:<br /><ul><li>The amount of inherent “story energy”
  25. 25. The amount of added energy put into the process
  26. 26. Delivering “proof of story value”/importance to reader
  27. 27. Taking advantage of "industry winds”
  28. 28. How easy it is for the press to cover the story
  29. 29. Clear, well thought-out messaging for each issue and theme
  30. 30. The creativity of ongoing “story ideas”
  31. 31. The consistency and quality of the messages
  32. 32. The quality of the partners/event - speakers/exhibits, attendees</li></li></ul><li>MESSAGING & MESSAGE DELIVERY<br />
  33. 33. Like a Good Sandwich, in Messaging Quality Really Does Matter<br />
  34. 34. KEY MESSAGES<br />These are the statements we wish to have <br />appear prominently in the media. <br />Therefore, they must be stated easily <br />and frequently during interviews<br />
  35. 35. MESSAGING MATRIX<br />Wide Range of Product Areas<br />Differentiators<br />Company ABC<br />Mission Statement<br />Market/Industry Focus<br />Industry Leadership<br />
  36. 36. DON’T FOCUS ON…<br /><ul><li>Revenue breakout
  37. 37. Forwarding looking statements regarding products or market expectation
  38. 38. Guarantees of product cost & availability
  39. 39. Client engagement details
  40. 40. Competitor Differentiation</li></li></ul><li>1<br />Never ever take a reporter’s call directly. <br />KISS. They’re journalists, not brain surgeons. Keep answers focused, short and relevant. <br />2<br />Trust the Boy Scout Motto. Be Prepared. Before you begin, know who you’re talking to, and decide what they might be most interested in.<br />3<br />
  41. 41. 4<br />Stay within your own area of competence. <br />5<br />Consider that every word you say could end up in print. <br />Sell , but do so softly. Give the perception that <br />your role/goal is to provide a service to the media. <br />6<br />
  42. 42. 7<br />Assume nothing. Get a feeling for where the journalist stands. <br />Seize the opportunity to make the points you want to make, always returning to your key theme when answering a reporter’s question. <br />8<br />9<br />Keep in mind your primary concern is for your company, its customers and partners. <br />
  43. 43. Deny and/or correct misinterpretations firmly and quickly when necessary.<br />10<br />11<br />Keep the journalist’s audience in mind at all times.<br />12<br />Know your messages.<br />
  44. 44. 13<br />Don’t speak for others in the industry. <br />14<br />Be careful of deliberate provocation by the reporter. <br />15<br />Restate leading or rambling questions back to the reporter.<br />
  45. 45. DEALING WITH THE PRESS<br />
  46. 46. OFF LIMIT QUESTIONS<br />Legal<br />Ongoing legal discussions, or bound by SEC regulations<br />Legal considerations<br />Pending results <br />Proprietary<br />Competitive<br />Proprietary considerations<br />Pending further findings<br />Your Response<br />1. General Response : "As you know, we are in....”<br />2. Lead-in To Direct Response: "You've asked a good question, however..." <br />3. Promise/Future: "I'll be glad to discuss that with you at a later date..."<br />
  47. 47. REPORTER QUESTIONING TACTICS<br />Your Response<br />Pigeon Holing<br />Reunite Yourself with Humanity.<br />This question is designed toseparate you and your industry from the rest of humanity.<br />Example: Announcing Something New<br />“Aren’t you just announcing the same initiative as you did last year at this time?”<br />“Not at all. This is an entirely new program. We are constantly investing in programs to advance our equipment and service offerings so perhaps you have this one confused with another but I assure you this is a stand-alone initiative not a rehash of something you’ve heard before.”<br />
  48. 48. REPORTER QUESTIONING TACTICS<br />Death or Destruction<br />Your Response<br />Personalise your response to the interviewer and negate any misinterpretations.<br />This question can force you to make a choice between twoequally negative responses.<br />Example:<br />“In today’s belt-tightening environment, it’s hard to believe that incentive exist for companies or governments to appropriate money to explore/develop these new programs. I realize you have to continue pushing these but it’s clearly not a time for extras. You guys havegot to be running out of realistic ideas.”<br />“Actually, energy revenue grew by XX% in the past X years and we are in position to meet the growing demand.<br />The market is expecting lower demand so our mission is to protect our business through, among other things, maintaining customer relationships by focusing on execution and quality.”<br />
  49. 49. REPORTER QUESTIONING TACTICS<br />Hit and Run<br />Your Response<br />The reporter’s design here is to state a strong negative and then move on to a very natural topic without giving you<br />any time to refute the opener.<br />Never let a negative comment go unchallenged. <br />Example:<br />“This announcement is premature and only serves to exploit the market condition. Anyway, why don’t you tell me about it – that’s why I came here…”<br />“We can talk about the news in a moment but first, let me explain what our company is all about because I think you’ve misunderstood our position”<br />
  50. 50. TAILORING YOUR RESPONSE<br />Bridging<br />An important media technique<br />A powerful way to take charge of & control an interview<br />Helps focus the reporter on a few key messages that are<br /><ul><li> True
  51. 51. Accurate
  52. 52. Clear
  53. 53. Concise
  54. 54. Brief
  55. 55. Memorable</li></ul>It ensures that your key messages appear in the story<br />By using bridging techniques, you can re-focus or re-direct the interview to the messages you want to convey<br />
  56. 56. TAILORING YOUR RESPONSE<br />Bridging<br />Your Response<br />The reporter may raise a sensitive issue relating to inward investment, staff redundancies or a legal or political issue.<br />Bridging allows you to acknowledge the question and give credibility to the journalist while moving the answer in another direction – your direction.<br />That is why….<br />This is another example of…<br />Let me expand on that…<br />However, the real issues here is…<br />If we look at the bigger picture…<br />Let me put this into perspective…<br />And what this all means is…<br />If we take a broader perspective….<br />This is an important point because…<br />
  57. 57. PREPPING FOR BROADCAST: TV/RADIO/WEB<br /><ul><li>Very tight deadlines.
  58. 58. They thrive on Negative/Controversial subjects – So Use Caution
  59. 59. Stay engaged at all times.
  60. 60. Deliver your three messages through short declarative sentences.
  61. 61. Be conversational and energetic. The way you say something is as important as the words.
  62. 62. Avoid jargon, acronyms and excessive numbers.
  63. 63. Assume the camera and/or microphone are always on.
  64. 64. Make your body language consistent with your message.
  65. 65. Don’t nod unless you are agreeing.
  66. 66. Look at the reporter, not the camera.
  67. 67. Show and tell. TV is a visual medium.
  68. 68. Before a telephone interview, choose a quiet environment. </li></li></ul><li>Please Don’t<br /><ul><li>Miss scheduled interviews - you’ll make enemies
  69. 69. Answer questions outside your specialty
  70. 70. Speculate
  71. 71. Use jargon throughout the interview
  72. 72. Answer “no comment” – sounds defensive
  73. 73. Assume that the journalist has left the call</li></li></ul><li>Please Do<br /><ul><li>Look good, and be prompt
  74. 74. Use positive gestures, eye contact, posture, voice, etc…
  75. 75. Manage expectations, provide proof, not promises
  76. 76. Stay within area of competence
  77. 77. Sketch out key messages beforehand
  78. 78. Be proactive, not guilty or defensive
  79. 79. Use simple language</li></li></ul><li>DID WE FORGET TO MENTION?<br />Rememberwhoseinterviewit is…<br />YOURS<br />

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