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HEA keynote july2014

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Keynote address at the Higher Education Academy conference, Birmingham, UK 3rd July 2014

Published in: Education, Technology

HEA keynote july2014

  1. 1. Higher Education Learning in 2020: a case study Professor Shirley Alexander Deputy Vice-Chancellor University of Technology, Sydney @SAlexander_UTS
  2. 2. Learning futures Transdisciplinary Personalised learning Industry and problem focused Learning2020 Staffing models • Role of academics • Paraprofessionals? • Pay scales Timetable systems Credit recognition Learning2014 Collaborative, active engagement Best of online + face-to-face Authentic Graduate attributes Personal Professional Intellectual UTS Model of Learning Professional Practice Global workplace Research inspired The future of learning at UTS: a roadmap
  3. 3. Learning2014 video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rL0eFmac7mA
  4. 4. Some approaches to leading change Lasorda’s Law Technocracy vs Dynamism
  5. 5. Technocracy • the “one best way” • bring the experts together, establish standards, impose a single set of values • technocrats celebrate their own knowledge and hoard their expertise • vision is a combination of excitement and fear – with the reassurance that some authority will make everything alright Postrel, V. (1998) The Future and its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress, Free Press: New York.
  6. 6. Dynamists • Planning not needed – solution emerges from the interaction of all the individuals • Draw on biological metaphors, variety, experiment, feedback and adaptation • Central value is learning – an open-ended process • Emphasise progress can happen with free experimentation and learning • Have room for a wide range of enterprises • Believe that we learn from choice, competition and criticism • View eccentricity and criticism as part of trial and error learning • Let many different ideas compete and co-exist • Have strong opinions about the best way to do things but realise they may be wrong • Accept that what is best for one may not be for another Postrel, V. (1998) The Future and its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress, Free Press: New York.
  7. 7. “We look for feedback loops rather than a central planning and directing body” Self-organising systems get down to the fundamental principles and continually self- organise around those. Need a vision, turn into goals into broad, simple, well-understood principles that allow people to make decisions without micro-management. Postrel, V. (1998) The Future and its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress, Free Press: New York.
  8. 8. “Strategic leadership naturally does not consist of a set of right answers about ‘how to do it’. Diverse techniques apply to different situations and people.” Core principles: 1. Shape the strategic vision 2. Inspire and enable excellence 3. Devolve leadership of learning and teaching 4. Reward, recognise and develop teaching 5. Involve students http://www.olt.gov.au/executive-leadership-learning-teaching-higher-education-2012
  9. 9. 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
  10. 10. Learning spaces: importance to students (2007) 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 5.00 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87
  11. 11. Learning spaces: student perception of performance (2007) 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 5.00 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88
  12. 12. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 3.5 3.5 Performance Importance (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other learning areas (4.5, 3.4) There are adequate spaces on campus for me to work with other students on group assignments (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus Low Low High High 2007
  13. 13. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies? Which technologies support aims?
  14. 14. LEARNING 2014 What students want • Engaging, interactive F2F classes + podcasts of them • More F2F time with academics • More feedback (+faster turnaround) • Faster turnaround on email and Blackboard questions
  15. 15. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies? Which technologies support aims?
  16. 16. The UTS model of learning 1. An integrated exposure to professional practice through dynamic and multifaceted modes of practice-oriented education 2. Professional practice situated in a global workplace, with international mobility and international and cultural engagement as centre piece 3. Learning which is research- inspired and integrated, providing academic rigour with cutting edge technology to equip graduates for life-long learning
  17. 17. UTS MODEL OF LEARNING integrated exposure to professional practice •Work-based learning •Work integrated learning •Internships •Practicum etc •Volunteer activity, Shopfront projects etc •Field trips - real and virtual •Simulation and role plays - in class or online •Problem-based or issues-based approaches •Multi-media case studies - including student produced work •Guest lectures or podcasts by professionals
  18. 18. UTS MODEL OF LEARNING Graduate attributes related to the UTS Model of Learning • Professional, intellectual and personal graduate attributes eg • Ways of generating, critiquing and working with disciplinary and professional knowledge and practice • Understanding what it means to be a particular kind of professional • Employability skills and longer-term learning attributes • International and intercultural perspectives that enable students to live and work in global contexts • Collaboration, communication and technological capabilities • Capacity to self assess and communicate attributes and engage in lifelong learning and development
  19. 19. 2008 student photo diaries
  20. 20. Student Feedback: Informal space that does not work well • The area outside the computer labs at building 5. Reasons: - Too noisy (during the day) - Bad lighting.. Really bad lighting - Not suitable for serious study or undisturbed discussions (during peak hours) - However it is a good quite place to study alone for the night.
  21. 21. 8/18/10
  22. 22. 8/18/10
  23. 23. Bad Building 2 level 4 Atrium • This whole building creates a very dark feel to it, due to the lack of lighting and use of dull colours • Also the space in the middle as shown isn't utilised properly, engineering students don’t have many places to study . Some tables and couches could be placed there to utilise the open space
  24. 24. C
  25. 25. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 3.5 3.5 Performance Importance (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other learning areas (4.5, 3.4) There are adequate spaces on campus for me to work with other students on group assignments (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus Low Low High High 2007 2012 (4.28, 4.0) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other learning areas (4.1, 3.7) There are adequate spaces on campus for me to work with other students on group assignments (4.1, 4.1) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus (3.9, 3.8) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus
  26. 26. DR CHAU CHAK WING BUILDING EAST ELEVATION
  27. 27. FACULTY OF SCIENCE & GRADUATE SCHOOL OF HEALTH BUILDING
  28. 28. LEARNING 2014 Learning2014
  29. 29. Curriculum design Earlier ways Learning2014 Learning at UTS Practice-oriented learning UTS Model of Learning,: practice-oriented, global and research-inspired What is important What students know What students can do with what they know Subject design Dot point list of content Linking ‘what students can do with what they know’ to objectives -> learning activities and assessment Graduate attributes Largely not identified or included Faculty or course-specific attributes identified, embedded and assessed
  30. 30. What students experienceEarlier ways Learning2014 Learning Primarily lectures, with tutorials, labs or studios, with UTSOnline Best of online learning combined with best of face-to-face collaborative learning with UTSOnline engagement Learning resources Notes from class, readings from Library and textbooks Podcasts, screencasts, Youtube, Open Education Resources, online learning resources, readings and digital resources from Library, social media and textbooks on campus learning experience primarily lectures and tutorials, structured labs, individual studios Primarily collaborative learning activities Some lectures/ guest presentations, inquiry- based and research labs and studios Off-campus learning experience Assignments, studying for exams with UTSOnline engagement Preparing for on-campus learning activities –watching screencasts, pre- reading and online with UTSOnline engagement Assessment Exams – Focus on “What can you remember?”, Assignments. Authentic activities designed to elicit “What can you do with what you have learned?”
  31. 31. Progress to date Graduate Attributes Project – final year of 3 Learning2014 bottom-up strategy • Creating the conditions in which academics can make Learning2014 their own: • Website – case studies, guidesto … etc • Learning2014 Series • Future T&L Fellows • VC’s T&L grants • Presentations, communication at every possible opportunity • Recognition and reward
  32. 32. Communications … Senior Managers forum run in flipped mode Learning2014 email newsletter Website with videos • Presentations at: • every Faculty Board (every year) • Annual Teaching and Learning conference • Sessional staff conference • Senior Management Group • University Council
  33. 33. 0 50 100 150 200 Introduction Strategic Plan Inspiring student success MOOC update Learning2014 Where to from here 8am 7pm 2pm
  34. 34. Groups 1 MOOC debate (3 groups) 2 Elevator Pitch (2 groups) 3 Critique 4 Create a poster
  35. 35. Case Studies of Learning2014 implementation
  36. 36. Anthony Kadi Head, Engineering Practice Program
  37. 37. 49202 COMMUNICATION PROTOCOLS  Postgraduate Telecommunications Subject  Have taught for ~10 years  3 main periods:  2004 – 2011 – Standard Mode – 14 weeks, 3 hours per week  2011 – 2013 – Block Mode – 7 weeks, 3 x 2 day blocks, 9am-5pm + exam  August 2013 – Flipped block mode – no lectures!  I will be showing you:  Comparison of face to face hours in each of the above periods  Comparison of student results in each semester  Comparison of SFS results across the 3 different periods  Extracts from video lectures (3 different styles)
  38. 38. FACE TO FACE HOURS 16 14 0 8 7 10 15 11 14 3 4 4 3 3 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 2004-2011 2012-2013 Aug2013 Face-to-FaceHours Lecture Tutorial Lab Quizzes Final Exam 11% 31%
  39. 39. VIDEO LECTURES  34 videos  Average length: 15:37  Minimum: 2:14  Maximum: 37:40  TOTAL: 8:50  Avg file size: 15.88Mb  Total: 540Mb  Prep. Time: ~55 hours  Payback after about 4 semesters  Less for next subject 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 0:05:00 0:10:00 0:15:00 0:20:00 0:25:00 0:30:00 0:35:00 0:40:00 Frequency Video Length Video length histogram Frequency 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Lecture Hours (standard mode) Video Total Preparation time
  40. 40. TECHNOLOGY  Laptop  Camtasia Studio ($185)  Desktop document camera ($99)  External USB Microphone (~$20)
  41. 41. STUDENT RESULTS 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Average Final Subject Mark +/- 1 St. Dev. Avg long-term average block mode; new materials; online final exam Threshold exam (3 attempts) Flipped
  42. 42. SFS results 3.5 3.75 4 4.25 4.5 4.75 5 5.25 5.5 SFS Scores +/- 1 Std. Dev. Aut2008 Aut2009 Aut2010 Aut2011 Aug2012 Mar2013 Aug2013 Flipped
  43. 43. Project blog: http://testingflippedlearning2013.wordpress.com/
  44. 44. Melissa Edwards Future T&L fellow Flipped learning in large classes Flipped learning and cross-disciplinary learning: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnEo6KquosM
  45. 45. Other case studies of Learning2014 http://www.uts.edu.au/research-and-teaching/teaching-and- learning/learning2014/new-approaches/case-studies
  46. 46. pic.twitter.com/eeH9Ip1S
  47. 47. Things take longer to happen than you think they will and then … they happen faster than you think they could. Larry Summers Former President, Harvard
  48. 48. LEARNING 2014 Learning2014 rollout – harder and faster!
  49. 49. Is this approach likely to achieve large-scale change needed?
  50. 50. Team approach • Faculty-based academic as team leader • IML academic as facilitator of, or advisor on, course/ curriculum design • Educational technology support • Academic and languages literacy support • Library support In addition, as required, the team will include staff members from AVS, ITD and Careers.
  51. 51. For implementation this year: 1. Development of University KPI on Learning2014 compliance 2. Development of Faculty Learning2014 compact 3. Peer Review system for determining Learning2014 compliance
  52. 52. LEARNING 2014 Aligning systems and infrastructure
  53. 53. Learning2020 projects • a more nuanced timetabling system • change in workload models • salary scales • appellation - ‘Lecturer’ ‘Senior Lecturer’? • student expectations and ‘buy-in’ • credit recognition •SFS review
  54. 54. UTS: A data intensive university
  55. 55. UTS: a data intensive university Learning UTS: a data intensive university 1. Solve problems • attrition • preparation • ‘killer’ subjects 2. Promote student engagement 3. Personalised learning 4. Allocate resources
  56. 56. i-Educator- introductionHi – I’m calling from Student Services. We’re calling all first years just to see how you’re going First year student list (7000+) UTS students Student Systems Outreach program Outreach workflow
  57. 57. Decision tree model for attrition after two years of engineering degree study for the 2003 Domestic entry cohort at Institution D Source: http://www.altc.edu.au/resource-engineering-qualification-curriculum-uts-2011
  58. 58. UTS: a data intensive university Student dashboard
  59. 59. Centre for Connected Intelligence
  60. 60. Paul Ramsden “Leadership is a balancing act. We might wish it were systematic and predictable; in reality, it is disordered and episodic; and each leader’s history is scattered with omissions, confusion and failures” Source: Learning to Lead in Higher Education, p254.
  61. 61. Learning2014: for students What will your learning experience be like at UTS http://t.co/TUJanwqcBq
  62. 62. http://www.uts.edu.au/research -and-teaching/teaching-and- learning/learning2014/overview Some links Learning2014 website
  63. 63. Learning2014 team Dr Tanja Golja Susan Sherringham Marilyn Harris From IML Ass Prof Jo McKenzie Dr Peter Kandlbinder Jenny Pizzica And many others ITD team led by Dr Chrissie Burns UTS Library staff led by Mal Booth FMU and PMO staff: Glen Rabbitt and Nigel Oliver And our 37,000 students!

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