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2013 ACODE Learning Technologies Leadership Institute presentation

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This is a presentation given to the 2013 ACODE Learning Technologies Leadership Institute

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2013 ACODE Learning Technologies Leadership Institute presentation

  1. 1. Leading and managing change in using learning technologies Professor Shirley Alexander Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Teaching, Learning and Equity) University of Technology, Sydney @SAlexander_UTS
  2. 2. Some approaches… Leading change • Looking in • Looking out • Looking back • Looking forward Managing change • Technocracy vs • Dynamism • Lasorda’s Law
  3. 3. Technocracy • the “one best way” • bring the experts together, establish standards, impose a single set of values • technocrats celebrate their own knowledge and hoard their expertise • vision is a combination of excitement and fear – with the reassurance that some authority will make everything alright • maintenance of belief that society can be effectively managed through effective leadership and expertise • require beaurocracies to organise and run them. • also often have the power to veto member’s ideas Postrel, V. (1998) The Future and its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress, Free Press: New York.
  4. 4. Dynamists: • Planning not needed – solution emerges from the interaction of all the individuals • Draw on biological metaphors, variety, experiment, feedback and adaptation • Central value is learning – an open-ended process • Emphasise progress can happen with free experimentation and learning • Have room for a wide range of enterprises • Believe that we learn from choice, competition and criticism • View eccentricity and criticism as part of trial and error learning • Let many different ideas compete and co-exist • Have strong opinions about the best way to do things but realise they may be wrong • Accept that what is best for one may not be for another • Moral vision emphasises individual flourishing • Happiness is freedom to learn, to stretch ourselves, to try new things Postrel, V. (1998) The Future and its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress, Free Press: New York.
  5. 5. • “We look for feedback loops rather than a central planning and directing body” (eg ants follow scent emitted by ants who have found food, birds fly in v formation with no particular leader) • Self-organising systems get down to the fundamental principles and continually self- organise around those. • Need a vision, turn into goals into broad, simple, well-understood principles that allow people to make decisions without micro-management. Postrel, V. (1998) The Future and its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress, Free Press: New York.
  6. 6. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies? Which technologies support aims?
  7. 7. What students want •Engaging, interactive F2F classes + podcasts of them •More F2F time with academics •More feedback (+faster turnaround) •When casual academics are employed, they should be paid more (to attend all classes etc) •Faster turnaround on email and UTSOnline (Bb) questions •Bring back office hours
  8. 8. Classroom audits Weekly comparison shows that attendance decreases slightly each week over the course of the semester (approx average of 3% per week) Credit: DEGW
  9. 9. Learning spaces: importance to students (2007) 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 5.00 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87
  10. 10. Learning spaces: student perception of performance (2007) 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 5.00 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88
  11. 11. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 3.5 3.5 Performance Importance (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other learning areas (4.5, 3.4) There are adequate spaces on campus for me to work with other students on group assignments (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus Low Low High High 2007
  12. 12. 2008 student photo diaries
  13. 13. Student Feedback: Informal space that does not work well • The area outside the computer labs at building 5. Reasons: - Too noisy (during the day) - Bad lighting.. Really bad lighting - Not suitable for serious study or undisturbed discussions (during peak hours) - However it is a good quite place to study alone for the night.
  14. 14. Bad Building 2 level 4 Atrium • This whole building creates a very dark feel to it, due to the lack of lighting and use of dull colours • Also the space in the middle as shown isn't utilised properly, engineering students don’t have many places to study . Some tables and couches could be placed there to utilise the open space
  15. 15. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies?s paces Which technologies support aims?
  16. 16. The UTS model of learning 1. An integrated exposure to professional practice through dynamic and multifaceted modes of practice-oriented education 2. Professional practice situated in a global workplace, with international mobility and international and cultural engagement as centre piece 3. Learning which is research- inspired and integrated, providing academic rigour with cutting edge technology to equip graduates for life-long learning
  17. 17. Integrated exposure to professional practice • Work-based learning • Work integrated learning – Internships – Practicum etc • Volunteer activity, Shopfront projects etc • Field trips - real and virtual • Simulation and role plays - in class or online • Problem-based or issues- based approaches • Multi-media case studies - including student produced work • Guest lectures or podcasts by professionals at work site at uni
  18. 18. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies? Which technologies support aims?
  19. 19. http://www.review-edu.com/
  20. 20. http://spark.uts.edu.au/
  21. 21. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies? Which technologies support aims?
  22. 22. Creating a Sticky Campus
  23. 23. Example outcomes
  24. 24. 8/18/10
  25. 25. 8/18/10
  26. 26. C
  27. 27. Credit: Anna Zhu
  28. 28. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 3.5 3.5 Performance Importance (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other learning areas (4.5, 3.4) There are adequate spaces on campus for me to work with other students on group assignments (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus Low Low High High 2007 2012 (4.28, 4.0) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other learning areas (4.1, 3.7) There are adequate spaces on campus for me to work with other students on group assignments (4.1, 4.1) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus (3.9, 3.8) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus
  29. 29. DR CHAU CHAK WING BUILDING EAST ELEVATION
  30. 30. pic.twitter.com/eeH9Ip1S
  31. 31. ⬆costof higher education ⬇Govt funding ? Is the investment worth it disaggregation
  32. 32. Things take longer to happen than you think they will and then … they happen faster than you think they could. Larry Summers Former President, Harvard
  33. 33. LEARNING 2014 Learning2014 supporting innovation in the design of learning
  34. 34. making sense testing action receiving feedback reflect questions accessing ideas content learning goals
  35. 35. LEARNING 2014 flipped learning
  36. 36. LEARNING 2014 remote laboratories
  37. 37. LEARNING 2014 simulations
  38. 38. $
  39. 39. access to information and resources Learning2014 website case studies videos downloadable resources Learning2014 seminar series Future Learning Fellows
  40. 40. test out new approaches Learning2014 grants Communities of Practice flipped learning OER inquiry-based learning Future Learning Fellows
  41. 41. Receive feedback Social media Student feedback Peer review
  42. 42. reflect blogs
  43. 43. Learning2020
  44. 44. Learning2020 projects • a more nuanced timetabling system • change in workload models • salary scales • appellation - ‘Lecturer’ ‘Senior Lecturer’? • student expectations • credit recognition
  45. 45. Complementary projects • Systematic embedding of graduate attributes • Data analytics • Assessment review
  46. 46. http://www.uts.edu.au/research-and- teaching/teaching-and- learning/learning2014/overview

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