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DENTAL SECTION  FOR PATIENT
Nutrition & Oral Health       Dr. Sherif Tehemar
FactFood PyramidFood & Age Soft DrinksSmart Snack
FACT   A diet that is high in carbohydrates (starches and sugar)    may be sweet and easy to eat, but it promotes tooth  ...
Each plate is one serving. The number of servings you need each day (for adults and   children) is given for each shelf of...
Serving Size: Standardized size based on amounts people actually eat. Similar food products have similarServing sizes maki...
Infants   Children have high energy needs for growth and    development. It is important that children are given    energ...
Infants    Practical tips:    Foods   Do not add sugar to home prepared weaning foods   Limit baby foods sweetened with ...
School Children & Adolescents   Changes in eating habits due to relative    independence from family influences and the  ...
School Children & Adolescents    Practical tips:    Foods   Suggestions for between meal snacks are fruit, crisp raw    v...
Adults and Older People   Loss of natural teeth is associated with poor nutritional    status in the elderly. Consumption...
Adults and Older People    Practical tips:    Foods   Elderly people should be encouraged to eat a variety of healthy    ...
Soft Drinks   Rising consumption of soft drinks is causing concern    according to recent research.   Particular concern...
Soft Drinks   The frequent consumption of sugar containing fizzy    drinks not only put teeth at risk to decay but can   ...
Smart Snacks   Maintain an adequate calcium intake to ensure that    your saliva has sufficient calcium to repair or reve...
Smart Snacks   Reach for tooth-friendly snack foods including    nuts, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, and sugarless    gum...
Smart Snacks   Remember some foods may actually fight oral    diseases on contact, such as hard cheeses and black    tea....
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Nutrition & oral health

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Nutrition & oral health

  1. 1. DENTAL SECTION FOR PATIENT
  2. 2. Nutrition & Oral Health Dr. Sherif Tehemar
  3. 3. FactFood PyramidFood & Age Soft DrinksSmart Snack
  4. 4. FACT A diet that is high in carbohydrates (starches and sugar) may be sweet and easy to eat, but it promotes tooth decay for all age groups. The bacteria in your mouth use carbohydrates to produce acids that cause decay. Decreased intake of vitamins and minerals can directly lead to mouth sores and periodontal (gum tissue) breakdown. Poor diet also affects immune system functioning, and people with lowered immunity have been shown to be at increased risk for developing gum disease. The increased susceptibility to gum disease is likely due to a decreased ability to resist periodontal pathogens (disease-causing bacteria).
  5. 5. Each plate is one serving. The number of servings you need each day (for adults and children) is given for each shelf of the Food Pyramid. Choose whatever combination of plates you like to make up your total number.Choose any 2Chose 3 servings during pregnancy.Choose any 3Choose at least 4 for teenagers and 5 servings ifpregnant or breast feeding.Choose low fat choices frequently. Not suitablefor young children.Choose any 4Choose green leafy vegetables regularly foressential folic acid.Choose citrus fruits and fruit juices frequently.Choose any 6+Choose high fibre cereals and breads frequently.If physical activity is high up to 12 servings maybe necessary.Drink water regularly - at least 8 cups of fluidper person.
  6. 6. Serving Size: Standardized size based on amounts people actually eat. Similar food products have similarServing sizes making it easier to compare foods in the same category. For example, the nutritional contentof two similar types of tomato sauce can be compared % Daily Value: Indicates how food fits within a 2,000 calorie diet. Based on dietary recommendations for most healthy people. This helps you to understand if the food has "a lot" or "a little" of the most important nutrients. Middle Section: The nutrients listed in the middle section are the ones most important to good health. This helps you to calculate your daily limits for fat, fiber, sodium and other nutrients. Vitamins & Minerals: The Percent Daily Value is the same as the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowance for vitamins and minerals (same levels). Only these vitamins and minerals are required on labels although the manufacturer has the option to include others too. Note: Numbers on the Nutrition Facts label may be rounded for labeling (no decimal proportions listed).
  7. 7. Infants Children have high energy needs for growth and development. It is important that children are given energy rich foods that are nutritious such as cereals, breads, dairy foods, and meats, chicken and eggs. Foods from the first four shelves of the food pyramid should be used to replace foods from the very top shelf that are high in added sugars/fats such as chocolate, cakes and sweets.
  8. 8. Infants Practical tips: Foods Do not add sugar to home prepared weaning foods Limit baby foods sweetened with added sugars Drinks Suitable fluids include water (boiled and cooled for infants under 1 year). Natural mineral waters are not suitable for infants. Fruit juices should be unsweetened, well diluted (1 measure to 4 or 5 measures of water) and given at mealtimes from a cup. Baby juices and herbal drinks are not needed, but if given should be used sparingly, and only at mealtimes from a feeding cup. Colas, squashes, fizzy drinks and diet drinks are unsuitable for infants. Foods should never be added to the baby bottle.
  9. 9. School Children & Adolescents Changes in eating habits due to relative independence from family influences and the influence of peers can result in changes in health behaviors and diet, specifically in relation to sugar.
  10. 10. School Children & Adolescents Practical tips: Foods Suggestions for between meal snacks are fruit, crisp raw vegetables, sandwiches, variety of breads, yoghurts, low fat cheese, plain popcorn and scones Cereals are excellent energy providers, but avoid the sugar- coated types Drinks Milk, water, and sugar free squashes are suitable Diet drinks in moderation can be an alternative
  11. 11. Adults and Older People Loss of natural teeth is associated with poor nutritional status in the elderly. Consumption of sugars seems to be higher in older adults than in younger adults. A tendency towards reduced salivary flow together with a higher sugar intake and increased gum recession, places the older person with natural teeth at greater risk of dental caries (root caries) than younger adults. Dietary advice for dental health for adults with natural teeth should be consistent with general health dietary guidelines.
  12. 12. Adults and Older People Practical tips: Foods Elderly people should be encouraged to eat a variety of healthy foods as snacks from the food pyramid. Drinks The consumption of 8-10 cups of fluid a day is important for this age group.
  13. 13. Soft Drinks Rising consumption of soft drinks is causing concern according to recent research. Particular concern is highlighted about the long term effects of soft drinks displacing milk in the diet of teenage girls. If teenagers do not get enough dietary calcium in these vulnerable years they increase their risk of developing osteoporosis in later life.
  14. 14. Soft Drinks The frequent consumption of sugar containing fizzy drinks not only put teeth at risk to decay but can also cause erosion of the enamel. This is due to their acidic content Fruit juices are an important source of vitamins in the diet. However, they should be taken with meals for two reasons.  The frequent consumption of these can lead to enamel erosion.  although pure juices may not contain sucrose they are rich in fructose and can cause caries.
  15. 15. Smart Snacks Maintain an adequate calcium intake to ensure that your saliva has sufficient calcium to repair or reverse tooth decay in the very early stages. Calcium also prevents the loss of tooth-supporting bone in the jaws as we age. Yogurt, low fat ice cream, puddings or frozen yogurt are calcium-rich dessert alternatives. For those who are lactose-intolerant, calcium-enriched juices, salmon, seafood or green leafy vegetables are all healthy calcium alternatives.
  16. 16. Smart Snacks Reach for tooth-friendly snack foods including nuts, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, and sugarless gums or candies. These foods do not promote the growth of decay-causing bacteria like other foods do.
  17. 17. Smart Snacks Remember some foods may actually fight oral diseases on contact, such as hard cheeses and black tea. Hard cheeses, especially cheddar, neutralize decay- causing acids that are produced by oral bacteria in the presence of other foods. Studies indicate that black tea may protect against periodontal disease. Black tea also contains fluoride, which protects against tooth decay.

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