EMOTIONAL TRAUMATIZATION       ORIGINS    CONSEQUENCES      AND CURES
FELITTI, V.J. (2002)The relationship betweenadverse childhood events andadult health: Turning Gold intoLead. The Permanent...
Havening has three components    • Recall and activation of an emotional core    • Distraction / other sensory input    • ...
THE EXTRASENSORY RESPONSE TO                TOUCH  • Touch modulates GABA release via serotonin  • Increase in Delta wave ...
Displacement of thought fromworking memory by distraction     • Humming a tune     • Counting     • Visualizing movement
Extrasensory Responses of Sensory Input Can Change        the brain   • Smell      • Sight   • Touch      • Taste   • Audi...
THE PSYCHOSENSORY THERAPIES• INVOLVE THE APPLICATION OF SENSORY  INPUT TO ALTER BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING• ARE SENSORY RECEPT...
UFS
Awareness  vigilance / salience                       Flight or fight                   /Freeze response               ...
Ancient Emotions and Survival     Reactive Emotions  Fear            Defensive rage     -- most primitive     -- predator ...
Types of Fear• Freeze, Salience   • Panic  and vigilance                     •Flaccidity / thanatosis• Flight or fight
FLIGHT/FIGHT →   PANIC       ↓    THANATOSIS
Panic   Prefrontal        Cortex        taken off line
Fear is stimulated by our senses   • Olfactory      • Kinesthetic   • Auditory       • Visual            • Gustatory
Fear Activates Physiologic Changes         via the Amygdala-- increased heart rate-- pupil dilation-- heightened sensory a...
The Amygdala Activates our Emotions and  Coordinates our Survival Responses
OUTFLOW FROM CENTRAL NUCLEUSEmotional StimulusThalamusLA/BLA/AB AmygdalaCe AmygdalaPhysiological Response             ...
Encoding a Trauma
EVENT• Increases cortisol and norepinephrine, dopamine• Experienced personally or vicariously• Produces intense emotional ...
MEANINGIs about ATTACHMENT      • PHYSICAL      • PERSONAL      • PUBLIC
LANDSCAPEThe neurochemical state ofthe brain at any given time.
INESCAPABILITYA perceived inescapable threateningsituation has the potential to traumatize.The perception need not last lo...
mPFC also inhibits BLC
A TRAUMATIC ENCODING MOMENT • Requires four conditions • Remains permanently biologically active • Stimulation activates a...
Mechanism of TraumatizationEvent sensed by thalamus as UFS Signal sent to LAActivation of Ce Release of NE and Cortisol...
Traumatization at the neural level is the processthat permanently encodes and synapticallyconsolidates linkages between th...
Any of the components recalled, eitherconsciously or subconsciously, activatesthe amygdala and causes the release ofstress...
For each reactivation, we experiencesome or all of the components as ifthey were happening for the first time.
Traumatic Memory Conscious activation or inadvertentreminders lead to the recalling of theevent and its emotional content.
Components of a traumatic memory• Emotional – the affective response to an event• Autonomic – automatic brain functions th...
Dissociated Traumatic Memory Thoughts, feelings and sensations that are experienced when activated by subconscious stimuli...
POTENTIATION OF AMPA GLUTAMATE RECEPTORSAND THEIR STABILIZATION THAT MAKES THEM PERMANENT           THE ABSENCE OF FORGETT...
Mechanism of TraumatizationStimulus [ unimodal and UFS ] pass through thalamus  Signal toAmygdala  Fear / defensive rage...
Thalamo-Amygdala Pathway Generated During             Traumatization                             CORTEX                   ...
Disrupting ATraumatization
Recalling and activating of a traumaticmemory requires working memory  • Cognitive conscious / subconscious (feelings)  • ...
Retrieval of cognitive and somatosensorycomponent into working memory    • Limited storage focus on one thought    • Short...
EFFECT OF STIMULATION OF VARIOUS AREASDELTA WAVE POWER GENERATED AS MULTIPLE OF RESTING STATECHEEK 90XSHOULDER 5-38XPALMS ...
Amygdala Pathway Is Disrupted During              Depotentiation                                                         E...
DE-POTENTIATION OF AMPA RECEPTORS          BY LOW FREQUENCY WAVEACTIVATION OF POST-SYNATPTIC NEURON BY RECALLLOW FREQUENCY...
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
When the Past is always Present
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  • When the Past is always Present

    1. 1. EMOTIONAL TRAUMATIZATION ORIGINS CONSEQUENCES AND CURES
    2. 2. FELITTI, V.J. (2002)The relationship betweenadverse childhood events andadult health: Turning Gold intoLead. The PermanenteJournal Volume 6 :1.
    3. 3. Havening has three components • Recall and activation of an emotional core • Distraction / other sensory input • Havening touch
    4. 4. THE EXTRASENSORY RESPONSE TO TOUCH • Touch modulates GABA release via serotonin • Increase in Delta wave production • Depotentiates activated glutamate receptors
    5. 5. Displacement of thought fromworking memory by distraction • Humming a tune • Counting • Visualizing movement
    6. 6. Extrasensory Responses of Sensory Input Can Change the brain • Smell • Sight • Touch • Taste • Auditory • Kinesthetic
    7. 7. THE PSYCHOSENSORY THERAPIES• INVOLVE THE APPLICATION OF SENSORY INPUT TO ALTER BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING• ARE SENSORY RECEPTOR DRIVEN• ARE ELECTROCHEMICAL IN NATURE• THE RESPONSE TO THE SENSORY INPUT CAN BE LEARNED OR INNATE• THE EFFECT DUE TO AN EXTRASENSORY RESPONSE
    8. 8. UFS
    9. 9. Awareness  vigilance / salience Flight or fight /Freeze response return to normal behavior
    10. 10. Ancient Emotions and Survival Reactive Emotions Fear Defensive rage -- most primitive -- predator driven
    11. 11. Types of Fear• Freeze, Salience • Panic and vigilance •Flaccidity / thanatosis• Flight or fight
    12. 12. FLIGHT/FIGHT → PANIC ↓ THANATOSIS
    13. 13. Panic Prefrontal Cortex taken off line
    14. 14. Fear is stimulated by our senses • Olfactory • Kinesthetic • Auditory • Visual • Gustatory
    15. 15. Fear Activates Physiologic Changes via the Amygdala-- increased heart rate-- pupil dilation-- heightened sensory awareness-- increased oxygen availability-- increased muscle strength-- inhibition of all non survival activities-- increases our ability to store and retrieve events
    16. 16. The Amygdala Activates our Emotions and Coordinates our Survival Responses
    17. 17. OUTFLOW FROM CENTRAL NUCLEUSEmotional StimulusThalamusLA/BLA/AB AmygdalaCe AmygdalaPhysiological Response RESPONSE BRAIN AREA Prepare us for Flight or Fight Sympathetic Activation Aid in Danger Evaluation Prefrontal Cortex Motivate us to Action Nucleus Accumbens Increase Salience Ventral Tegmentum Increase Vigilance Locus Coeruleus Cause Freezing Central Grey Mediate Pain Perception Insula and Amygdala
    18. 18. Encoding a Trauma
    19. 19. EVENT• Increases cortisol and norepinephrine, dopamine• Experienced personally or vicariously• Produces intense emotional response
    20. 20. MEANINGIs about ATTACHMENT • PHYSICAL • PERSONAL • PUBLIC
    21. 21. LANDSCAPEThe neurochemical state ofthe brain at any given time.
    22. 22. INESCAPABILITYA perceived inescapable threateningsituation has the potential to traumatize.The perception need not last long, nor isit necessary for this perception to reachconscious awareness. The prefrontalcortex does not inhibit amygdalaencoding.
    23. 23. mPFC also inhibits BLC
    24. 24. A TRAUMATIC ENCODING MOMENT • Requires four conditions • Remains permanently biologically active • Stimulation activates a part or all of the original physiological response • Emotional component synaptically encoded in the amygdala
    25. 25. Mechanism of TraumatizationEvent sensed by thalamus as UFS Signal sent to LAActivation of Ce Release of NE and Cortisol Inhibition of mPFCContent and context enters amygdala via LA and hippocampusRequirements met Glutamate receptors in amygdala potentiatedBinding of components of event Traumatization occurs
    26. 26. Traumatization at the neural level is the processthat permanently encodes and synapticallyconsolidates linkages between the emotional,cognitive, autonomic, and somatosensorycomponents present during the traumatizingevent.
    27. 27. Any of the components recalled, eitherconsciously or subconsciously, activatesthe amygdala and causes the release ofstress hormones.
    28. 28. For each reactivation, we experiencesome or all of the components as ifthey were happening for the first time.
    29. 29. Traumatic Memory Conscious activation or inadvertentreminders lead to the recalling of theevent and its emotional content.
    30. 30. Components of a traumatic memory• Emotional – the affective response to an event• Autonomic – automatic brain functions that regulate body functions• Cognitive – both conscious and subconscious• Somatosensory – sensed throughout the body as in pain, tingling, numbness and other sensations
    31. 31. Dissociated Traumatic Memory Thoughts, feelings and sensations that are experienced when activated by subconscious stimuli that arise from abnormal retrieval.
    32. 32. POTENTIATION OF AMPA GLUTAMATE RECEPTORSAND THEIR STABILIZATION THAT MAKES THEM PERMANENT THE ABSENCE OF FORGETTING REQUIRES PHOSPHORYLATION OF RECEPTORS PROTEIN KINASE Mζ –EXPRESSED ONLY IN NEURAL TISSUE PROTEIN KINASE Mζ CONTINUALLY PHOSPORALATES AMPA RECEPTORS BECAUSE IT LACKS A REGULATORY DOMAIN DURING ELECTRICAL STIMULATION AT 100Hz THE TRANSLATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE Mζ FROM RNA TO PROTEIN IS ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE Mζ STABLIZES AND MAKES PERMANENT POST- SYNAPTIC AMAPA RECPTORS.
    33. 33. Mechanism of TraumatizationStimulus [ unimodal and UFS ] pass through thalamus  Signal toAmygdala  Fear / defensive rage generated  increases NE andCortisol in amygdala  Inhibition of mPFC  Complex content andContext enter amygdala  Four requirements met  AMPA GlutamateReceptors in BLC amygdala potentiated  BLC modulates binding ofthe components of event  A traumatic memory is stored
    34. 34. Thalamo-Amygdala Pathway Generated During Traumatization CORTEX Emotional Complex Content and Context (directly and via hippocampus) Somato- AMPA ReceptorThalamus Emotion Producing sensory Stimulus Lateral Nucleus of Amygdala Autonomic Electrochemical Transduction Cognitive Sensory Input Components
    35. 35. Disrupting ATraumatization
    36. 36. Recalling and activating of a traumaticmemory requires working memory • Cognitive conscious / subconscious (feelings) • Autonomic • Somatosensory • Emotional
    37. 37. Retrieval of cognitive and somatosensorycomponent into working memory • Limited storage focus on one thought • Short term usage • Part of the pre frontal cortex • Controlled by central executive which modulates attention • Phonological loop auditory and speech information i.e. Verbal commands • Visual spatial sketchpad visual and spatial information i.e. Ride a bike, imagine doing a physical task
    38. 38. EFFECT OF STIMULATION OF VARIOUS AREASDELTA WAVE POWER GENERATED AS MULTIPLE OF RESTING STATECHEEK 90XSHOULDER 5-38XPALMS OF HANDS 5XBACK OF HANDS 1.1XKNEE 1XVIBRATING PADS ON PALMS 3-4XLATERAL EYE MOVEMENT 12-20XGAMUT POINT 1.1XMERIDIAN POINTS VS NON MERIDIAN POINTS 1X
    39. 39. Amygdala Pathway Is Disrupted During Depotentiation Emotional AMPA Somato-STIMULUS Receptor sensory Internalized Lateral Nucleus of Amygdala Autonomic Cognitive
    40. 40. DE-POTENTIATION OF AMPA RECEPTORS BY LOW FREQUENCY WAVEACTIVATION OF POST-SYNATPTIC NEURON BY RECALLLOW FREQUENCY WAVE OPENS CALCIUM CHANNELS IN ACTIVATED NEURONSTHIS ACTIVATES CALCINEURIN FOR WHICH THE AMPARECEPTOR IS THE CRITICAL SUBSTRATEPARTS OF AMPA RECEPTOR DEPHOSPHORYLATEDREMOVAL FROM SURFACE AND THUS NO LONGER ABLE TOTRANSMIT… RECEPTOR IS DE-POTETNTIATEDCALCINEURIN INHIBITORS BLOCK THIS EFFECTTHE TIME COURSE IS IN MINUTES, CONSISTENT WITHCLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

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