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2013 WSCSC CHARTER SCHOOL APPLICATION
Cover Sheet & Enrollment Projection
Name of non-profit
applicant entity: First Pla...
2
Proposed School Name
Opening
Year
Geographic Community
Grades
year 1
Grades at capacity
First Place Scholars 2014/15 Gre...
P O Box 22536
Seattle, WA 98122-0536
1 First Place Scholars Charter School
Proposal Narrative1
Specifications
• Observe al...
2 First Place Scholars Charter School
Executive Summary
(2 pages)
The Executive Summary should provide a concise summary o...
3 First Place Scholars Charter School
Our vision is that “Students who attend First Place Scholars demonstrate academic ma...
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with federal, state, and local public school funding, charitable donations, as well ...
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Room portal. Provide, as Attachment 1, the required criminal background check author...
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First Place Scholars program, as we expand enrollment of the school, the plan is to ...
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Section 1. Educational Program Design and Capacity
(25 pages)
Program Overview
Summa...
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violent event” and “among school-age homeless children, 47% have problems such as an...
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5. If the curriculum is not already developed, provide, as Attachment 3, a plan for ...
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Figure I:Education Program Logic Model
We are currently investigating several curri...
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Table 1:Dream Box Math Kindergarten Scope and Sequence (Example)
Dream Box Math Kin...
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reaching school outcome goals, and looked at in conjunction with data and formative...
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4. Explain the policies and standards for promoting students from one grade to the ...
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Figure II: Leading and Lagging Indicators for
Student Performance
High School Gradu...
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2014-2015 School Calendar
**First Place will base breaks and parent teacher confere...
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Table 2:School Schedule
Regular School Day Extended School Day
For a Student
8am-8:...
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School Culture
1. Describe the culture of the proposed school. Explain how it will ...
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self-efficacy, character building, and ‘learning to learn’ skills. Classrooms will ...
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4. If applicable, describe any other student-focused activities and programs that a...
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challenges for gifted students;
• Reading and language arts activities;
• One-on-on...
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Figure III: Collective Care Logic Model
We will deploy two multidisciplinary teams,...
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elementary schools (i.e. schools in which at least 50% of students receive free or ...
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are English language learners and, if not addressed in a holistic, are at risk for ...
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concerns are brought to the team, each member provides observations, questions and ...
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FPSCS will work with all students enrolled on bolstering behavioral skills to addre...
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yearly to ensure that students who attain Fluent English Proficiency no longer are ...
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advanced or gifted programs, students who are limited in English proficiency, stude...
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FPSCS will continue to challenge highly capable students with work at their level, ...
29 First Place Scholars Charter School
Student Recruitment and Enrollment.
Student Eligibility. All students, Kindergarten...
30 First Place Scholars Charter School
Once a student has been accepted to FPSCS, they will not have to resubmit letters o...
FIRSTPLACE FINAL CHARTER AP REV 01152014
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FIRSTPLACE FINAL CHARTER AP REV 01152014

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FIRSTPLACE FINAL CHARTER AP REV 01152014

  1. 1. 1 2013 WSCSC CHARTER SCHOOL APPLICATION Cover Sheet & Enrollment Projection Name of non-profit applicant entity: First Place Scholars Primary contact person: Sheri Day Mailing address: Street/PO Box: 172 20 th Street City: Seattle State WA Zip 98122 Phone Number: day (206) 323-6715 evening 206-271-6195 Fax Number: (206) 323-3709 Email: sday@firstplaceschool.org Names, roles, and current employment of all persons on applicant team (add lines as needed): Full Name Current Job Title and Employer Position with Proposed School Sheri Day Former Office Manager for American Friends Service Committee, Inc. Board President Daniel Seydel President & CEO Platinum, LLC Business Development Consulting Board Vice President Isabel Landsberg Retired Volunteer (academic advising and private school office management) Board Secretary Larry Crim Real Estate Broker, Windermere Real Estate Board Member Uti Cleveland Elementary Teacher, Seattle Public Schools Board Member Does this applicant team have charter school applications under consideration by any other authorizer(s) in the United States? Yes No If yes, complete the table below, adding lines as needed. State Authorizer Proposed School Name Application Due Date Decision Date Does this applicant team have new schools scheduled to open elsewhere in the United States in the 2014-15 school year? Yes No If yes, complete the table below, adding lines as needed. Proposed School Name City State Opening Date Does this applicant team have new schools approved but scheduled to open in years beyond 2014-15? Yes No If yes, complete the table below, adding lines as needed. Authorizer # of Schools City State Opening Years
  2. 2. 2 Proposed School Name Opening Year Geographic Community Grades year 1 Grades at capacity First Place Scholars 2014/15 Greater Seattle Metroplex K-5 K-5 Identification of Geographic Community may be as specific as a neighborhood or as general as a county targeted for school location; it must also include identification of the district in which the school is located. Does the school intend to contract or partner with a non-profit education service provider (ESP) or other organization to provide school management services? Yes No If yes, identify the ESP: Does the school intend to partner or be affiliated with an existing or planned non-profit charter management organization (CMO) through which a single governing board governs or will govern multiple schools? Yes No If yes, identify the CMO/Partner: Proposed Principal/Head of School Information: Provide the following information, if known Name of proposed principal candidate: TBD / Job Description Provided in application Current employment: Phone Number: Day Evening Email: School Enrollment Projections Academic Year Planned # of Students Maximum # of Students Grade Levels Served Year 1 (14/15) 98 260 K-5 Year 2 (15/16) 112 260 K-5 Year 3 (16/17) 126 260 K-5 Year 4 (17/18) 140 260 K-5 Year 5 (18/19) 154 260 K-5 At Capacity (18/19) 154 260 K-5
  3. 3. P O Box 22536 Seattle, WA 98122-0536 1 First Place Scholars Charter School Proposal Narrative1 Specifications • Observe all page limits. Attachments are not included in the page limits, and should not be included in this document, but rather uploaded individually as directed in the online application submission portal. • Add the full name of your school to the footer of this document so that it appears on all pages. • This document must be typed with 1-inch page margins and 12-point font, single-spaced. Use the boxes provided to type your responses. • Each major section (Executive Summary, Educational Program Design and Capacity, etc.) must begin on a separate page. • If a particular question does not apply to your team or proposal, respond “Not Applicable,” and briefly explain why the question is not applicable to your team or proposal. • Do not delete or modify questions, tables, or sections (including changing font sizes) unless specifically instructed in this document. • When you have completed your response and verified that all formatting requirements are met, save your document as a PDF file. Name your file according to this convention: OPERATORNAME.Narrative.pdf. Upload your PDF file to the online application submission portal. Please keep in mind that your application is a professional document. The quality of the document that you submit should reflect the quality of the school that you propose to open. Evaluation Teams will be able to navigate well-organized, effectively-edited documents easily, thereby focusing their energy on reviewing the content of the application. Grammar, spelling, and formatting all make an impression on an evaluator. 1 This document has been formatted using 1 inch margins and 12 point Browallia New Font, single spaced. No font style was specified in this RFP.
  4. 4. 2 First Place Scholars Charter School Executive Summary (2 pages) The Executive Summary should provide a concise summary of the following: • The proposed plan for the school; • The geographic and population considerations of the school environment; • The challenges particular to those considerations; and • The applicant team’s capacity to successfully open and operate a high quality school given the above considerations. First Place Scholars Charter School Executive Summary Overview. First Place Scholars Charter School (FPSCS) is proposing to open for the 2014-15 academic year in order to deliver a unique approach to educating and stabilizing students living in poverty and with multiple traumas including homelessness. This approach includes rigorous academics as well as coordination of intervention and support services for students. Twenty-five years of running the existing First Place’s2 [elementary] school, which is currently a non-tuition private school that will close in June 2014, has taught us that educating students living in poverty and with multiple traumas must be done in a holistic way that recognizes students’ trauma is a key reason for academic failure. To best address FPSCS students’ academic and social-emotional needs, we will keep our school small and serve 98, K-5 students in 2014-15 (Year One) with growth of up to 154, K-5 students in 2018-19 (Year Five). 1. Mission and Vision. State the mission and vision of the proposed school. The mission is a statement of the fundamental purpose of the school, describing why it exists. The vision statement outlines how the school will operate and what it will achieve in the long term. The mission and vision statement provide the foundation for the entire proposal. The mission and vision statements, taken together, should: • Identify the students and community to be served; • Articulate the goals for the school; • Illustrate what success will look like; and • Align with the purposes of the Washington charter school law and the Commission’s stated priorities for new schools. Mission, Vision, Shared Commitments, and Goals. Our mission is that, “First Place Scholars Charter School educates and supports K-5 students – who are living in poverty and with multiple traumas – to rise above their personal circumstances, accelerate academically, commit to continuous learning, display strength of character, and prepare for college and career readiness. Students learn through a 21st -Century curriculum aligned with internationally-benchmarked standards, instruction, materials, and assessments and in a culturally-relevant, technology-enhanced, data-rich, student-centered, and small-school environment.” 2 Reference to “First Place” is regarding the existing private school that will be the standard for the Charter School.
  5. 5. 3 First Place Scholars Charter School Our vision is that “Students who attend First Place Scholars demonstrate academic mastery, social-emotional confidence, and readiness for and commitment to a college and career readiness middle- and high-school course of study. They and their families realize stability in housing, personal finance, and overall health and possess the life skills to make future life choices.” Achieving the mission and vision requires our leaders, staff, partners, and volunteers to embrace a set of shared commitments and goals. Our three goals are to: 1) increase students’ skills, ability, and self-efficacy to address their social and emotional challenges; 2) accelerate each student’s academic performance as demonstrated by monitoring academic growth on a weekly basis; and, 3) demonstrate that students who attend FPSCS for two or more years leave fifth grade proficient in all subjects. Our commitments are to: recognize and respond to each student’s unique academic and cultural needs; deliver a rigorous but differentiated academic program; educate and support homeless students, those living in poverty, those living with multiple traumas, as well as those who attend FPSCS without such challenges; build children’s strength of character in terms of service, courage, humility, resilience, academic grit and achievement, agency, originality, and leadership; involve each child’s family in the FPSCS’s learning community; connect students and their families to supportive services within and external to the school; provide a safe, culturally rich, and supportive haven for students and their families; ensure professional learning, development, responsibility, accountability, quality, and deportment; and model diversity, stewardship, and compassion. 2. Educational Need and Target and Anticipated Student Populations. Describe the anticipated student population, students’ anticipated educational needs, and non-academic challenges the school is likely to encounter. Describe the rationale for selecting the location and student body. Identify any enrollment priorities on which the program is based consistent with applicable restrictions on enrollment eligibility and selection. Educational Need & Target and Anticipated Student Populations. The population FPSCS will serve aligns with the Intent section of the Washington public charter school law and will mirror the socio-economic status of the children who have been enrolled at the existing First Place [elementary] school: in the 2012/13 school year, 97% of students received free/reduced lunches and 67% were homeless at the start of the year (with just 44% remaining homeless by year’s end). Furthermore 54% were African American; 8% were Asian or Pacific Islanders; 3% were Native American; 3% were European American; 1.5 % were Latino; 28% were multiracial; 13% would have been assessed to determine whether they were eligible for ELL services; 25% received Title I tutoring; and 11.5% of students received support services through individualized education plans. FPSCS will draw, as has the existing school, from throughout the Seattle School District. 3. Education Plan/School Design. Provide an overview of the education program of the proposed school, including major instructional methods and assessment strategies and non-negotiables of the school model. Describe the evidence that demonstrates the school model will be successful in improving academic achievement for the targeted student population. Summarize what the proposed school would do more effectively than the schools that are now serving the targeted population and how the school would achieve its goals. Education Plan/School Design. FSCS will: 1) Provide a rigorous and stable educational environment for students living with trauma and in poverty who are educated at its First Place-owned facility in Seattle’s central district; 2) Enable students to receive strong academic and mental health programming linked to common, school-wide, and high-quality standards, curriculum, instructional approaches, academic intervention, technology, assessments, behavioral approaches, and supportive services; 3) Connect students’ families to community social services, their child’s school, parenting, self-advocacy skill workshops, and mental health services; and 4) Support the educational program, academic environment, supportive services, and talented school leaders, educators, and staff
  6. 6. 4 First Place Scholars Charter School with federal, state, and local public school funding, charitable donations, as well as a deep and broad volunteer base. To open FPSCS in fall 2014, we will: 1) Hire a school leader – immediately – along with key administrative, student support services, and instructional staff; 2) Establish a vertically and horizontally aligned K-5 curriculum based on core content standards (Common Core State Standards in math and English Language Arts, Next Generation Science Standards, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies) as well as 21st Century skills,3 and on the integration of instructional strategies based on a backward design curriculum / lesson plan process using formative assessment and Response to Intervention (RTI)4 strategies to guide differentiation for each student; 3) Provide professional development through internal and external resources to facilitate implementation of our education program and school wide use of Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS)5 practices; 4) Reinforce core content through extended-day project-based enrichment instruction6 in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM);7 5) Enhance technology applications in and outside of the classroom to facilitate data use, analysis, performance management, and skills acceleration, and provide teachers and students with relevant resources, tools, and skills; 6) Reorganize facilities, finances, technology, administration, governance, partner contracts, and educational programming; 7) expand governing board membership to include those with expertise in public school finance; educational leadership and management; fundraising; psychology; and law; and 8) Re-engage the existing school’s base of dedicated volunteers, mentors, partners, and charities/funders. 4. Community Engagement. Describe the relationships that you have established to generate community engagement in and support for the proposed school and how you have assessed demand and/or solicited support for the school. Briefly describe these activities and summarize their results. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Community Engagement. The existing First Place organization has built a strong base of community support—partnering with a myriad of non-profits, governmental agencies, and universities to deliver services including housing, mental health, health, and wrap- around, supplementary, and summer education. The same organization has deployed at least 115 volunteers – which will continue to be involved in FPSCS – who have contributed 3,400 hours per year. Parents support opening a new charter school as has been evident through parental attendance at key charter information and development events and parental participation on charter workgroups or in planning retreats—these have also included many members of the current staff, volunteers, and community members. Lastly, Central District neighbors are supportive of FPSCS and have participated in night-out and fish-fry events. 5. Leadership and Governance. List the members of the school’s proposed leadership team and governing board, including their roles with the school and their current professional affiliation (add lines to this table as needed). A complete application requires the Applicant to submit a signed Certification and Authorization Form for A Criminal History Background Check (Criminal History Authorization Form) for each of the school’s proposed leadership team and governing board. The Criminal History Authorization Form, which is incorporated by reference, is located at the Commission’s website and on the Review 3 Partnership for 21st Century Skills: http://www.p21.org/index.php 4 Douglas D. Dexter, Ph.D., and Charles Hughes, Ph.D., Penn State University Progress Monitoring Within a Response-to-Intervention Model; http://www.rtinetwork.org/learn/research/progress- monitoring-within-a-rti-model 5 http://www.pbis.org/research/default.aspx 6 John Larmer and John R. Mergendoller September 2010 | Volume 68 | Number 1 Giving Students Meaningful Work Pages 34-37 “Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning” 7 http://www.steamedu.com/html/about_steam_education.html
  7. 7. 5 First Place Scholars Charter School Room portal. Provide, as Attachment 1, the required criminal background check authorization for each of the individuals listed below. Leadership and Governance. FPSCS will be governed by an independent charter school board that currently includes five existing board members who, in multiple unanimous votes during 2013, documented their intent to seek public charter status8 . Members possess expertise in not-for-profit finance, fundraising, program management, and human resources; elementary teaching; facilities management; construction; and business development. Board members with additional areas of expertise will be recruited. Full Name Current Job Title and Employer Position with Proposed School Sheri Day Former Office Manager for American Friends Service Committee, Inc. Board President Daniel Seydel Founder/CEO Entrepreneurial Institute of Washington – Business Capacity Building Organization, Principal Platinum Group LLC Business Development Consulting Board Vice President/Chair of Charter School Committee Isabel Landsberg Retired Volunteer (academic advising and private school office management) Board Secretary Larry Crim Real Estate Broker, Windermere Real Estate Board Member Uti Cleveland Elementary Teacher, Seattle Public Schools Board Member 6. Enrollment Summary Complete the following table, removing any rows for grades the school will not serve during the term of the charter. Number of students must include the minimum and maximum planned enrollment per grade per year. Grade Level Number of Students Year 1 2014/15 Year 2 2015/16 Year 3 2016/17 Year 4 2017/18 Year 5 2018/19 At Capacity 2019 K 28 28 28 28 28 28 1 14 28 28 28 28 28 2 14 14 28 28 28 28 3 14 14 14 28 28 28 4 14 14 14 14 28 28 5 14 14 14 14 14 14 Describe the rationale for the number of students and grade levels served in year one and the basis for the growth plan illustrated above. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. 8 Votes included separating out the social service functions from the running of the elementary school; closing the existing elementary school and seeking public charter school status for a new elementary school at the same Central District First Place owned site; and re-naming an existing First Place 501(c)(3) as First Place Scholars Charter School and transitioning non-school based community services to a new 501c3 called First Place Family of Services and forming a new board for that entity.
  8. 8. 6 First Place Scholars Charter School First Place Scholars program, as we expand enrollment of the school, the plan is to expand from the lowest grades up. We’ll begin with restoring Kindergarten and expanding each grade level yearly. WHEN YOU HAVE COMPLETED YOUR ANSWER, LEAVE THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE BLANK.
  9. 9. 7 First Place Scholars Charter School Section 1. Educational Program Design and Capacity (25 pages) Program Overview Summarize the education program, including primary instructional methods and assessment strategies, and any non-negotiable elements of the school model. Briefly describe the evidence that promises success for this program with the anticipated student population. Highlight the culturally responsive aspects of the program. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Program Overview. The target population for First Place Scholars Charter School (FPSCS) is elementary school children living within the City of Seattle, who have experienced trauma as a result of extreme poverty, homelessness or the danger of becoming homeless, and who, in most cases, are performing below grade level. Children we will target to attend FPSCS are in a socio- economic class that is directly correlated with future high school dropout rates. Children targeted to attend FPSCS meet intended requirements of the Washington State Charter School law. FPSCS leaders have long recognized that trauma, as well as poverty, impairs children’s success. The existing First Place [elementary] school has had a 25-year record of teaching traumatized children who live in extreme poverty. Research shows that 26% of children who are poor for at least one year and are not reading proficiently by third grade fail to graduate high school on time. If these children are also living in a neighborhood of concentrated poverty, this rate rises to 35%9 . Furthermore children in poverty disproportionately suffer from trauma.10 Compared to their non-traumatized peers, traumatized children do not perform as well academically and have more behavioral difficulties, therefore increasing the likelihood of dropping out of school.11 The correlation between poverty and failure to graduate on time is sharply reduced when a child is reading on level by third grade12 . Among poor children who are proficient readers in third grade, 88% graduate from high school on time. Thus, we have concluded that a high-quality education in primary grades is essential to close the reading gap for poor children and set them on a trajectory toward on-time high school graduation and college and career readiness and success. From what we know about students living in crisis or with homelessness, many have experienced traumas at such a young age that their reactions to trauma must be intentionally addressed early on to facilitate the student’s ability to function in a classroom. We also know that our elementary school students need to have these traumas addressed at an early age to ensure they are able to successfully grow and develop. According to “The Characteristics and Needs of Families Experiencing Homelessness” from the National Center of Family Homelessness, “by age twelve, 83% of homeless children had been exposed to at least one serious 9 Hernandez, D. (2012) Double Jeopardy: How Third-Grade Reading Skills and Poverty Influence High School Graduation. Lesnick, J., et al. (2010) Reading on Grade Level in Third Grade: How is it Related to High School Performance and College Enrollment? Krashen (2002) Poverty has a Powerful Impact on Educational Attainment, or, Don’t Trust Ed Trust (Substance, Chicago, IL) 10 Cooper, J. (2007) Facts About Trauma for Policymakers Children's Mental Health. 11 G. Griffin, “Child Trauma and Juvenile Justice: Prevalence, Impact and Treatment” [webinar of the Justice Center for the Council of State Governments (8/3/11)]; R. Stolorow, Trauma and Human Existence (2007). 12 Hernandez (2012), et al
  10. 10. 8 First Place Scholars Charter School violent event” and “among school-age homeless children, 47% have problems such as anxiety, depression, and withdrawal, compared to 18% of other school age children13 . This application takes clear direction from research on high-poverty schools and students by Mass Insight and University of Chicago (as discussed in Cantor et al 2010), which have indicated that, essential systems of student support cannot be separated from academics: These are “systems of student support and development of a productive climate for teaching and learning, including school-wide safety and order, well-managed classrooms, supportive adult-student relationships, a pro-social peer culture, collaborative family connections, and effective use of community services.14 ” Based on 25 years of experience teaching students in poverty, and consistent with research on teaching students in poverty, FPSCS’s curriculum and instructional design choices employ the original First Place [elementary] school’s experience in developing and delivering an integrated system of education, mental health, and family support to best meet the needs of elementary school children who have experienced trauma as a result of extreme poverty, homelessness or danger of becoming homeless, and who may be performing below grade level. FPSCS’s educational framework, enrichment services, and school culture are designed to stabilize students within the first year of enrollment, foster strong successful engagement in the schooling process, and then allow students to soar in academic achievement at an accelerated pace. Furthermore we have learned that our anticipated student population – like most students – makes the greatest progress when they are: able to focus on learning, invested in their schooling, met at their instructional level, and permitted to find achievement through small moments of success that boost self-efficacy. Additionally, we actively engage parents in their children’s learning process strengthening the likelihood of future success. Curriculum and Instructional Design Propose a framework for instructional design that both reflects the needs of the anticipated population and ensures all students will meet or exceed the state standard. 1. Describe the basic learning environment (e.g., classroom-based, independent study), including class size and structure. 2. Provide an overview of the planned curriculum, including, as Attachment 2, a sample course scope and sequence for one subject for each division (elementary, middle, high school) the school will serve. In addition, identify course outcomes and demonstrate alignment with applicable state standards. 3. Evidence that the educational program or key elements of the program are based on proven methods; evidence that the proposed educational program has a sound base in research, theory, and/or experience, and has been or is likely to be rigorous, engaging, and effective for the anticipated student population. 4. If the curriculum is fully developed, summarize curricular choices such as textbook selection, by subject, and the rationale for each. Describe the evidence that these curricula will be appropriate and effective for the targeted students. 13 http://www.familyhomelessness.org/media/306.pdf 14 Pamela A. Cantor, M.D.; Deborah S. Smolover, J.D.; Joan K. Stamler, (2010). Innovative Designs for Persistently Low-Performing Schools: Transforming Failing Schools by Addressing Poverty- Related Barriers to Teaching and Learning; http://turnaroundusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/TFC-Aspen-Institute-Paper-1-0-Aug-2010.pdf
  11. 11. 9 First Place Scholars Charter School 5. If the curriculum is not already developed, provide, as Attachment 3, a plan for how the curriculum will be developed between approval of the application and the opening of the school, including who will be responsible and when key stages will be completed. 6. Describe the primary instructional strategies that the school will expect teachers to use and why they are well-suited for the anticipated student population. Describe the methods and systems teachers will have for providing differentiated instruction to meet the needs of all students. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Curriculum and Instructional Design Capacity. The core components of FPSCS’s education program thoughtfully integrate building students’ basic academic skills by focusing on ‘learning to learn,’ self-efficacy, and understanding of cross cutting 21st Century skills15 along with the development and mastery of core content knowledge through a vertically and horizontally aligned elementary curriculum (based on core content standards including Common Core State Standards in math and English Language Arts, Next Generation Science Standards, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies). In order that we address our goal of demonstrating that students who attend FPSCS for two or more years leave fifth grade proficient in all subjects, our students must accelerate their academic achievement over a two- to three-year period. To do this, staff will integrate instructional strategies based on a backward design curriculum / lesson plan process and use of formative assessment to guide differentiation for each student. Furthermore our staff will employ school wide Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS)16 practices and investigate other social-emotional curricula and behavioral supports. Response to Intervention (RTI)17 strategies; technology applications to accelerate skill development for differentiation / personalization of learning; and extended day project based enrichment instruction18 in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM)19 . 15 Partnership for 21st Century Skills: http://www.p21.org/index.php 16 http://www.pbis.org/research/default.aspx 17 Douglas D. Dexter, Ph.D., and Charles Hughes, Ph.D., Penn State University Progress Monitoring Within a Response-to-Intervention Model; http://www.rtinetwork.org/learn/research/progress- monitoring-within-a-rti-model 18 John Larmer and John R. Mergendoller September 2010 | Volume 68 | Number 1Giving Students Meaningful Work Pages 34-37 “Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning” 19 http://www.steamedu.com/html/about_steam_education.html
  12. 12. 10 First Place Scholars Charter School Figure I:Education Program Logic Model We are currently investigating several curricular frameworks that will address our students’ critical literacy and numeracy needs, at their current levels of understanding and achievement, with a focus on student growth. Based on the need to combine current student learning levels with acceleration of student growth, as monitored on a weekly basis, we are examining curriculum models such as I-Read, Accelerated Reader, Reading A-Z leveled reading framework, Fountas and Pinnell phonics study and ST Math and Dreambox Math to be coupled with strategies from Columbia Teachers’ College Readers and Writers Workshop strategies20 , Mike Schmoker’s, Focus: Elevating the Essentials to Radically Improve Student Learning, Dough Lemov and Norman Atkins’ Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College (K-12), Marilyn Burns Do the Math and Math Talks, the Literacy Collaborative’s work,21 and Balanced Literacy; and Explode the Code, iEARN, and Focus Math online intervention systems. As mentioned above, one of the blended software programs we are considering during our curriculum development period is Dreambox math. A sample scope and sequence for kindergarten appears in the table below. 20 http://www.heinemann.com/fountasandpinnell/default.aspx and http://www.heinemann.com/products/E00871.aspx 21 Marie Clay (1979, 2004) and build upon by the reputable Dr. Irene Fountas and Dr. Gay Su Pinnell. What we Invest: -Staff -Volunteers -Time -Money -Materials to illustrate -Curriculum -Professional Development -Funders -Community Inputs What we do -Teachers plan their lessons with each of their student’s skill level in mind. -consistent school-wide socio-emotional development -Repetition -Hands on experience/visual arts material/ training -technology as lesson hooks -emphasize self expression to build confidence -intentionality with planning and intervention -homework designed for practice only Who we reach -First Place Students -First Place parents -Staff -Volunteers -Partners -Community Based Organizations Outputs Activities Participation Outcomes-Impact Short Term Medium Term Long-Term Short Term Results -Self Confidence -student spends less time out of class -increased attendance -increased engagement with education -student develops relationship with teacher -collaborative plan to address gaps in education created -health concerns posing barriers to education are reduced. Medium Term Results -Student is able to able to appropriately express emotions -increased educational engagement -student show educational progress -health concerns posing barriers to education are reduced. Long Term Results -Students at or above grade level after graduating FP -FP alumni high school completion & college acceptance Student able to advocate for their needs in -health concerns posing barriers to education are reduced. To provide all student from diverse backgrounds/ experiences a structured/ predictable school environment meeting their socio- emotional & academic needs through small class size, curriculum flexibility and differentiation built into each lesson. Case managers work with families to stabilize living situations, providing student continuity. Priorities
  13. 13. 11 First Place Scholars Charter School Table 1:Dream Box Math Kindergarten Scope and Sequence (Example) Dream Box Math Kindergarten Scope and Sequence Pre-K - KINDERGARTEN UNITS Comparisons and Ordering • Compare 1 to 10. Students compare sets of 1 to 10 objects and identify which is more and/or less. • Identify More, Less, and Equal. Students compare flashed sets and numerals of 1 to 10 objects and identify the set that is more, less, and/or equal. • Ordering Numbers. Students order numbers and identify missing numbers in decades from 1 to 100. Counting • Build 1 to 10 Optimally. Students build and identify numbers from static and flashed sets of 1 to 10 objects using the least number of mouse clicks. • Doubles and Near Doubles. Students build and identify numbers from 1 to 20 that are grouped as doubles and near doubles. Addition and Subtraction • Identify Missing Addend. Students identify a missing part (addend) when given one part (addend) and a whole (sum) from 3 to 10. • Beginning Adding and Removing. Students build and identify amounts that are 0, 1, or 2 more or less than a given quantity of 0 to 10. • Identify Number Pairs. Students identify sets of objects and pairs of numbers that add up to 8, 9, and 10. Starting in December 2014, we will begin a seven-month process that involves both internal school staff and external experts to backwards map the K-5 curriculum starting with one grade level at a time and aligning it with Common Core State Standards in math and English Language Arts, Next Generation Science Standards, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies and cross cutting skill development (learning to learn, 21st Century Skills, etc.) using Jay McTighe’s backward design mapping / lesson planning for curriculum development22 . These grade-level maps will include core subject planning maps that outline year round subject benchmarks, curriculum pacing, tracked outcomes, priority standards, and essential questions assigned to those standards. These plans will backward plan towards 22 Wiggins and Tighe, Understanding By Design, Pearson (2005)
  14. 14. 12 First Place Scholars Charter School reaching school outcome goals, and looked at in conjunction with data and formative assessments to monitor overall class progress. These curricula have been initially identified because they are designed to meet students at their individual academic level, cultivate a student culture of rigor and independent learning (which meets our mission of student self-efficacy, and academic acceleration, growth and rigor) and allows our teachers to target instructional expectations to different levels and types of student learning as well as to accelerate student learning. These curriculum guides in their most current versions directly align themselves to the Common Core as well as reinforce our 21st century learning Outcomes. Our plan during winter 2014, beginning in December 2013, is included in Attachment #3, and will include steps indicating that, for each month, we will for a different grade level (starting in December 2013 with kindergarten) do the following: write scopes and sequences; Course Maps with outcomes; standards and essential questions; and Unit Plans with guiding essential questions, assessments, and interventions for Special Ed and ELL and resources. All subject matter will be current and culturally relevant to issues that have a direct impact on our student population. For example, in our recent past history, students in upper grades (4th-5th ) will put on an annual production of a Shakespeare play. With the help of local writing and tutoring program, 826 Seattle, students will translate Shakespeare’s language into modern English, then rehearse, memorize and finally perform the play to a packed auditorium full of students, their families, staff and community members. Additionally, in the upper grades, to promote student self-advocacy, students will engage in their own self-assessments. Student practices include having full knowledge of their reading levels, goal setting and tracking progress, and evaluating skills including books reports, essay opinion writing, and reading logs. Teachers assume strong guidance and mentorship roles with students while individual progress is tracked. Additionally, teachers will direct formal assessments, parent conferencing, and guide students on techniques that accelerate their reading progress. To support our 21st learning outcomes in literacy, much of the core text reading will be student driven and project-based. The purpose of this instructional framework is to allow students to have independent practice in the foundational skills of the 21st century learning outcomes. For example, political engagement will be used as a vehicle for sharpening analytical and writing skills as well as increasing students’ self-efficacy. Each year, our upper grades will take part in an intensive civics research project. Students will review legislative bills likely to come before the state legislature in the next session, choose a bill they passionately support or oppose and then research and write a persuasive letter to legislators. Students and their parents will also receive training on how to engage with their community, and advocate on their own behalf. Once preparation is complete, students, teachers and parents will travel to Olympia where they will meet with individual legislators and their aides. Students will also run for student government, write and deliver campaign speeches, and take responsibility for hearing and addressing student issues. Student Performance Standards Responses to the following items regarding the proposed school’s student performance standards must be consistent with state standards. 1. Describe the student performance standards for the school as a whole. 2. Provide the school’s plan for using internal and external assessments to measure and report student progress. 3. If the applicant plans to adopt or develop additional academic standards beyond the state standards, provide an explanation of the types of standards (content areas, grade levels). Be sure to highlight how the proposed standards exceed the state standards.
  15. 15. 13 First Place Scholars Charter School 4. Explain the policies and standards for promoting students from one grade to the next. Discuss how and when promotion and graduation criteria will be communicated to parents/guardians and students. 5. Provide, as Attachment 4 the school’s exit standards for graduating students. These should clearly set forth what students in the last grade served will know and be able to do. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Student Performance Standards. Consistent with our mission, vision, commitments, and education design, FPSCS’s student learning goals and expectations of growth will be based on both the academic and emotional health of our students, unlike other traditional school models. Our three goals are to: 1) increase students’ skills, ability, and self-efficacy to address their social and emotional challenges; 2) accelerate each student’s academic performance as demonstrated by monitoring academic growth on a weekly basis; and, 3) demonstrate that students who attend FPSCS for two or more years leave fifth grade proficient in all subjects Teachers will set high expectations for classroom goals that strive to build student self-esteem and makes visible student overall growth and academic progress in a supportive environment. Students will track and share with their families their own academic achievements. For many students this means being prideful of their knowledge in basic skills like sight word knowledge, fluency scores, spelling rate, reading levels, and math facts. Teachers and students will also set behavior measures and social-emotional growth goals – within the protocols of PBIS – such as making progress during independent practice as a social-emotional growth target for students who otherwise struggle to engage as part of whole group or small group instruction. [See Figure I below.] Our performance expectations are based on student annual progress on Washington state learning outcomes, which include Common Core State Standards in English and Mathematic as measured through Smarter Balanced formative and summative and classroom designed assessments. For social and emotional assessment, FPSCS will research and adopt a tailored assessment system that addresses traumas associated with extreme poverty. We have already begun researching two Pacific Northwest programs, which have addressed a system of social-emotional assessments for schools to use when addressing trauma. These programs are Project Five, developed by the University of Oregon, and the Washington State University ACES Screening and Assessment project.23 23 http://pages.uoregon.edu/ttobin/measure2.pdf.
  16. 16. 14 First Place Scholars Charter School Figure II: Leading and Lagging Indicators for Student Performance High School Graduation Requirements (High Schools Only) FPSCS is a Kindergarten through 5th grade Elementary School. School Calendar and Schedule 1. Discuss the annual academic schedule for the school. Explain how the calendar reflects the needs of the educational program. In Attachment 5, provide the school’s proposed calendar for the first year of operation, including total number of days/hours of instruction at a minimum of 180 days. 2. Describe the structure of the school day and week. Include the number of instructional hours/ minutes in a day for core subjects such as language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Note the length of the school day, including start and dismissal times. Explain why the school’s daily and weekly schedule will be optimal for student learning. Provide the minimum number of hours/minutes per day and week that the school will devote to academic instruction in each grade. Provide, also in Attachment 5, a sample daily and weekly schedule for each division of the school. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. School Calendar and Schedule. Following Seattle Public School system’s academic calendar, FPSCS’s school year will be segmented into quarters. The Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters will involve core instruction -- 75-minute blocks each of math and English Language Arts instruction daily -- and small blocks of enrichment interventions. The after-school enrichment program will focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, the arts, and mathematics (STEAM) sessions with full-time project based experiential learning and field studies. This will be coupled with community partnerships that provide intensive one-to-one and small group instruction tutoring. At the turn of each quarter formal assessments will be administered and data reviewed to evaluate our whole school academic achievement, reassess student’s Personal Learning Plans, and discuss intervention services. With Extended days FPSCS’s students will be experiencing 8.5 hours of learning 5 days a week (average 40 hours per week) while observing the holidays and teacher development breaks that appear on the Seattle Public School calendar. Outcomes-Impact Short Term Medium Term Long-Term Short Term Results -Self Confidence -student spends less time out of class -increased attendance -increased engagement with education -student develops relationship with teacher -collaborative plan to address gaps in education created -health concerns posing barriers to education are reduced. Medium Term Results -Student is able to able to appropriately express emotions -increased educational engagement -student show educational progress -health concerns posing barriers to education are reduced. Long Term Results -Students at or above grade level after graduating FP -FP alumni high school completion & college acceptance Student able to advocate for their needs in -health concerns posing barriers to education are reduced.
  17. 17. 15 First Place Scholars Charter School 2014-2015 School Calendar **First Place will base breaks and parent teacher conferences on the Seattle Public Schools calendar. Childcare providers in Seattle are open during school breaks. First Place aligns breaks to ensure families needed childcare would have access. • Proposed opening day- September 3rd 2014 • No School Monday November 11th –Veterans Day • Parent Teacher Conferences- likely no school Monday November 24th , 25th , 26th • No School November 27th and 28th for Thanksgiving Holiday • Winter Break- likely Monday December 22nd through January 2nd • No School January 19th - Martin Luther King Day • No School February 16th - President’s Day • Mid-Winter Break- based on SPS- likely February 17th through 20th • Parent Teacher Conferences March 30th through April 3rd • Spring Break April 6th through April 10th • No School May 25th – Memorial Day • Summer Break 1- (start date will be based on SPS last day of school) Possibly June 22nd through July 3rd • 6 week of summer enrichment begins July 6th and ends on August 14th • Summer Break 2- August 17th until 1st day of school (about 2 ½ weeks) First Place students will attend school a minimum of 182 days.
  18. 18. 16 First Place Scholars Charter School Table 2:School Schedule Regular School Day Extended School Day For a Student 8am-8:40am Arrival and Breakfast 8:40am-9:00am Whole School Community Meeting 9am-10:30am Reading Block 10:30am-11:30am Writing Block 11:30am-12:30pm Whole School Community Meal and Recess with I.A.s 12:30pm-1:45pm Math and Science Block 1:45pm-2:15pm Upper Grades Study Hall; Lower Grade Learning Clubs; Intervention Groups 2:15pm-2:30pm Snack/Recess 2:30pm-4:30pm STEAM Rotational Electives: Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math 6 week modules led by a teacher with community partners, experts, and volunteers For a Teacher 8:10m-8:40am Arrival and 30min plan period 8:40am-9:00am Whole School Community Meeting 9am-10:30am Reading Block 10:30am-11:30am Writing Block 11:30am-12:00pm Whole School Community Meal 12:00pm-12:30pm Lunch 12:30pm-1:45pm Math and Science Block 1:45pm-2:15pm Upper Grades Study Hall I.A. monitored; Lower Grade Learning Clubs I.A. monitored; Intervention Groups teacher directed across grade levels 2:15pm-2:30pm Whole School Snack Learning Break 2:30pm-4:30pm STEAM Block – Some teachers leading 6 week enrichment class modules; others working in PLCs, professional development, and reviewing student data and planning
  19. 19. 17 First Place Scholars Charter School School Culture 1. Describe the culture of the proposed school. Explain how it will promote a positive academic environment and reinforce student intellectual and social development. 2. Explain how you will create and implement this culture for students, teachers, administrators, and parents/guardians starting from the first day of school. Describe the plan for acculturating students who enter the school mid-year. 3. Explain how the school culture will take account of and serve students with special needs, including students receiving special education services, English Language learners, and any students at risk of academic failure. 4. Describe a typical school day from the perspective of a student in a grade that will be served in your first year of operation. 5. Describe a typical day for a teacher in a grade that will be served in your first year of operation. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. School Culture. Our culture is designed to build children’s strength of character in terms of: • Service, courage, humility, resilience, academic grit and achievement, agency, originality, and leadership; • Involve each child’s family in FPSCS’s learning community; • Connect students and their families to supportive services within and external to the school; • Provide a safe, culturally rich, and supportive haven for students and their families; • Ensure professional learning, development, responsibility, accountability, quality, and deportment; and • Model diversity, stewardship, and compassion. Many of the anticipated FPSCS families, often as a result of their circumstances, have not been able to engage positively in traditional school systems. The school climate at FPSCS, building on the existing First Place [elementary] school’s experience, will continue as one in which parents are regarded as experts about their children, welcomed, and supported. FPSCS serves as an education home to our students and as a place of encouragement, support, and academic success. The curriculum and content standards, and three school goals24 – along with a carefully crafted education program – are designed to make sure staff, leadership, volunteers, and partners are all poised to jointly insist on and ensure that students’ family circumstances do not serve as an obstacle: students at FPSCS will learn and be supported in an environment focused on excelling academically, developing academic grit, and directing students’ resilience from being used to survive to enabling their academic acceleration. First and foremost, FPSCS will be a school; but a school that both provides and connects students and families to and with internal and external services and resources while placing student learning front and center [refer also to family and community involvement section].25 To accomplish mental health stability and academic acceleration, the FPSCS K-5 school will use a full inclusion classroom of 12-14 students under the direction of a lead teacher. In-classroom instruction time is heavily weighted on mastery of core subjects, student 24 1) increase students’ skills, ability, and self-efficacy to address their social and emotional challenges; 2) accelerate each student’s academic performance as demonstrated by monitoring academic growth on a weekly basis; and, 3) demonstrate that students who attend FPSCS for two or more years leave fifth grade proficient in all subjects. 25 Connected to the Community, by Marianne Smith and Jan Osborn
  20. 20. 18 First Place Scholars Charter School self-efficacy, character building, and ‘learning to learn’ skills. Classrooms will be supported by a host of interventions and enrichment, with each classroom having a dedicated instructional aide; including a designated special education aide to service high needs student interventions within the classroom. Case managers, Title I services, special education teachers, health care professionals, and mental health professionals will be in-house and available to work with students. These support services will build in collaborative time with teachers so mental health staff can participate in our wrap-around services. Additionally, our extended day programming will provide students with a unique approach to apply their basic, core content, and character skills into a project based learning setting that brings in outside volunteers, partners, and experts – to work alongside FPSCS teachers and instructional aides – in a fun, safe, and experimental program setting. Designed to prepare staff and students for academic success, FPSCS will have small class sizes, mental health support, personalized family case management, curriculum instruction, extended day, and rigorous focus on mastery of basic learning skills and core subjects. FPSCS is predicated on putting students’ – and their families’ –life circumstances first, because of a basic shared belief that, without stability and security in daily home life, students are distracted from learning and unable to reach their academic potential. As an example, teachers will serve as a conduit in partnership with Case Managers to disseminate information about community services and engagement opportunities. Case Managers will have a reciprocal role with teachers in that they provide information on community engagement, services, and field study opportunities that best support the students and parents. With the help of case managers, families can be referred to attain services and supported in follow through of those services getting to families. This wrap-around model of education and social services (including connecting families to a sister organization, First Place Family of Services) involves case managers to help parents or guardians enter stable housing, find employment complete their own education, and advocate for their children’s education. The school’s mental health department partners with local universities and mental health agencies to provide individual counseling, testing, and group therapy to our students. Our volunteer department matches every child with a mentor from the community based on an assessment of the child’s personality and needs. Our teachers develop specialized knowledge in the needs of traumatized children and deliver culturally-responsive curriculum to support children with disabilities and English language learners along with a diverse array of youth struggling with various individual traumas. Our extended-day program will: • Provide a variety of project based lessons for students; • Extend their time at their “education home;” • Expose them to adult experts from outside of their “education home;” and Allow for parents to participate in workshops – through the Parent Advisory Council (PAC) – designed to help with their own concerns and with learning how to support their children’s learning goals [see Family and Community Involvement Section]. Supplemental Programming 1. If after-school or summer school will be offered, describe the program(s). Explain the schedule and length of the program including the number of hours and weeks. Discuss the anticipated participants including number of students and the methods used to identify them. What are the anticipated resource and staffing needs for these programs? 2. Describe the extra- or co-curricular activities or programming the school will offer; how often they will occur; and how they will be delivered and funded. 3. Describe the programs or strategies to address student mental, emotional, and social development and health.
  21. 21. 19 First Place Scholars Charter School 4. If applicable, describe any other student-focused activities and programs that are integral to the educational and student- development plans. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Supplementary Programming. Mentoring Program. FPSCS will build on the past 14 years of a First Place [elementary] School onsite mentoring program. The program will continue to involve a community member to work one-on-one with a student for one hour a week. The mentor provides their student with an opportunity to have a stable relationship that helps to support their emotional and academic needs. The mentor assists in helping the child set goals, and monitoring progress throughout the school year or for as long as the student attends FPSCS. Mentoring matches are made based on an interview with a prospective mentor and the personality of the student. With parent consent, mentors are assigned by early October every school year. Previous mentoring matches are maintained, when the student and mentor continues to be enrolled at FPSCS. Extended Day Program. The FPSCS regular school day model will be augmented through an extended day program (see graphic), which will occur from 2:30 to 4:30pm Monday through Friday. Currently, partnerships are being renegotiated to help with the extended-day including STEAM project based learning enrichment program. Each teacher will be responsible for producing a whole school community engagement piece and will lead a six-week STEAM enrichment module delivered with the help of volunteers, partners, and instructional aides. Arts Program. The arts include innovation and creativity through the development of a play from start to performance. Students will work together with volunteers to write a script, design sets, design costumes, and direct a play to be performed at the end of the extended year program. We will partner with 826, a volunteer writing company, which will help our students develop a script of a classic play. The students in the upper classes will help lead the other students in the school in the design and implementation of a plan for accomplishing the tasks. At the end of a particular module, the students will perform the play for families, friends, staff, mentors, and volunteers. Physical Education Program. We plan to partner with the School of Acrobatics, New Circus Arts (Sanca), and a local swimming pool to keep our students active. At Sanca, students participate in tumbling and acrobatic activities, engaging their full body, mind and creativity for an entire week. The activities are non-competitive; students have the ability to challenge themselves with every class and learn new skills as they learn to master control over their bodies. Furthermore, partnerships with Seattle Parks & Recreation allow for students to participate in swimming, which is a full body, aerobic exercise that will help our students maintain healthy bodies. Science Program. The science component will focus on student’s curiosity by participating in hands on projects. Students will learn about the components necessary to grow the food we eat, ecosystems, how rockets work, etc. We plan on having the students work within their age groups to explore and use the scientific method to answer critical questions in each of the interest areas, integrating critical thinking, math, reading and writing. Students will present their findings to friends and family at the end of the module. In addition to the STEAM components, extended day scheduling allows for: • Accelerated small-group instruction in math to raise academic achievement for students below grade level and provide
  22. 22. 20 First Place Scholars Charter School challenges for gifted students; • Reading and language arts activities; • One-on-one mentoring; • Accelerated language skills instruction for English Language Learners; • Programs that directly address the needs of students with disabilities, including one-on-one tutoring, counseling, technology-based accelerated instruction or other methods appropriate to the specific disability; • Youth Leadership activities, including student engagement in the design and delivery of the program; and • Character education and counseling programs. Health & Mental Health Program. First Place will provide a health education program designed to teach developmentally appropriate topics and to lay the groundwork for students to have the knowledge and skills to make healthy choices as they grow older. Our school nurse will conduct initial health screenings on all students, checking height, weight, vision, hearing, and calculate the student’s Body Mass Index (BMI) The school nurse will assist in the classroom for a program similar to the health curriculum, Great Body Shop, as well as the Family Life and Sexual Health curriculum in the 4th and 5th grade classrooms to help students to learn about their bodies. The nurse will also be a critical member of the health of the school. Besides being available for injuries, the nurse will be an integral member of the Collective Care team, bringing a holistic view of our students and their families. As we know, health can greatly impact a student’s ability to be successful in the classroom. The partnership between and among the school nurse, case manager, teacher and parent will help to prevent health issues from surfacing and immediately address ones that arise. FPSCS will also have a support services manager who will work with teachers and family case managers to ensure that each child’s needs are met such as addressing issues to prevent escalation, assisting with crisis intervention, providing technical assistance to staff, overseeing student groups, and supervising interns. Doctoral interns in psychology will provide services ranging from classroom observations, academic and behavioral testing, work with individual students, and delivery of art and group therapy. In evaluating students, their expertise will help families and staff distinguish between learning disabilities and academic difficulties caused by trauma. At the same time, families will be important partners and needed to provide input about their children’s skills and behaviors outside school. Thus, the assessment process will provide the opportunity for a comprehensive understanding of the student’s needs. The same approach will be used for students who are gifted.
  23. 23. 21 First Place Scholars Charter School Figure III: Collective Care Logic Model We will deploy two multidisciplinary teams, our Residency Team and our Collective Care Team. Our Residency Team will be composed of the lead teacher, teachers, case managers, school psychologists, student teachers, social work interns, and psychology interns. They will meet twice a month to discuss students of concern. In these discussions, participants will provide their observations of the child’s strengths and challenges, asks questions, and offers potential strategies that will lead to an intervention plan. The interventions can include additional testing, coordination with the parent, or discussions with the student. The Collective Care team includes the Principal, support services manager, school nurse, a case manager, and special education teacher. The Collective Care team will follow up with Residency Teams if larger-scale interventions are needed. This group will also determine the need for school-wide interventions or policy changes unrelated to Residency Teams. FPSCS will also connect families to ongoing mental health support through community-based mental health programs. Special Populations and At-Risk Students Schools are responsible for hiring licensed and endorsed special educators pursuant to law. School personnel shall participate in developing Individualized Education Programs (IEPs); identify and refer students for assessment of special education needs; maintain records; and cooperate in the delivery of special education instruction and services, as appropriate. All responses should indicate how the school will comply with applicable laws and regulations governing service to these student populations. 1. Describe the overall plan to serve students with special needs, including but not limited to students with Individualized Education Programs or Section 504 plans; English Language learners; students identified as intellectually gifted; and students at risk of academic failure or dropping out. The plan should address how the school will meet students’ needs in the least restrictive environment. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Special Populations and At-Risk Students. The academic achievement data in Washington State demonstrate the need for high- quality elementary schools designed to accelerate the achievement of students in poverty. Washington has 533 high-poverty
  24. 24. 22 First Place Scholars Charter School elementary schools (i.e. schools in which at least 50% of students receive free or reduced lunches)26 . These schools are struggling to produce proficient third grade readers. In the 2011/12 school year, only 56.5% of these struggling schools’ third graders passed the state Measurement of Student Progress (MSP) in reading, compared to 68.8% of all third graders. In Seattle, third graders in high poverty schools have a 56.8% passing rate on the MSP reading, as compared to 74% passing rate of all third graders. In terms of equity, Seattle is doing worse in comparison to the state as a whole.27 The statistics are worse at schools educating the very poorest students. In Seattle, 13 schools have at least 80% of students on Free and Reduced Lunch. Just 52.4% of third-graders in these schools read at grade level. The only Seattle school with a comparable poverty rate to the existing First Place [elementary] school has been Martin Luther King, Jr., Elementary, having 91.4% of their students on the Free and Reduced Lunch program. Just 45.3% of its third graders passed the MSP reading test28 . In the 2012/1329 school year, 97% of the existing First Place [elementary] school students received free lunches and 67% were homeless at the start of the year (with just 44% remaining homeless by year’s end). Furthermore, 54% were African American; 8% were Asian or Pacific Islanders; 3% were Native American; 3% were European American; 1.5 % were Latino; 28% were multiracial; 13% would have been assessed to determine whether they were eligible for ELL services; 25% received Title 1 tutoring; and 11.5% of students received support services through individualized education plans. The existing First Place school has been, and FPSCS will continue to be the only school other than Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary in Seattle that has a focus on educating the poorest students. FPSCS will be the only school that approaches educating these children in a holistic way recognizing that trauma may be a key reason for academic failure. 2. Identify the special populations and at-risk groups and at-risk groups that the school expects to serve, whether through data related to the targeted district or neighborhood or more generalized analysis of the population to be served. Discuss how the course scope and sequence, daily schedule, staffing plans, and support strategies and resources will meet or be adjusted for the diverse needs of students. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. First Place Scholars Charter School (FPSCS) embodies the Washington State imperative of educating “at-risk students” (WAC Title 108-10-030). We will continue to recruit elementary-age children, from those entering kindergarten up to and including those entering fifth grade. The majority of our children, as described above, will comply with the portion of the WAC definition that states, “…the students will require assistance or special services to succeed in their educational programs.” The majority of the existing students, and those who will likely attend FPSCS. are currently living in poverty. In the beginning 2012-2013 academic year, 97%of the students received free lunches and 67% met the federal definition of homeless. Traditionally, the current First Place serves some of the poorest students Further, as shown in the response above, the majority of the students and their families have experience numerous types and degrees of trauma as a result of their life circumstances, Thus our school will require holistic special services (i.e., education programs, mental and physical health services) to address students who enter below grade level, 26 School Report Card, http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/ 27 http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/). 28 http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/ 29 These demographics for the 2012/13 school year include all students who came to First Place, regardless when they enrolled or withdrew. As our students are highly mobile, this number does not represent the number of students at First Place at any specific time.
  25. 25. 23 First Place Scholars Charter School are English language learners and, if not addressed in a holistic, are at risk for low academic success. The students’ diverse needs will be met through a model of a maximum of 14 students per classroom with the support of a teacher and instructional aide. The scope and sequence will allow the time and flexibility to slow down or speed up for subjects, when necessary. Classroom based assessments will be administered in order to adjust scope and sequence. The daily schedule will allow for consistent routine and structure, which is necessary for students who have experienced trauma. The support strategies for students and families at FPSCS will include case management for all families, mentors, mental health services and physical health screenings for all students, all working towards the long-term stabilization of each student. All support strategies will be tailored and adapted for the needs of the family being served. 3. Explain more specifically how you will identify and meet the learning needs of students with mild, moderate, and severe disabilities in the least restrictive environment possible. Specify the programs, strategies, and supports you will provide, including the following: a. Methods for identifying students with special education needs (and avoiding misidentification); b. Specific instructional programs, practices, and strategies the school will employ to provide a continuum of services; ensure students’ access to the general education curriculum; and ensure academic success for students with special education needs; c. Plans for monitoring and evaluating the progress and success of special education students with mild, moderate, and severe needs to ensure the attainment of each student’s goals as set forth in the Individualized Education Program (IEP); d. Plans for promoting graduation for students with special education needs (high school only); and e. Plans for qualified staffing adequate for the anticipated special needs population. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. At FPSCS, we recognize that individual education programs can be a tremendous help to students with learning disabilities. However, often students are inappropriately screened and referred to special education before other alternatives and key factors are fully vetted. We are particularly aware of the fact that African-American males are over-identified for behavioral disorders. This is a key part of the school to prison pipeline which we are determined to avoid. We also recognize that students, once sent to special education, sometimes do not emerge from special education the rest of their schooling. Our goal is to use special education services when they are absolutely necessary and for only as long as they are absolutely necessary. FPSCS will have systems in place to ensure students who may need special services do not fall through the cracks. First and foremost, is the parent. Often during intake, parents will disclose academic or behavioral challenges. Second, parents bring in students before school starts to be assessed in reading and math. A student’s scores may raise a concern for learning challenges. These scores will be analyzed by the lead teacher to determine level of concern. Finally, twice a month Residency Teams composed of FPSCS teachers, case managers, mental health director, director of volunteer services, psychology interns, social work interns, and teaching interns will meet to discuss students of concern. Often the Residency Team another screening for students with possibility learning challenges. Any one of these may be a route to the Collective Care Team. The Collective Care Team will include our principal/lead teacher, special education teacher, mental health director, director of volunteer services, case manager, school nurse and, in cases where ELL is a consideration, an ELL endorsed teacher. When
  26. 26. 24 First Place Scholars Charter School concerns are brought to the team, each member provides observations, questions and expertise, ensuring a holistic view of the student. Through this process, the team recommends a course of action. This course of action can include classroom intervention strategies, Title 1 services, parent intervention, mental health services, and additional internal testing (our Antioch psychology students support FPSCS in conducting academic and/or behavioral assessments). These internal assessments provide a deeper insight into the student’s strengths and challenges as a learner. When internal testing is used, it is presented to the Collective Care team as well as a Student Intervention Meeting, with the parent as the key partner. Any further steps are taken only after parental concerns, input, and questions are addressed. It is essential that parents fully understand the report and have an opportunity to discuss the findings. Recommendations from the report can include interventions such as modification of instruction, Title 1 services, mental health counseling, and/or special education services. Two recent examples show how this system works in practice. A student experiencing acute trauma came to First Place exhibiting severe behavior challenges and academic delays. It was not possible to administer the standard academic baseline assessment because the student was unable to answer a single problem. The student’s emotional outbursts consistently disrupted the class. Through intensive interventions with the student and parent, Title 1 services, a mentor, modification of instruction, and high expectations from the school and parent, the student began to make progress. First Place has determined that this student would not be a good candidate for testing for IEP eligibility at this time. Another example involves an African American student for whom we developed an IEP in early primary grades, by 4th grade the student was no longer in special education and passed the reading portion of the MSP. FPSCS explores special education testing only when we have exhausted every possible intervention beforehand. a. In working with families in crisis and transition, we know that our students’ needs are highly unpredictable. Therefore our admissions process is early so that we have as much advance notice of student’s IEPs. Under our process, acceptances are sent out in early spring and families have 15 days to submit required paperwork, including IEPs. This gives us time to conduct the necessary hiring and training to meet the IEPs. FPSCS will also utilize our Collective Care team Residency Teams and Parent Advisory Council to support the parent and general education teacher. Our Parent Advisory Council will play a crucial role in empowering the parent by conducting workshops on the special education system. FPSCS will provide the least restrictive environment for students with IEPs, following these guidelines: • To the maximum extent appropriate, the student is educated with children without disabilities. • Special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of the student from the regular educational environment occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily. • In selecting the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), consideration is given to any potential harmful effect on the student or on the quality of services that he/she needs. • The student with a disability is not removed from the education in age-appropriate classrooms solely because of needed modifications in the general curriculum.
  27. 27. 25 First Place Scholars Charter School FPSCS will work with all students enrolled on bolstering behavioral skills to address academic needs. b. FPSCS will continually monitor and evaluate the progress and success of students receiving special education services. IEPs will be written yearly; they will establish baselines for the student in all qualifying areas. They will be updated quarterly or as needed, whichever is sooner. The special education teacher will maintain consistent communication with the general education teacher, to ensure goals are aligned. When the student meets specially designed goals and objectives, a meeting will convene consisting of the parent, case manager, special education teacher, general education teacher and principal to update the IEP and ensure the student’s goals are challenging. The special education teacher will also participate in the parent-teachers conferences. It is our goal for students to progress towards spending more time in the general education setting. c. (not applicable) d. FPSCS anticipates student’s applying that will have an existing IEP or will need assistance in obtaining an IEP. As FPSCS receives application information, including IEPs, we will have a better understanding of our student’s IEP needs and will be able to hire the appropriate special education teacher. 4. Explain how the school will meet the needs of English Language Learner (ELL) students, including the following: a. Methods for identifying ELL students (and avoiding misidentification); b. Specific instructional programs, practices, and strategies the school will employ to ensure academic success and equitable access to the academic program for these students; c. Plans for monitoring and evaluating the progress and success of ELL students, including exiting students from ELL services; d. Means for providing qualified staffing for ELL students. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. First Place’s initial method for identifying ELL students takes place at intake, before the child starts school. At intake, First Place administers a home language survey, which includes the following questions: • What is the language most frequently spoken at home? • Which language did your child learn when he/she first began to talk? • What language does your child most frequently speak at home? • What language do you most frequently speak to your child? If the home language survey indicates that the child may be an English Language Learner, First Place will follow up by interviewing the parent. In addition, First Place requests and reviews previous schools’ records for each child. If a review of the records indicates that ELL services have been requested or provided to the student previously, this will be considered also. Considering these multiple sources ensures that children are not under-identified as ELL. If this initial body of evidence (survey, interview and/or records) reveals the possibility of ELL, First Place will request parental permission to administer the Washington English Language Proficiency Assessment (WELPA). The WELPA is a detailed assessment that ensures children are neither over-identified nor under-identified as ELL. Moreover, the WELPA is administered
  28. 28. 26 First Place Scholars Charter School yearly to ensure that students who attain Fluent English Proficiency no longer are categorized as ELL. First Place creates individualized Student Learning Plans for each student. In the case of students receiving ELL services, the Student Learning Plan includes an English Language Acquisition Plan (ELAP). The ELL-endorsed teacher and the staff that will be working directly with the student will develop the ELAP with input from the parent. The ELAP states specific goals and objectives, including a projected date by which the student will achieve fluency. The ELAP also includes academic history and WELPA scores, specific services to be provided and a list of in-class modifications to instruction and curriculum. The ELAP is reviewed by the Collective Care Team at least yearly. FPSCS will investigate best practices in serving ELL students. It will start with the recommendations from the Bilingual Education Advisory Committee contained in the document A Call for Equity and Excellence for English Language Learners in Washington State, found on the website of the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. It will also stay current with the National Clearinghouse of English Language Instruction, a source of research on best practices. One highly-rated program that FPSCS is considering is the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP), which is research- based and field-tested. Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model by Echevarria, Vogt, and Short. The SIOP model uses an comprehensive lesson-planning checklist to support teachers in planning language development intentionally. Many items on the checklist are hallmarks of excellent teaching in general: linking concepts to students’ backgrounds and experiences; providing pre- and post-reading writing prompts, providing oral language practice before and after writing, and emphasizing key vocabulary. The thirty components of the SIOP lesson-planning checklist can be used with any curriculum or program, for students at any age or level of English proficiency. Experienced teachers recognize the SIOP components as effective teaching strategies for all students. However, it is the systematic use of all components to scaffold content and language instruction that provides the support that ELLs, even those who have "exited" from a special program or service, need to succeed in mainstream classrooms. Finally, FPSCS’s lead teacher has received training in Guided Language Acquisition and Development (GLAD), a research-based model for presenting content through multi-sensory and language-rich lessons and materials. The classroom teacher will regularly use authentic assessments to monitor and evaluate the progress and success of ELL students. The results of these assessments will be addressed each trimester, as the Student Learning Plans are updated. The Collective Care Team will support the classroom teacher in evaluating progress. In addition, FPSCS will administer WELPA every year. FPSCS already has one teacher with an ELL endorsement, and classroom teachers will be required to include ELL training in their professional development. Based on information obtained in the application and enrollment process, FPSCS will determine whether to hire additional ELL-trained teachers to serve its current and incoming students. 5. Explain how the school will identify and meet the learning needs of at-risk students as defined in RCW 28A.710.010(2). “At-risk student" means a student who has an academic or economic disadvantage that requires assistance or special services to succeed in educational programs. The term includes, but is not limited to, students who do not meet minimum standards of academic proficiency, students who are at risk of dropping out of high school, students in chronically low- performing schools, students with higher than average disciplinary sanctions, students with lower participation rates in
  29. 29. 27 First Place Scholars Charter School advanced or gifted programs, students who are limited in English proficiency, students who are members of economically disadvantaged families, and students who are identified as having special educational needs. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. FPSCS, through personalized assessment and individualized attention creates a learning environment to address the needs of the Whole Child and to build capacity in the family to support the success of their student(s). We do this through; assessment; individualized learning; New Student and Parent Orientation. When a family has submitted their required documents, an enrollment appointment will be scheduled for the family during the summer before the school year begins. The purpose of this enrollment appointment is to have the parent/guardian meet and have a discussion with their assigned case manager, mental health director, school nurse and an officer of the Parent Advisory Committee. During this time, the accepted student would complete an academic assessment for a baseline of the student before the first day of school. After the academic assessment, the student would receive his/her clothing referral from our clothing bank and have a brief check in with our school nurse for height, weight, vision, and hearing exam. When meeting with the case manager, the family will complete the prescreening and goals assessment forms thus creating a case plan for the family. The parent/guardian will meet the mental health director to have a brief discussion of their family circumstances and to hear about the services available onsite. The nurse will meet with the parent/guardian to discuss any health barriers, missing immunizations, and medications to be in place by the time the school year begins. The parent/guardian would meet with an officer of our Parent Advisory Committee to discuss the parent involvement requirements, talk about their skills/abilities and how they can contribute the school community. The enrollment appointment would end with a brief discussion with the Principal of their student’s academic assessment results, thus allowing the parent to know their child’s academic strengths and needs. The purpose of the enrollment appointment is to allow the student and parent to begin to build a rapport with the various professionals and practices at FPSCS and link them to additional external services offered by FPSCS Family of Services. At the end of each summer, FPSCS will also hold an orientation for new and returning families. The purpose of the orientation will be for family members and students to meet FPSCS staff and review policies, student expectations, and family expectations. 6. Explain how the school will identify and meet the needs of highly capable students, including the following: a. Specific research-based instructional programs, practices, strategies, and opportunities the school will employ or provide to enhance their abilities; b. Plans for monitoring and evaluating the progress and success of intellectually gifted students; and c. Means for providing qualified staffing for intellectually gifted students. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED. Students FPSCS identifies through initial assessment for being highly capable will be referred for additional testing through our mental health department. They will administer the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and the Woodcock-Johnson assessment, among other possible assessments, to better understand the student’s current academic position. A report regarding the findings will be written and, in a sit-down discussion, will be shared with the parent. This discussion will also involve the classroom teacher as a springboard for providing possible interventions.
  30. 30. 28 First Place Scholars Charter School FPSCS will continue to challenge highly capable students with work at their level, providing enrichment to foster continued academic success through our education program and extended day/extended year program. For example, highly capable students will continue to participate in book clubs with students at their level, regardless of grade assignment. During the regular school day, students may be assigned to advanced math groups and have the option of participating in the older students’ presentation of a Shakespeare play in modern language. Rigorous teacher-created enrichment materials, such as FPSCS’s highly engaging workbook on Greek and Latin roots, will be adapted and provided to appropriate students. Finally, teachers will use research-based strategies such as Independent Learning Contracts, Content Extension Menus and Student-made Learning Centers to challenge students within the regular classroom. S. Winebrenner, Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom (2001). In the extended-day program, technology, electives and the arts will provide extra stimulation and challenge. For students identified as highly capable and transitioning out of FPSCS, the family will work with their case manager to locate advanced programming in their next school. This includes supporting the family in Advanced Learning testing through Seattle Public Schools, area private schools, and Rainier Scholars. It is our goal for student’s transitioning out of FPSCS to enter an academic program that will continue to meet their academic needs with the foundation given at FPSCS. FPSCS will monitor and evaluate the process and success of intellectually gifted students through the same assessments used by other students at FPSCS. As an example, one student who attended First Place came with a record of academic success but social-emotional challenges. The parent reported many trips to the principal’s office in the previous school. The student was assessed by our psychology interns, showing the student was academically advanced in many areas, yet behind in others. The parent, armed with this information, provided targeted reinforcement over the summer. The next fall, follow-up testing revealed that the student had made up all deficiencies and was at or above grade level in all subjects. First Place was able to provide continued academic success for the student through the flexibility of our curriculum, which gave him the opportunity to engage in significant original work in the areas of writing, performing and advocacy. This work included writing dialogue for the school drama productions, writing and presenting speeches in running for student government and advocating both in writing and orally at the state legislature. Student Recruitment and Enrollment 1. Explain the plan for student recruitment and marketing that is culturally inclusive and will provide equal access to interested students and families. Specifically describe the plan for outreach to at-risk students. 2. Provide, as Attachment 6 the school’s Enrollment Policy, which should be culturally inclusive and include the following: a. Tentative dates for application period; and enrollment deadlines and procedures, including explanation of how the school will receive and process Intent to Enroll forms; b. A timeline and plan for student recruitment/engagement and enrollment; c. The lottery procedures that will be used should student interest exceed capacity; d. Policies and procedures for student waiting lists, withdrawals, re-enrollment, and transfers; and e. Explanation of the purpose of any pre-admission activities for students or parents. TYPE YOUR RESPONSE IN THE BOX BELOW, IT WILL EXPAND AS NEEDED.
  31. 31. 29 First Place Scholars Charter School Student Recruitment and Enrollment. Student Eligibility. All students, Kindergarten to 5th grade, are eligible to attend FPSCS. Students must be five years of age by August 31st of the academic year in which the child wishes to attend Kindergarten. We do not test for early admittance to kindergarten. After the first year of charter and launch of FPSCS Scholars, enrollment preference is given to siblings of students currently enrolled at FPSCS. Outreach Procedures. FPSCS will use a broad marketing and outreach strategy to inform the community about our FPSCS Scholars Charter School. We will hold public forums and open houses to inform the community who we are and what makes us different. We will advertise open houses and forums in local community centers, cultural centers, Boys & Girls Clubs, shelters, housing organizations, homeless drop-in centers, inpatient treatment facilities, and government offices. In addition, we will provide this information to Seattle Public Schools family support workers. For organizations with existing community meetings, we would offer to come in and speak directly with the families rather than having all forums at FPSCS. We will advertise the open houses and forums on our website. We will also participate in community events throughout the Central District, South Seattle, and North Seattle areas. Outreach efforts would begin in September and continue through February 28th , the last day to submit an application for the lottery. FPSCS will hold an Open House in the winter to give interested families an opportunity to hear more about the educational programs that will be offered at FPSCS. Selection Procedures. All families interested in having their student attend FPSCS Scholars Charter School will complete a form – or be supported in completing a form – that includes the name, age, grade of each student along with a contact number, two emergency contact numbers, a mailing address and email address if applicable. Families can apply between November 1st and February 28th . In year one, once charter status is confirmed from the Washington Charter School Commission, FPSCS will determine how many applications it has and whether or not the entire school or specific grade levels are oversubscribed, and therefore, if a lottery is required. If charter status is denied or postponed, then FPSCS will notify all applicants immediately. If a lottery is needed, because of excess demand, it will occur in March of each year and families will be notified via mail, and if applicable, email whether their student was accepted or if they are placed on a waitlist, no later than April 1st . Accepted families will be required to submit immunization records, birth certificates, IEP’s, 504 plans, free-reduced lunch application (if applicable) and basic enrollment contact sheet to confirm their space. A case manager will be available to assist in completing the paperwork and obtaining necessary documents. Completed paperwork must be turned in before enrollment. In the first year of charter, all interested applicants, including students enrolled at the existing First Place [elementary] school for 2013-2014 will need to submit an application. FPSCS will extend the deadline for lottery eligibility to March 31, 2014 for enrollment deadline leading into our first year of charter. If by March 31st , FPSCS has more applicants for classroom/grade than space, FPSCS will hold a lottery. The results of the lottery will be communicated by mail or email no later than May 1, 2014. If spaces remain by the March 31st lottery deadline, FPSCS will continue to accept students until all slots are filled. After this, student will be placed on a waitlist. The families will have 15 days to submit the proper documentation. Follow up calls will be made by the school secretary for submitting the documentation. After 15 days, if a family has failed to submit completed documentation, and there is a waitlist, FPSCS will contact the next family on the list. For families who are homeless, a case manager will help coordinate with the parent on obtaining the proper documentation for enrollment. In accordance with the Federal McKinney Vento Act, admissions will not be held up for homeless families based on missing documentation.
  32. 32. 30 First Place Scholars Charter School Once a student has been accepted to FPSCS, they will not have to resubmit letters of intent each year they wish to attend FPSCS. Siblings of current FPSCS students will be given preference in enrollment, as allowed in the Washington State Charter Law. Lottery Procedures.30 The last day to return applications to be eligible for the lottery is February 28th of each winter that precedes the academic year for which a new student is applying. Completed applications can be returned to FPSCS until this date. The application will be date stamped at the front desk, ordered and numbered in the order it was received. An application must be filled out for each student applying to attend FPSCS. In order for an application to be complete it must have the following information: 1) Name, grade, date of birth of each student; 2) Preferred phone contact information for the parent/guardian; 3) Mailing address of the parent/guardian; and 4) An emergency contact phone number and mailing address. If by February 28th , the applications for each grade or specific grades are greater than the spaces available, FPSCS will hold a lottery. As applications are turned in, they are numbered in the order received. This will be the application’s reference number during the lottery. The lottery will be based on capacity in each classroom/grade level. The students not selected by grade in the lottery will be placed on the wait list based on the sequence in which their application was drawn during the lottery. In no way does an original application submission date provide enrollment preference; rather the lottery drawing order indicates who will come off the waitlist first. If the school has been oversubscribed, students applying to FPSCS after the February 28th date will not be eligible for the lottery and will be placed on the waitlist behind the students waitlisted in the lottery. If FPSCS is not at or above capacity by the lottery deadline, the space will be filled on a first come, first serve basis. Waiting List, Withdraws, Re-Enrollment. If a lottery takes place, students not accepted through the lottery will be placed on the waitlist in the order their application was selected during the lottery drawing. Students on the waitlist will have the opportunity to attend FPSCS up until March 1st if a student enrolled transitions out of FPSCS during the school year. Waitlists will not carry over to the next school year. The waitlist will be dissolved on March 1st of the academic year for which a child has sought enrollment. After the March 1st deadline, no new students will be accepted. Families with students on the waitlist will be encouraged to fill out an application during the open application timeframe for enrollment for the following school year. A family may decide to withdraw their student from FPSCS at any time. Families wishing to withdraw their student from FPSCS must sign a letter stating they would like withdraw. If a student is absent for more than two weeks, without being able to contact the family, FPSCS will automatically withdraw a student from FPSCS. Once a student has withdrawn, the student first on the waitlist will be contacted to attend FPSCS. If the parent of the student first on the waitlist decides there is no longer an interest, FPSCS will move to the next student on the waitlist until the space is filled. If a parent decides to pass on a lottery or waitlist opening, FPSCS will remove their application from consideration. If the family becomes interested in having their student attend FPSCS, the family must submit another application as if the child were a new applicant. 30 RCW 28A.710.020(1) Lottery – If capacity is insufficient to enroll all students who apply to FPSCS, then FPSCS will select students through a lottery to ensure fairness. As required by Washington state law, FPSCS will give an enrollment preference to siblings of already enrolled students. Lottery - If there are more applications than seats available in a grade level, then the school will have a lottery. Per Washington law, the lottery will have the following preferences: 1) Siblings of scholars currently enrolled at FPSCS 2) If a student is chosen in the lottery and there is a sibling or siblings on the waitlist for that grade or another grade, they will immediately move into the sibling lottery and will be given preference so the family may all attend the same school, assuming space is available in that sibling’s grade level.

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