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Raising Successful
Children in the 21st
Century
Dr. Shen-Li Lee
Who am I?
How Would You Define a
Successful Child?
○ Intelligent
○ Creative
○ Resourceful
○ Straight A’s
○ Sociable
○ All-rounder
○ ...
Failure
Adversity builds strength of character
Link: The Growth Mindset in Education
Social Skills
Let’s Talk:
How do you help your
child develop social skills?
Social Skills Development
○ Neuro-dramatic Play - Sue Jennings
○ Mindfulness Meditation
○ Sports
○ Music
○ Play - especial...
Dysrationalia
○ Not being able to think rationally despite
being intelligent.
○ Affects even people with high IQ scores.
○...
“With many students, it’s not like
they can’t remember the material.
It’s like they’ve never seen it
before.” Henry L. Roe...
Let’s Talk:
How do we help children
learn better?
Enhancing Learning and
Performance
○ Power posing
○ Spaced learning
○ Interleaving
○ Handwritten notes
○ Gamefication
○ Cr...
What is more important?
High IQ
or
High Creativity?
Write down as many uses as you
can think of for:
A Brick
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A Blanket
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Answer from a prodigy with one
of the highest IQs in his school:
Brick
1. Building things
2. Throwing
Blanket
1. Keeping w...
Answer from a top student:
Brick
1. To use in smash-and-grab
raids
2. To help hold a house togetehr
3. To use in a game of...
Creativity Trumps IQ
Testing academic performance on individuals with:
○ High IQ High creativity
○ High IQ Low creativity
...
Getting Creative
○ Sleep - dreams
○ Down time - day dreaming
○ Nature - increases creativity by 50%
○ Play
○ Socialising -...
To Sum it up
1. Social Skills
2. Failure
3. Dysrationalia - Thinking strategies
4. Learning Practices
5. Creativity
Raising Successful Children in the 21st Century
Raising Successful Children in the 21st Century
Raising Successful Children in the 21st Century
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Raising Successful Children in the 21st Century

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Our children may be one of the top students in their school but once they get to university and beyond, they will meet other brilliant individuals who are just as smart or even more so. What differentiates them and helps them stand out from the crowd will be the additional skills and experiences they have developed along the way – such as creativity, social skills, the ability to think critically, how well they handle failure, their life-long learning skills, and more. When we think of their education and how to prepare them for life in the 21st Century, we should also be asking ourselves what are we doing to ensure they develop these additional skills.

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Raising Successful Children in the 21st Century

  1. 1. Raising Successful Children in the 21st Century Dr. Shen-Li Lee
  2. 2. Who am I?
  3. 3. How Would You Define a Successful Child? ○ Intelligent ○ Creative ○ Resourceful ○ Straight A’s ○ Sociable ○ All-rounder ○ Diligent ○ Responsible ○ Resilient ○ ...
  4. 4. Failure Adversity builds strength of character Link: The Growth Mindset in Education
  5. 5. Social Skills
  6. 6. Let’s Talk: How do you help your child develop social skills?
  7. 7. Social Skills Development ○ Neuro-dramatic Play - Sue Jennings ○ Mindfulness Meditation ○ Sports ○ Music ○ Play - especially mixed ages ○ Reading Fiction
  8. 8. Dysrationalia ○ Not being able to think rationally despite being intelligent. ○ Affects even people with high IQ scores. ○ Result of: poor thinking strategies, lazy thinking, personal biases. ○ Teach children “how” to think not “what” to think ○ de Bono Thinking Hats ○ Critical thinking - RED (recognise assumptions, evaluate arguments, draw conclusions) Link: Why children need to be taught thinking skills
  9. 9. “With many students, it’s not like they can’t remember the material. It’s like they’ve never seen it before.” Henry L. Roediger III, a psychologist at Washington University in St. Louis in reference to students moving on to a more advanced class. Making Learning Count
  10. 10. Let’s Talk: How do we help children learn better?
  11. 11. Enhancing Learning and Performance ○ Power posing ○ Spaced learning ○ Interleaving ○ Handwritten notes ○ Gamefication ○ Critical Thinking Skills ○ Sleep ○ Nutrition ○ Brain breaks ○ Avoid multi-tasking
  12. 12. What is more important? High IQ or High Creativity?
  13. 13. Write down as many uses as you can think of for: A Brick 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A Blanket 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  14. 14. Answer from a prodigy with one of the highest IQs in his school: Brick 1. Building things 2. Throwing Blanket 1. Keeping warm 2. Smothering fire 3. Tying to trees and sleeping in (as a hammock) 4. Improvised stretcher
  15. 15. Answer from a top student: Brick 1. To use in smash-and-grab raids 2. To help hold a house togetehr 3. To use in a game of russian roulette if you want to keep fit at the same time (bricks at ten paces, turn and throw – no evasive action allowed) 4. To hold the eiderdown on a bed tie a brick at each corner 5. As a breaker of empty Coca- cola bottles Blanket 1. To use on a bed 2. As a cover for illicit sex in the woods 3. As a tent 4. To make smoke signals with 5. As a sail for a boat, cart or sled 6. As a substitute for a towel 7. As a target for shooting practice for short-sighted people 8. As a thing to catch people jumping out of burning skyscrapers
  16. 16. Creativity Trumps IQ Testing academic performance on individuals with: ○ High IQ High creativity ○ High IQ Low creativity ○ Low IQ High creativity ○ Low IQ Low creativity
  17. 17. Getting Creative ○ Sleep - dreams ○ Down time - day dreaming ○ Nature - increases creativity by 50% ○ Play ○ Socialising - “creativity does not exist in a vacuum” Creativity is not an “aha” moment - it is a process. “You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.” - Jack London
  18. 18. To Sum it up 1. Social Skills 2. Failure 3. Dysrationalia - Thinking strategies 4. Learning Practices 5. Creativity

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