Copyright
and the
Internet
Are you breaking the law?!?!?!
Copyright 2012. Copyright Instructional Design Team. All Rights ...
Let's test your knowledge....
Pull out your smart device!
We are going to do a quick Easypoll.
(Link to EasyPoll).
(Questi...
What is Copyright?
•  Laws have been created to protect authors
and artists that create things that are
creative and “orig...
Did You Know....
Copyright and Technology Timeline
1439 - moveable
type printing press
invented
1557- England's
Queen Mary...
Did You Know....
1876-1899 Telephone,
Phonograph, Motion PIcture
Camera, Hand Camera,
Magnetic Tape Recorder
Invented
1909...
Did You Know....
1962 Cassette
Tape invented
1967 Computer
floppy disk
invented
1979 Sony
Walkman
introduced
1981 IBM
intr...
Did You Know....
1983 Internet
developed
1984 Mac personal
computer released and
Discman developed
1995 DVD
developed
2001...
What is covered under copyright?
•  Tangible medium (tangible does not necessarily mean
published)
o  literary works
o  mu...
What is not covered under
copyright?
•  Non-tangible items - If you have a great
idea, but have not written it down, it is...
Public Domain
•  Works available for anyone to use.
•  Works created before 1923
•  Most works created between 1923-1978 (...
How long does the copyright last?
1. Created after 1978
a.  automatically protected from moment of creation
b.  lasts term...
Copyright and the 21st Century
•  Copyright laws generally predate our current
technologies.
o  Remember the timeline?!?!
...
Internets Do's and Dont's
•  DON'T
o  Download graphics, bullets, logos, fonts,
photographs, and illustrations.
o  Copy an...
Quick note about software
•  Software is all the programs that run on your physical
computer (hardware)
•  Commercial soft...
The Digital Millennium Copyright
Act
•  1998 amendment to the original 1976 law to
match the laws with the technology
avai...
DMCA Part 1
•  The "Treaties" section
•  Extends US copyright law to cover countries
that signed the WIPO treaty as part o...
DMCA Part 2
•  Online Copyright Infringement
•  Protects internet service providers and
hosting sites (AT&T, YouTube, etc)...
DMCA Parts 3-5
•  Part 3: Temporary copies of copyrighted
material can be made for purposes of repair
•  Part 4: Internet ...
TEACH Act
•  2002 law that governs the way copyrighted
material can be used in distance education
•  Educators are only pr...
TEACH Act: What can teachers do?
•  Display nearly all types of works
•  Now there is no restriction on a recipient’s
loca...
TEACH Act: What must teachers do?
•  Supervise the display or performance of
copyrighted materials
•  Ensure that material...
TEACH Act: What must institutions
do?
•  Institute policies regarding copyright
•  Provide information materials about cop...
Fair Use
Educators and students get a break with the
"Fair Use" clause in copyright law.
What is "Fair Use"
Fair Use is part of the copyright law. It allows
people to use and make copies of
copyrighted works wit...
How do I know if it is "Fair Use?"
Ask yourself these 4 questions:
1. What is the PURPOSE?
2. What is the NATURE?
3. What ...
Fair Use: Purpose
•  Acceptable
o  Teaching, Research, News Reporting
•  Illegal
o  Making money from the sale of the work...
Fair Use: Nature
•  Acceptable
o  Mostly factual
o  Important to education
•  Illegal
o  Creative works such as art, music...
Fair Use: Effect
•  Acceptable
o  No major effect
o  User owns a legal copy of work
•  Illegal
o  Could replace selling of...
Fair Use: Amount
•  Acceptable
o  Small bit
o  Portion not critical to entire work
•  Illegal
o  Large parts or entire wor...
Fair Use: What can we use?
•  Though not expressly written as law,
legislative action over time in relation to the
Copyrig...
What can we use? Literary Works
Books 10% or 1 chapter
Poetry 250 words; not more than 3 works
by same author
Children's B...
What can we use? Images
Images from a book A single chart, graph, diagram,
drawing, cartoon, or picture
Photos and
Illustr...
What can we use? Music
Sheet Music •  backup copies for performances
•  10% of a whole or 100% of a part (Aria
from an ope...
What can we use? Videos
Video must be used for educational, NOT
entertainment purposes
Live
Broadcasts
•  Retained for 45 ...
What can we use? Software
Personally
Purchased
Install on a single classroom computer
(in addition to your home computer) ...
Educational Multimedia
Presentations
•  All multimedia presentations by teachers and students MUST
contain:
1.  Citation o...
Multimedia Presentations: Teacher
Teachers can use the products for:
•  face-to-face instruction
•  student self-study
•  ...
Multimedia Presentations: Student
Students can use the products for:
•  educational uses in the course for which they
were...
Fair Use No-No's!
Fair Use does NOT allow you to:
•  make copies as a substitution for purchasing a work
•  copy the same ...
Citing Your Sources
•  In most cases, you do not have to follow
formal APA or MLA citation standards when
citing material ...
What information do you include?
•  ALWAYS credit the author either
o  Directly next to the work used
o  On a works cited ...
Locating Information
•  Public Domain - Go here for a list of
materials currently in the public domain:
http://www.pdinfo....
So.... what does this all mean?
Well, basically, if you don't follow these laws and
guidelines, you can be in A LOT of tro...
Additional References
•  “Fair Use Guidelines For Educational Multimedia” Prepared by the
Educational Multimedia Fair Use ...
Additional References continued
•  “10 Big Myths about Copyright Explained” by Brad Templeton http://
www.templetons.com/b...
Credits
•  Copyright Information obtained from the following sources:
o  Creany, Norman.. (n.d.). Digital Millennium Copyr...
Copyright
and the
Internet
Are you breaking the law?!?!?!
Copyright 2012. Copyright Instructional Design Team. All Rights ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Idd presentation view only

734 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
734
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Idd presentation view only

  1. 1. Copyright and the Internet Are you breaking the law?!?!?! Copyright 2012. Copyright Instructional Design Team. All Rights Reserved.
  2. 2. Let's test your knowledge.... Pull out your smart device! We are going to do a quick Easypoll. (Link to EasyPoll). (Questions for EasyPoll can be found in Appendix A in design document).
  3. 3. What is Copyright? •  Laws have been created to protect authors and artists that create things that are creative and “original.” •  If someone produces something that is original – no one else has created anything quite like it – then that person is the only one who can copy it, perform it in public, or publish it, unless he/she gives that permission to someone else.
  4. 4. Did You Know.... Copyright and Technology Timeline 1439 - moveable type printing press invented 1557- England's Queen Mary grants the Stationer's Company a monopoly on printing 1710 England's First Copyright Laws 1787 First US Copyright law 1790 Second US Copyright law
  5. 5. Did You Know.... 1876-1899 Telephone, Phonograph, Motion PIcture Camera, Hand Camera, Magnetic Tape Recorder Invented 1909 US Copyright law revised - 28 year term 1923 TV invented 1941 First US TV Broadcast 1951 Video tape recorder invented/First Commercial Computer (Univac) 1936 First Computer (Z1) appears 1953 Recording and performing rights added to Copyright
  6. 6. Did You Know.... 1962 Cassette Tape invented 1967 Computer floppy disk invented 1979 Sony Walkman introduced 1981 IBM introduces PC 1976 Copyright Act revises time and adds Fair Use 1969 ARPANET (precursor to the Internet) is created 1972 VCR developed, first home video game 1973 Cell Phone Invented 1982 CDs go into production
  7. 7. Did You Know.... 1983 Internet developed 1984 Mac personal computer released and Discman developed 1995 DVD developed 2001 iPod launched 1992 Digital Home Recording Act 1990 First web browser developed 2007 Kindle launched; iPhone launched 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension; Digital Millennium Act 2002 TEACH Act 2005 Family Entertainment and Copyright Act 2010 iPad launched
  8. 8. What is covered under copyright? •  Tangible medium (tangible does not necessarily mean published) o  literary works o  musical works (including lyrics) o  dramatic works (including any music along with) o  choreography o  pictures and sculpture o  sound recordings o  architectural works o  video •  Content on the web is considered tangible!
  9. 9. What is not covered under copyright? •  Non-tangible items - If you have a great idea, but have not written it down, it is not copyrighted! •  Procedures and methods •  Data (i.e. telephone books) •  Things without original authorship (calendars, height charts, etc.) •  U.S. Government material •  Anything in the Public Domain
  10. 10. Public Domain •  Works available for anyone to use. •  Works created before 1923 •  Most works created between 1923-1978 (if copyright was not recorded or renewed) •  Works authored by employees of the federal government. •  Works that the copyright owner has freely granted to the public domain.
  11. 11. How long does the copyright last? 1. Created after 1978 a.  automatically protected from moment of creation b.  lasts term of author's life plus 70 years 2. Created before 1978 a.  lasts for a term of 28 years from date it was secured b.  Can renew for additional 67 years 3. Anonymous works a.  95 years from publication or 120 years from creation (whichever is shorter)
  12. 12. Copyright and the 21st Century •  Copyright laws generally predate our current technologies. o  Remember the timeline?!?! •  The Internet is NOT public domain.
  13. 13. Internets Do's and Dont's •  DON'T o  Download graphics, bullets, logos, fonts, photographs, and illustrations. o  Copy and paste information from another site, especially if you reformat the information to make it appear your own. o  Copy another site's html code •  DO o  Get permission to use online work from the owner of that work. o  Remember that print rights and electronic rights for use and distribution are not the same
  14. 14. Quick note about software •  Software is all the programs that run on your physical computer (hardware) •  Commercial software is covered by copyright o  One backup copy allowed. o  cannot modify the software •  Freeware software o  covered by copyright o  copies can be made for distribution, but cannot distribute for profit o  modifying software is allowed, but cannot distribute for profit
  15. 15. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act •  1998 amendment to the original 1976 law to match the laws with the technology available. It was divided into 5 sections •  Referred to as DMCA
  16. 16. DMCA Part 1 •  The "Treaties" section •  Extends US copyright law to cover countries that signed the WIPO treaty as part of writing the DMCA •  Now illegal to circumvent technical measures to prevent copyright infringement (both accessing and copying) o  This is where DRM issues are present
  17. 17. DMCA Part 2 •  Online Copyright Infringement •  Protects internet service providers and hosting sites (AT&T, YouTube, etc) from being prosecuted if they have made reasonable efforts to remove copyrighted material.
  18. 18. DMCA Parts 3-5 •  Part 3: Temporary copies of copyrighted material can be made for purposes of repair •  Part 4: Internet radio channels and other streaming audio must pay royalties to copyright holders. •  Part 5: Boat vessel hull designs are now protected by copyright.
  19. 19. TEACH Act •  2002 law that governs the way copyrighted material can be used in distance education •  Educators are only protected by the TEACH act if they work for an accredited institution •  Only modifies a few parts of copyright law; the fair use clause is still in effect.
  20. 20. TEACH Act: What can teachers do? •  Display nearly all types of works •  Now there is no restriction on a recipient’s location •  Retention and student access for the length of the class session •  Allows the copying and storage of materials when necessary for digital transmission to students •  Allows print works to be digitized if used for a limited time and not available by other
  21. 21. TEACH Act: What must teachers do? •  Supervise the display or performance of copyrighted materials •  Ensure that materials used are an integral part of "mediated instructional activities" •  Ensure that materials used are not "typically purchased or acquired by the students" (i.e. textbooks)
  22. 22. TEACH Act: What must institutions do? •  Institute policies regarding copyright •  Provide information materials about copyright to students, faculty, and staff •  Provide notice to students when materials may be subject to copyright protection •  Limit the transmission of educational content to enrolled students •  Prevent the storage of materials where that they are accessible to anyone besides enrolled students •  Prevent the retention of materials by students for periods longer than the "class session" •  Prevent the dissemination of materials
  23. 23. Fair Use Educators and students get a break with the "Fair Use" clause in copyright law.
  24. 24. What is "Fair Use" Fair Use is part of the copyright law. It allows people to use and make copies of copyrighted works without getting permission if they are using them for: •  criticism •  comment •  news reporting •  teaching •  scholarship •  research
  25. 25. How do I know if it is "Fair Use?" Ask yourself these 4 questions: 1. What is the PURPOSE? 2. What is the NATURE? 3. What is the EFFECT? 4. What is the AMOUNT Basically if the answers aren't educational, mostly factual and important to education, none, and just a little bit you could be in TROUBLE!
  26. 26. Fair Use: Purpose •  Acceptable o  Teaching, Research, News Reporting •  Illegal o  Making money from the sale of the work o  Using without giving credit to the author
  27. 27. Fair Use: Nature •  Acceptable o  Mostly factual o  Important to education •  Illegal o  Creative works such as art, music, fiction
  28. 28. Fair Use: Effect •  Acceptable o  No major effect o  User owns a legal copy of work •  Illegal o  Could replace selling of the original o  Made available of the web
  29. 29. Fair Use: Amount •  Acceptable o  Small bit o  Portion not critical to entire work •  Illegal o  Large parts or entire work used o  Part used is crucial to success SO.......how much exactly CAN I use?
  30. 30. Fair Use: What can we use? •  Though not expressly written as law, legislative action over time in relation to the Copyright laws have provided the following guidelines in relation to the original 1976 copyright law. •  Applies to print and items found on the internet
  31. 31. What can we use? Literary Works Books 10% or 1 chapter Poetry 250 words; not more than 3 works by same author Children's Books 10% or 2 pages Short Article 2500 words or less Excerpt from big work 10% or 1000 words
  32. 32. What can we use? Images Images from a book A single chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon, or picture Photos and Illustrations 5 images from one author Data Sets 10% or 2500 fields/cells Other (News, magazine) Single chart, graph, diagram, drawing, etc.
  33. 33. What can we use? Music Sheet Music •  backup copies for performances •  10% of a whole or 100% of a part (Aria from an opera) •  music may be altered for performance as long as the character of the work is not changed •  Single copies of out of print works Sound Recording Single copies may be made for the purpose of constructing aural practices or examinations Recordings of Students Single copy can be made for evaluation purposes; can be retained by teacher and/or institution
  34. 34. What can we use? Videos Video must be used for educational, NOT entertainment purposes Live Broadcasts •  Retained for 45 days after date of recording. •  Used only once with each class during the first 10 days of retention period •  After 10 days, used for teacher-evaluation purposes only
  35. 35. What can we use? Software Personally Purchased Install on a single classroom computer (in addition to your home computer) for limited personal use or use with students. District/School Purchased Put a copy on your home computer for limited job-related activities.
  36. 36. Educational Multimedia Presentations •  All multimedia presentations by teachers and students MUST contain: 1.  Citation of the copyrighted material 2.  Notice that the material is being used under the fair use exemption of copyright law •  Storage o  Only 2 copies can be made o  Online projects can be used for 15 days after initial use o  Students cannot have copies of instructional presentations
  37. 37. Multimedia Presentations: Teacher Teachers can use the products for: •  face-to-face instruction •  student self-study •  Real-time remote courses, provided the students cannot copy the presentation •  Use for two years, then must re-obtain permission •  Presentations at peer workshops and conferences •  Job interviews and evaluations
  38. 38. Multimedia Presentations: Student Students can use the products for: •  educational uses in the course for which they were created •  portfolios •  job and school interviews
  39. 39. Fair Use No-No's! Fair Use does NOT allow you to: •  make copies as a substitution for purchasing a work •  copy the same works for more than one semester, class, or course •  copy the same work more than nine times in a single semester •  use copyrighted material for commercial purposes •  copy consumable items (workbooks, tests, etc).
  40. 40. Citing Your Sources •  In most cases, you do not have to follow formal APA or MLA citation standards when citing material for educational use. •  If you DO need to use formal citation, visit the following website and plug in your url - it will give you the proper way to cite your material! o  http://citationmachine.net/index2.php
  41. 41. What information do you include? •  ALWAYS credit the author either o  Directly next to the work used o  On a works cited or reference page •  Include: o  Author or Webmaster o  Copyright Date (if available) o  Date Accessed o  Title o  url •  Copyright sign o  © Mac = option g
  42. 42. Locating Information •  Public Domain - Go here for a list of materials currently in the public domain: http://www.pdinfo.com/ •  Creative Commons o  Creative Commons was created to allow people to freely share images, text, and other works while retaining copyright privileges o  Must cite properly! o  http://creativecommons.org/ •  Google Image Search o  Can do a custom image search and set usage to
  43. 43. So.... what does this all mean? Well, basically, if you don't follow these laws and guidelines, you can be in A LOT of trouble! You will be guilty of plagiarism and the penalties are: o  Civil Penalties §  Copyright holder can sue you for damages anywhere from $200 to $150,000, even if "you didn't mean to!" o  Criminal Penalties §  If you break copyright for a profit, the value of the infringement is more than $1,000, or if you distribute work over the Internet (commercial works), you could: •  spend a 1-5 years in jail •  pay fines
  44. 44. Additional References •  “Fair Use Guidelines For Educational Multimedia” Prepared by the Educational Multimedia Fair Use Guidelines Development Committee, July 17, 1996 http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/resources/copyright.html •  “Fair Use Of Copyrighted Materials” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/copypol2.htm •  “Copyright Basics” by the U.S. Copyright Office http://www.loc.gov/ copyright/circs/circ1.pdf •  “The Copyright Website” by Benedict O’Mahoney http://www.benedict.com/ •  “Copyright Law in the Electronic Environment” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/ faculty.htm
  45. 45. Additional References continued •  “10 Big Myths about Copyright Explained” by Brad Templeton http:// www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html •  “Duhaime's Law Dictionary” by Lloyd Duhaime http://www.duhaime.org/ diction.htm •  “When Works Pass Into the Public Domain in the United States” by Cornell Institute for Digital Collections http://cidc.library.cornell.edu/copyright/
  46. 46. Credits •  Copyright Information obtained from the following sources: o  Creany, Norman.. (n.d.). Digital Millennium Copyright Explained. . Retrieved 10 November 2012 from http:// normancreaney.wordpress.com/information-technology-the-law/digital-millennium-copyright-act-explained/ o  http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html. (2012, June). Retrieved 11 November 2012 from http://www.copyright.gov o  Kelly, Warner. (2012, February 15). Retrieved 11 November 2012 from http://www.aaronkellylaw.com/online- intellectual-property/dmca-wiki-summary/ o  Library of congress. (n.d.). Retrieved 9 November 2012 from http://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/ copyright.html Maglof, Lisa. (n.d.). Retrieved 25 November 2012 from http://info.legalzoom.com/happens-break- copyright-laws-20309.html o  Starr, L. (2010, May 25). The educators guide to copyright and fair use . Retrieved 10 November 2012 from http:// www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr280.shtml/ o  Teaching copyright. (2011, October 19). Electric frontier foundation. Retrieved 10 November from from http:// www.teachingcopyright.org/curriculum/hs o  University of Washington (2012). The Teach Act. Retrieved 25 November 2012 from http://depts.washington.edu/uwcopy/Copyright_Law/TEACH_Act/ •  Images obtained from the following sources (unless otherwise noted with the image itself) o  http://openclipart.org/ o  http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/?CTT=97
  47. 47. Copyright and the Internet Are you breaking the law?!?!?! Copyright 2012. Copyright Instructional Design Team. All Rights Reserved.

×