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Final Proof of Concept

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Final Proof of Concept

  1. 1. Proof Of Concept
  2. 2. VIDEO INTRODUCTION
  3. 3. VISION COMPANY
  4. 4. SUMMARY EXECUTIVE Advancement in Technology Improvement in Society Increase in Efficiency
  5. 5. PURPOSE Explore Gather Data Protect Advance Robot
  6. 6. REQUIREMENT S MISSION Enter Volcano Increase in Efficiency Endure Landslides Measure Environment Provide Live Video Feed Detect Heat Signature Increase in Efficiency Preserve Empirical Data Initiate Separation Sequence Transmit Data
  7. 7. APPROAC H
  8. 8. ROBOT COMPLETE
  9. 9. TESTING“IT WORKS! IT WORKS!”
  10. 10. Conception Performance Analysis • Testing Approach • Holistic view of the robot • Functionality • Durability • Test Process: • Conception of Test • Performing the test and recording data • Analyzing the results of the test APPROACH TESTING TESTING
  11. 11. DOCUMENTATIO N TESTING
  12. 12. DOCUMENTATIO N TESTING
  13. 13. MANAGEMEN T RISK “Where we prefer our future to burn brighter than our robot”
  14. 14. OVERVIEW Purpose • Mitigation of risk, enactment of opportunities • Communication of current events Philosophy • Decision-making • Safety as a priority • Risk Tolerance MANAGEMENT RISK
  15. 15. Table R1 Table R2 EVALUATION MANAGEMENT RISK
  16. 16. • Identification • Description • Analysis • Resolution DOCUMENTATION MANAGEMENT RISK
  17. 17. ARCHITECTUR E SYSTEMS “We aren’t a part of your system!”
  18. 18. INTRODUCTIO N• Why? • Context: What does this encompass? ARCHITECTURE SYSTEMS
  19. 19. • Architectural Design • System Interface • Resilience and Availability ARCHITECTURE PHYSICAL & LOGICAL ARCHITECTURE SYSTEMS
  20. 20. • Modularity of system • Why can we adapt with ease? • How does it fit the specified criteria? SCALABILITY PERFORMANCE & ARCHITECTURE SYSTEMS
  21. 21. • Made decisions through testing of data • Finalized Architecture • Complete System InteractionVerification PROOF VERIFICATION OF ARCHITECTURE SYSTEMS
  22. 22. Track system • Hard to manufacture • High cost of resources Belt-driven system • Simpler, requires less parts • Assembled within a much shorter time DELTAARCHITECTURE SYSTEMS
  23. 23. Wirebox • Started as simple addition • Evolved into a centralized piece • Multi-functional piece DELTAARCHITECTURE SYSTEMS
  24. 24. MECHANICAL DESIGN & “Blueprints to Success”
  25. 25. DESIGN APPROACH● Used the design process to identify design problems ● Divided the robot into subsystems in order to solve the various tasks ● Subsystems created through the use of design matrices ● Four different subsections: hatch, frame, drive, and entry system. TECHNICAL MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  26. 26. SUBSYSTEM SHatch ● Uses gravity as a passive action for the hatch plates to fall onto the sides. Takes minimal space Frame ● The frame is designed to resist stress and protect the key components within the robot Drive ● Track system chosen for its ability to handle rough terrain Entry System ● A cutting mechanism that will carve out a hole for our robot to enter the volcano MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  27. 27. Design • Initial design:Tracks • Changed to Belt Drive Mechanical • Belt Drive • Pendulum Suspension DRIVEMECHANICAL DESIGN&
  28. 28. FRAME ● Extensive Testing was done. ● Arch Truss shows superiority under 1000 lbs of force. ● Utilizes a circular frame design for rigidity MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  29. 29. HATCH ● Utilizes a Pin-Release Mechanism ● Pin is released from the base of the hatch structure ● Falls to the left and right side of the robot due to gravity ● Hatch fits the front of the new frame ● No issue with its consistency MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  30. 30. ENTRY ● Consistently makes accurate circles ● Spring attached to the back of the cutter ● The blade pushed forward in the proper position ● Ensure the cut of an accurate circle MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  31. 31. VECHICLE • Have data uploaded to it • Escape from volcano intact • Land and transfer data to HQ • Started with a quadcopter for power and stability • Current design is a tricopter for small size ESCAPE MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  32. 32. MATERIAL ● Aluminum 6061 for the main structure of the robot ● ABS (Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) Plastic - temporary material for the prototype’s wirebox, will be replaced by aluminum ● Abandoned Carbon Fiber for realistic budget and manufacturability SELECTION/USAGE OF MECHANICAL DESIGN&
  33. 33. MANUFACTURIN G “Cut-by-cut to the final product"
  34. 34. BANDSAW Advantages Disadvantage s● Machines stock specific sizes ● Essential machining tool creating many parts ● Not very ● Limited to materials MANUFACTURING
  35. 35. CNC MILL Advantages Disadvantage s● Uses x, y, z, and fourth rotational axis ● Improve tabs with MasterCam ● Structural weakened ● machining parts from stock MANUFACTURING
  36. 36. CNC LATHE Advantages Disadvantage s● Uses 2 axes ● Cuts cylindrical parts ● Very accurate versatile ● Limited to 2 MANUFACTURING
  37. 37. DRILL PRESS Advantages Disadvantage s● Used to machine holes ● Creates small that are usually inconvenient other tools ● Less efficient the CNC mill MANUFACTURING
  38. 38. LASER CUTTERAdvantages Disadvantage s● Build frame supports, etc. ● Limited to only acrylic VERSA MANUFACTURING
  39. 39. THE ENGINEERS Advantages Disadvantage s● The most important part the team ● The greatest resource of Tech ● Nothing MANUFACTURING
  40. 40. ELECTRICAL“The Road to Power”
  41. 41. CIRCUIT BOARD PRINTED TOP BOTTOM ELECTRICAL
  42. 42. CIRCUIT BOARD PRINTED ● Master Signal Site ● Battery Eliminator Circuit (BEC) ● Sensors ● Method of Connection ELECTRICAL
  43. 43. SCHEMATIC LAYOUT OF ELECTRICAL
  44. 44. SCHEMATIC LAYOUT OF ELECTRICAL
  45. 45. WIREBOX Material: ● Aluminum ● Electrical Epoxy ELECTRICAL
  46. 46. ● Raspberry Pi ● 9DoF on the origin of IRD ● Environment data collection sensors PLACEMENT SENSOR ELECTRICAL
  47. 47. 1. Use 12 AWG Wire to connect battery to DC loader. 2. Test Nano-tech 14.8V 2200mAh 25-50C 4 Cell Li-Po Battery by setting DC loader to draw Amperes: 1.5, 3, 5, 10,15, 20 3. Run each trial for 30 seconds. 4. Record data and graph. RESULTS BATTERY TEST ELECTRICAL
  48. 48. ● ConsistentCurrent ● Various readings of different demands of power RESULTS BATTERYTEST ELECTRICAL
  49. 49. PROGRAMMIN G “Sending in robots to Burn Brighter”
  50. 50. PROGRAMMING
  51. 51. DEVICES Types • Control Sensors • Environment Sensors • Utility Devices Requirements • Gather data for the robot’s decision-making matrix • Gather data on the volcano environment and sample • Transfer data to the drone and relay to the master computer PROGRAMMING
  52. 52. SENSORSADXL345 Accelerometer • Monitors acceleration to help monitor orientation D6T Thermopile • Designed for thermal tracking HMC5883L Compass • Will be used along with the gyro for gyro-compassing (Removed from robot) ITG3200 Gyro • Will be used to provide rotational control for the robot PING))) Ultrasonic Sensor • Measures distance relative to the robot from solid bodies Luminosity Sensor • Monitors location relative to the inside and outside of the volcano. CONTROL PROGRAMMING
  53. 53. ACCELEROMETER ADXL345 Numbers of Samples of Collected 10 Greatest Percent Error 2238% Average Percent Error 1232% PROGRAMMING
  54. 54. ITG3200 Gyro Numbers of Samples of Collected 24 Greatest Percent Error 28.6% Average Percent Error 12.7% Gyro Drift over Time 0.8474 PROGRAMMING
  55. 55. ITG3200 Gyro Numbers of Samples of Collected 24 Greatest Percent Error 47.7% Average Percent Error 16.9% Gyro Drift over Time 1.235 deg/sec PROGRAMMING
  56. 56. ULTRASONIC SENSOR PARALLAX PING))) Linear Slope Value (Unscaled) 1st: 1.252 2nd: 1.364 3rd: 1.304 Regression- Squared 1st: .9979 2nd: .999 3rd: .9987 Numbers of Samples of Collected 12 (x3 Greatest Deviation Scaled Data 1st: 27.7% 2nd: 21.5% 3rd: 27.7% Average Deviation Scaled Data 1st: 10.4% 2nd:14.8% 3rd: 10.4% PROGRAMMING
  57. 57. • D6TThermopile • TSL2561 Luminosity Sensor SENSORS CONTROL PROGRAMMING
  58. 58. BMP180 Barometer • Measures the pressure within the volcano HTU21D Hygrometer • Measures both humidity and temperature 1K Thermistor • Measures the temperature of the sample SENSORS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMMING
  59. 59. • RFID Transciever • MCP3008 Analog-Digital Converter DEVICES UTILITY PROGRAMMING
  60. 60. FLOW CONTROL HIGH LEVEL PROGRAMMING
  61. 61. INITIALIZATION PHASE AUTONOMOUS PROGRAMMING
  62. 62. CREATION PHASE TUNNEL PROGRAMMING
  63. 63. LOCATION PHASE SAMPLE PROGRAMMING
  64. 64. COLLECTION PHASE DATA PROGRAMMING
  65. 65. SHUTDOWN PHASE EMERGENCY PROGRAMMING
  66. 66. ENDEAVORS FINANCIAL “Limited only by Imagination (and Funding)”
  67. 67. ● Initial Budget for IRD (Investigative Robotic Device) : $1,253.55 USD Sponsorships and Grants • CAMS PTSO Sponsorship: $500.00 • CARPA Funding: $256.00 • VariousTeam Dues: $357.00 • Toyota Motor Corporation, USA Sponsorship: $3,000.00 • GardenaValley Kiwanis Club Donation : $175.00 • Martinez FamilyTrust Fund: $900.00 ● Total Budget for IRD: $5,188.00 ● Total Expenditure (as of February 21, 2015): $2,308.09 ● RemainingAccount Balance (as of Feb. 21, 2015): $2,879.91 EXPENSES BUDGET & FINANCE
  68. 68. EXPENSES BUDGET & FINANCE
  69. 69. EXPENSES BUDGET & FINANCE
  70. 70. EXPENSES BUDGET & FINANCE
  71. 71. SPONSORS OUR ESTEEMED FINANCE
  72. 72. STRATEGY MARKETING “Nova’s the name; selling the robot’s the game.”
  73. 73. Who would want to buy a robot that has the capabilities of volcanic exploration as presented before you? ● Volcanologists o Collection of empirical data o Observation of inner chambers of unexplored volcanoes ● Geologists o Excavation of inner chambers of unexplored volcanoes ● Archeologists o Exploration of inner chambers of unexplored volcanoes o Preservation of sanctity and composition of volcanic and artifacts ● Fire Engineers (Firefighters) o Scout potentially fatal fire scenarios for safety of firefighters MARKET TARGET MARKETING

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