The
Accounting
Cycle:
During the
Period

Financial Accounting

Chapter 2

Spiceland | Thomas | Herrmann
Copyright © 2014 M...
2-2

Learning Objectives
• Identify the basic steps in measuring external
transactions
• Analyze the impact of external tr...
2-3

Functions of Financial Accounting
• Measure business activities of the company
• Communicate measurements to external...
2-4

Part A
Measuring Business Activities

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or...
2-5

Learning Objective 1
Identify the Basic Steps in Measuring External
Transactions.

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Educa...
2-6

External Transactions
• Transactions conducted with a separate economic
entity
• Internal transaction: events that af...
2-7

Capturing Transactions in Accounts
• Account: Summary of all transactions related to
a particular item over a period ...
2-8

Measuring External Transactions

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or dist...
2-9

Learning Objective 2
Analyze the impact of external transactions on the
accounting equation.

Copyright © 2014 McGraw...
2-10

Effects on the Basic Accounting
Equation

• Each transaction will have a dual effect
• An increase on one side will ...
2-11

Understanding Effects of
Transaction
• Ask these questions:
• What is one account affected by the transaction?
• Doe...
2-12

Transactions of Eagle Golf Academy
Date

External Transactions in January

(1) Dec. 1
(2) Dec. 1

(3) Dec. 1
(4)
(5)...
2-13

Transaction 1—Issue Common
Stock
Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000

• What is one account affected by t...
2-14

Transaction 1—Issue Common
Stock
Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000

• What is a second account affected...
2-15

Transaction 1—Issue Common
Stock
Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000

• Do assets equal liabilities plus ...
2-16

Transaction 2—Borrow from the
Bank
Eagle borrows $10,000 from the bank and signs a note for it

Copyright © 2014 McG...
2-17

Transaction 3—Purchase
Equipment
Purchase equipment with cash, $24,000

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All ...
2-18

Transaction 4—Incur Costs for Rent
Pay one year of rent in advance, $6,000

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. ...
2-19

Transaction 5—Incur Costs for
Supplies
Purchase of supplies on account, $2,300

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Educati...
2-20

The Expanded Accounting Equation

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or di...
2-21

Transaction 6—Provide Services for
Cash
Provide service to customers for cash, $4,300

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill ...
2-22

Transaction 7—Provide Services on
Account
Provide service to customers on account, $2,000

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-H...
2-23

Transaction 8—Receive Cash in
Advance of Providing Services
Receive cash in advance from customers, $600

Copyright ...
2-24

Transaction 9—Incur Cost for
Salaries
Pay salaries to workers, $2,800

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All r...
2-25

Transaction 10—Pay Dividends
Pay dividends to stockholders, $200

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights...
2-26

Part B
Debits and Credits

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribut...
2-27

Learning Objective 3
Assess Whether the Impact of External Transactions
Results in a Debit or Credit to an Account B...
2-28

Effects on Account Balances

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distrib...
2-29

Debit and Credit Effects on Accounts in
the Expanded Accounting Equation

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. Al...
2-30

Debit and Credit Effects on Each
Account Type
• A simple memory aid

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rig...
2-31

Learning Objective 4
Record transactions using debits and credits.

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All righ...
2-32

Recording Transactions
• Journal: provides a chronological record of all
transactions
• Journal entry: format used f...
2-33

Recording Transactions—Example
• On December 1, Eagle Golf Academy sells shares
of common stock to investors for cas...
2-34

Learning Objective 5
Post transactions to T-accounts in the general
ledger.

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education....
2-35

Posting
• Posting: process of transferring the debit and
credit information from the journal to individual
accounts ...
2-36

Posting—Example
• On December 1, Eagle Golf Academy sells shares
of common stock to investors for cash of $25,000.
•...
2-37

Summary of External Transactions
Recorded for Eagle Golf Academy

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights...
2-38

Summary of External Transactions
Recorded for Eagle Golf Academy

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights...
2-39

Summary of External Transactions
Recorded for Eagle Golf Academy

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights...
2-40

Learning Objective 6
Prepare a Trial Balance.

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No repro...
2-41

Trial Balance
• A list of all accounts and their balances at a
particular date
• Shows that total debits equal total...
2-42

Trial Balance—Example

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution ...
2-43

End of Chapter 2

Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution witho...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter 2 Financial Ed 3

2,859 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,859
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
168
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
150
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Recall from Chapter 1 that the two functions of financial accounting are to: (1) Measure business activities of the company and (2) Communicate those measurements to external parties for decision-making purposes.
  • In this chapter, we focus on the first role—measuring business activities. In chapter 3, we’ll discuss how these measurements are communicated.Most businesses use a computerized accounting system due to the sheer volume of transactions. In this chapter, however, we will see how transactions are recorded in a manual system to better understand the basics.
  • The business activities, or transactions, we want to measure and communicate are classified as either external or internal.External transactions are transactions the firm conducts with a separate economic entity. A few examples are selling products to a customer, purchasing supplies from a vendor, and paying salaries to an employee.Internal transactions are events that affect the financial position of the company but do not include an exchange with a separate economic entity. A few examples are using supplies on hand and earning revenues after having received cash in advance from a customer.
  • An account summarizes all transactions related to a particular item over a period of time. For example, all transactions affecting cash are summarized in the Cash account. When a company receives cash, the balance of the Cash account increases. When the company pays cash, the balance of the Cash account decreases.Asset accounts include Cash, Supplies, and Equipment. Liability accounts include Accounts Payable, Salaries Payable, Utilities Payable, and Taxes Payable. Stockholders’ equity accounts include Common Stock and Retained Earnings.A chart of accounts lists all account names used to record transactions of a company.
  • Measuring external transactions is a six-step process:Step 1: Gathering information about a transaction. Source documentssuch as sales invoices, bills from suppliers, and signed contracts provide information related to external transactions. These source documents are used to determine the accounts that will be affected. Step 2: Next, the effect of the transaction on elements of the accounting equation must be analyzed. After each transaction, assets must always equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity. Step 3: In the basic accounting equation (Assets = Liabilities + Stockholders’ Equity), accounts on the left side are increased with debits. Accounts on the right side are increased with credits. The opposite is true to decrease any of these accounts. After identifying the accounts affected, we must determine if it must be debited or credited.Step 4: Recording the transaction in a journal with debits and credits.Step 5: Posting is the process of transferring the debit and credit information from transactions recorded in the journal to the T-accounts in the general ledger.Step 6: Preparing a trial balance. A trial balance is a list of all accounts and their balances at a particular date.
  • Recall that the basic accounting equation must always remain in balance; i.e., the left side (assets) equals the right side (liabilities and stockholders’ equity). Each transaction will have a dual effect. If an economic event increases one side of the equation, then it also increases the other side of the equation by the same amount.
  • To understand the effects of each transaction, ask yourself these questions:1. “What is one account in the accounting equation affected by the transaction? Does that account increase or decrease?”2. “What is a second account in the accounting equation affected by the transaction? Does that account increase or decrease?”After noting the effects, ask yourself this:3. ”Do assets still equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity?” The answer to this question must be “yes.”At least two accounts will be affected by every transaction or economic event. While some economic events will affect more than two accounts, most events we record affect only two accounts.
  • The best way to understand the impact of a transaction on the accounting equation is to see it demonstrated by a few examples. Let’s return to the Eagle Golf Academy from Chapter 1.The illustration in this slide summarizes ten external transactions for Eagle in December, the first month of its operations.Note that business activities usually occur in this same order for a new company—obtain external financing, use those funds to invest in long-term productive assets, and then begin normal operations.
  • To begin operations, Eagle Golf Academy needs cash. To generate cash from external sources, Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000. It’s time to ask the three questions we asked earlier:1. What is one account in the accounting equation affected by the transaction? Does that account increase or decrease?Answer: Cash. Cash is a resource owned by the company, which makes it an asset. The company receives cash from investors, so cash and total assets increase by $25,000.
  • 2. What is a second account in the accounting equation affected by the transaction? Does that account increase or decrease?Answer: Common stock. Common stock is a stockholders’ equity account. Issuing common stock to you in exchange for your $25,000 increases the amount of common stock owned by stockholders, so common stock and total stockholders’ equity both increase.
  • 3. Do assets equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity?Answer: Yes.Note: The accounting equation balances. If one side of the equation increases, so does the other side. We can use this same series of questions to understand the effect of any business transaction.
  • 1. What is one account in the accounting equation affected by the transaction? Does that account increase or decrease?Answer: Cash. Cash is a resource owned by the company, which makes it an asset. The company receives cash, so cash and total assets increase.2. What is a second account in the accounting equation affected by the transaction? Does that account increase or decrease?Answer: Notes payable. Notes payable represents the amount owed to a creditor (the bank in this case), which makes it a liability. The company incurs debt when signing the note, so notes payable and total liabilities increase.3. Do assets equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity?Answer: Yes.After two transactions, the accounting equation remains in balance. The total resources of the company equal $35,000. Creditors’ claims to those resources total $10,000 and the remaining resources of $25,000 were provided by stockholders.Regardless of the number of transactions occurring during the period, the accounting equation always must remain in balance. For brevity, we do not address the three-question process for the remaining transactions, but you should ask yourself those questions until you feel comfortable with the process.
  • Once Eagle obtains financing by issuing common stock and borrowing from the bank, the company can invest in long-term assets necessary to operate the business. Buying equipment from a supplier causes one asset to increase and another asset to decrease.Notice that purchasing one asset (equipment) with another asset (cash) has no effect on the category totals in the accounting equation.Once we add Transaction (3) to the accounting equation, we can see in the slide the accounting equation remains in balance.
  • Eagle pays one year of rent in advance, $6,000. Purchasing rent in advance causes one asset to increase and another asset to decrease. Because rent paid is for occupying space in the future, we don’t want to record it as an expense immediately. Instead, we record it as an asset representing the right to occupy the space in the future. We call the asset prepaid rent and report this amount as expense over the next 12 months, as the time we’ve paid for expires.
  • Eagle Academy purchases supplies with the promise to pay cash in the future. We refer to a liability of this type, in which we purchase something on account, as an account payable. The term payable means “to be paid in the future.”Purchasing supplies with the promise to pay cash in the future causes an asset (supplies) to increase and also causes a liability (accounts payable) to increase.
  • We can better understand how revenues increase stockholders’ equity, by expanding the accounting equation. We can divide stockholders’ equity into its two components—common stock and retained earnings. Common stock represents investments by stockholders, while retained earnings represent net income earned over the life of the company that has not been distributed to stockholders as dividends. Both of these amounts represent stockholders’ claims to the company’s resources. Next, we can split retained earnings into its three components—revenues, expenses, and dividends. Revenues are added to stockholders' equity. That’s because revenues increase net income, and net income increases stockholders’ claims to resources. Therefore, an increase in revenues has the effect of increasing stockholders’ equity in the basic accounting equation. Expenses reduce net income, and dividends represent a distribution of net income to stockholders. We subtract expenses and dividends from revenues. Therefore, an increase in expenses or dividends has the effect of decreasing stockholders’ equity in the basic accounting equation.
  • To see an example of how revenue affects the expanded accounting equation, let’s look at the revenue transactions for Eagle Golf Academy. In transaction 6, Eagle provides golf training to customers who pay cash at the time of the service, $4,300.Providing training to customers for cash causes both assets and stockholders’ equity to increase.Notice that an increase in service revenue increases stockholders’ equity by increasing the retained earnings account (+$4,300). Therefore, the accounting equation remains in balance.
  • In transaction 7, customers receive golf training but promise to pay $2,500 cash at some time in the future. The fact that some customers do not pay cash at the time of the service doesn’t prevent Eagle from recording revenue. Eagle has earnedthe revenue by providing services. In addition, the right to receive cash from a customer is something of value the company owns, and therefore is an asset. When a customer does not immediately pay for services with cash, it can be said that services are performed “on account” and we record an account receivable.Providing services to customers on account causes both assets and stockholders’ equity to increase.
  • Companies sometimes receive cash in advance from customers. Eagle receives $600 from customers for golf training to be provided later. In this case, the company cannot report revenue from training now because it has yet to provide the training to earn those revenues. Instead, the advance payment from customers creates an obligation for the company to perform services in the future, and this future obligation is a liability (or debt), most commonly referred to as unearned revenue.Receiving cash in advance causes both assets and liabilities to increase.
  • Companies incur a variety of expenses in generating revenues. Eagle incurs salaries expense of $2,800.Paying salaries for the current period causes assets and stockholders’ equity to decrease.Notice that an increase in Salaries Expense results in a decrease in Retained Earnings (−$2,800). As a result, the accounting equation remains in balance, with both sides decreasing by $2,800.The concept of expenses flowing into retained earnings is the same concept that we see in transaction 6 where revenues also flow into retained earnings, but in the opposite direction.
  • The final financing transaction of Eagle Golf Academy for the month is the payment of a $200 cash dividend to stockholders. Recall from the previous chapter that a dividend represents a payment of cash to the owners (stockholders) of the company. Dividends are not expenses. Instead, dividends are distributions of part of the company’s net income to the owners and thus reduce retained earnings, a stockholders’ equity account. Normally, a company wouldn’t pay dividends after only a month in business, but we make this assumption here for purposes of illustration.
  • As we saw in the previous section, external transactions have the effect of increasing or decreasing account balances. While the terms increase and decrease are well-understood, accountants more often use the terms debit and credit to indicate whether an account balance has increased or decreased. Here, we introduce those terms, discuss their effect on account balances, and show how we record transactions using debits and credits.You will need to learn how to increase and decrease account balances using the terms debit and credit because that’s the language of accounting.
  • Although debit and credit are derived from Latin terms, today debit simply means “left” and credit means “right.”It is easy to visualize the use of these directional signals by means of an accounting convention called a “T-account.” A T-account is a simplified presentation of an account, in the shape of the letter T. Across the top, we show the account title.We refer to increases in accounts on the left side of the accounting equation—assets —as debits. Just the opposite is true for accounts on the right-hand side of the equation. We refer to increases in liabilities and stockholders’ equity as credits. The rules reverse for decreases in accounts: Assets decrease with a credit. Liabilities and stockholders’ equity decrease with a debit.
  • Remember that accounts on the left side of the accounting equation (assets) increase with debits or the left side of an account. Accounts on the right side of the accounting equation (liabilities and stockholders’ equity) increase with credits or the right side of an account.We can expand the basic accounting equation to include the components of stockholders’ equity (common stock and retained earnings) and the components of retained earnings (revenues, expenses, and dividends). Because common stock and retained earnings are part of stockholders’ equity, it follows directly that we increase both with a credit.Revenues increaseretained earnings (“there’s more to keep”). Retained earnings is a credit account, so we increase revenues with a credit. Expenses, on the other hand, decreaseretained earnings (“there’s less to keep”). Thus, we do the opposite of what we do with revenues: We increase expenses with a debit. A debit to an expense is essentially a debit to retained earnings, decreasing the account. Similarly, dividends decreaseretained earnings, so we also record an increase in dividends with a debit.
  • Here’s a simpler way to remember which accounts increase with debits and which with credits. The three accounts on the left, or debit, side of DEALOR—Dividends, Expenses, and Assets—increase with a debit. The three accounts on the right, or credit, side—Liabilities, Owners’ (stockholders’) equity, and Revenues—increase with a credit.
  • A journal provides a chronological record of all transactions affecting a firm. Thus, the term journal entry was used to describe the format for recording a transaction. The format for a journal entry has a place for the date of the transaction, the relevant account names, debit amounts, credit amounts, and a description of the transaction. The account to be debited is first listed; below that, and indented to the right, the credit account is listed. The entry has two amount columns—one for debits, one for credits. As amounts are always expressed in dollars, the dollar sign ($) is not used. As you might expect, the left-hand column is for debits and the right-hand column is for credits. For each journal entry, total debits must always equal total credits. A brief description of the transaction is customarily included at the bottom.
  • To record the transaction between Eagle and its investors in the books of Eagle, Cash is debited and Common Stock is credited for $25,000.
  • The journal records all transactions affecting a company in a chronological order. It is useful for reviewing specific transactions, but no for calculating account balances necessary for preparing financial statements. To calculate balances, information about transactions recorded in the journal is transferred to the specific accounts in the general ledger. The general ledger includes all accounts used to record the company’s transactions.The process of transferring the debit and credit information from the journal to individual accounts in the general ledger is called posting.A T-account is a simplified form of a general ledger account with space at the top for the account title and with two sides for recording debits and credits.
  • To post the transaction between Eagle and its investors in the books of Eagle, the debit to Cash is transferred to the Cash account and the credit to Common Stock is transferred to the Common Stock account.
  • A summary of the first five external transactions recorded for Eagle Golf Academy in the month of December are provided in this slide.
  • A summary of the last five external transactions recorded for Eagle Golf Academy in the month of December are provided in this slide.
  • This slide provides the general ledger accounts after posting the external transactions summarized in the previous slide. Account balances are in bold.
  • A trial balance is a list of all accounts and their balances at a particular date, showing that total debits equal total credits. Another purpose of the trial balance is to assist us in preparing adjusting entries (for internal transactions). Since the trial balance is not a published financial statement to be used by external parties, there is no required order for listing accounts in the trial balance. The trial balance is used for internal purposes only and provides a check on the equality of the debits and credits. However, most companies list accounts in the following order: assets, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, dividends, revenues, and expenses.
  • Using the account balances calculated in general ledger, we can now prepare the trial balance of Eagle Golf Academy.
  • Chapter 2 Financial Ed 3

    1. 1. The Accounting Cycle: During the Period Financial Accounting Chapter 2 Spiceland | Thomas | Herrmann Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    2. 2. 2-2 Learning Objectives • Identify the basic steps in measuring external transactions • Analyze the impact of external transactions on the accounting equation • Assess whether the impact of external transactions results in a debit or credit to an account balance • Record transactions using debits and credits • Post transactions to T-accounts in the general ledger • Prepare a trial balance Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    3. 3. 2-3 Functions of Financial Accounting • Measure business activities of the company • Communicate measurements to external parties for decision making Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    4. 4. 2-4 Part A Measuring Business Activities Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    5. 5. 2-5 Learning Objective 1 Identify the Basic Steps in Measuring External Transactions. Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    6. 6. 2-6 External Transactions • Transactions conducted with a separate economic entity • Internal transaction: events that affect the financial position of the company but do not include an exchange with a separate economic entity Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    7. 7. 2-7 Capturing Transactions in Accounts • Account: Summary of all transactions related to a particular item over a period of time. • Asset accounts: Cash, Supplies, and Equipment • Liability accounts: Accounts Payable, Salaries Payable, Utilities Payable, and Taxes Payable • Stockholders’ equity accounts: Common Stock and Retained Earnings • Chart of accounts: A list of all account names used to record transactions Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    8. 8. 2-8 Measuring External Transactions Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    9. 9. 2-9 Learning Objective 2 Analyze the impact of external transactions on the accounting equation. Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    10. 10. 2-10 Effects on the Basic Accounting Equation • Each transaction will have a dual effect • An increase on one side will increase the other side Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    11. 11. 2-11 Understanding Effects of Transaction • Ask these questions: • What is one account affected by the transaction? • Does it increase or decrease? • What is a second account affected by the transaction? • Does it increase or decrease? • Do assets still equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity? Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    12. 12. 2-12 Transactions of Eagle Golf Academy Date External Transactions in January (1) Dec. 1 (2) Dec. 1 (3) Dec. 1 (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Dec. 1 Dec. 6 Dec. 12 Dec. 17 Dec. 23 (9) Dec. 28 (10) Dec. 30 Sell shares of common stock for $25,000 to obtain the funds necessary to start the business Borrow $10,000 from the local bank and sign a note promising to repay the full amount of the debt in three years Purchase equipment necessary for giving golf training, $24,000 Pay one year of rent in advance, $6,000 ($500 per month) Purchase supplies on account, $2,300 Provide golf training to customers for cash, $4,300 Provide golf training to customers on account, $2,000 Receive cash in advance for 12 golf training sessions to be given in the future, $600 Pay salaries to employees, $2,800 Pay cash dividends of $200 to shareholders Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    13. 13. 2-13 Transaction 1—Issue Common Stock Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000 • What is one account affected by the transaction? • Cash • Does that account increase or decrease? • Increase by $25,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    14. 14. 2-14 Transaction 1—Issue Common Stock Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000 • What is a second account affected by the transaction? • Common Stock • Does that account increase or decrease? • Increase by $25,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    15. 15. 2-15 Transaction 1—Issue Common Stock Eagle sells shares of common stock for $25,000 • Do assets equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity? • Yes, assets increase by $25,000 and stockholders’ equity increase by $25,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    16. 16. 2-16 Transaction 2—Borrow from the Bank Eagle borrows $10,000 from the bank and signs a note for it Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    17. 17. 2-17 Transaction 3—Purchase Equipment Purchase equipment with cash, $24,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    18. 18. 2-18 Transaction 4—Incur Costs for Rent Pay one year of rent in advance, $6,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    19. 19. 2-19 Transaction 5—Incur Costs for Supplies Purchase of supplies on account, $2,300 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    20. 20. 2-20 The Expanded Accounting Equation Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    21. 21. 2-21 Transaction 6—Provide Services for Cash Provide service to customers for cash, $4,300 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    22. 22. 2-22 Transaction 7—Provide Services on Account Provide service to customers on account, $2,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    23. 23. 2-23 Transaction 8—Receive Cash in Advance of Providing Services Receive cash in advance from customers, $600 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    24. 24. 2-24 Transaction 9—Incur Cost for Salaries Pay salaries to workers, $2,800 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    25. 25. 2-25 Transaction 10—Pay Dividends Pay dividends to stockholders, $200 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    26. 26. 2-26 Part B Debits and Credits Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    27. 27. 2-27 Learning Objective 3 Assess Whether the Impact of External Transactions Results in a Debit or Credit to an Account Balance. Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    28. 28. 2-28 Effects on Account Balances Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    29. 29. 2-29 Debit and Credit Effects on Accounts in the Expanded Accounting Equation Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    30. 30. 2-30 Debit and Credit Effects on Each Account Type • A simple memory aid Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    31. 31. 2-31 Learning Objective 4 Record transactions using debits and credits. Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    32. 32. 2-32 Recording Transactions • Journal: provides a chronological record of all transactions • Journal entry: format used for recording transactions • Debits in a transaction must equal its credits Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    33. 33. 2-33 Recording Transactions—Example • On December 1, Eagle Golf Academy sells shares of common stock to investors for cash of $25,000. • Cash debited for $25,000 • Common Stock credited for $25,000 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    34. 34. 2-34 Learning Objective 5 Post transactions to T-accounts in the general ledger. Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    35. 35. 2-35 Posting • Posting: process of transferring the debit and credit information from the journal to individual accounts in the general ledger • General ledger: includes all accounts used to record the company’s transactions • Useful to calculate the account balances • T-account: a simplified form of a general ledger account Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    36. 36. 2-36 Posting—Example • On December 1, Eagle Golf Academy sells shares of common stock to investors for cash of $25,000. • Debit to Cash is transferred to the Cash account • Credit to Common Stock is transferred to the Common Stock account Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    37. 37. 2-37 Summary of External Transactions Recorded for Eagle Golf Academy Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    38. 38. 2-38 Summary of External Transactions Recorded for Eagle Golf Academy Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    39. 39. 2-39 Summary of External Transactions Recorded for Eagle Golf Academy Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    40. 40. 2-40 Learning Objective 6 Prepare a Trial Balance. Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    41. 41. 2-41 Trial Balance • A list of all accounts and their balances at a particular date • Shows that total debits equal total credits • Assists in preparing adjusting entries • Used for internal purposes only • Not published to external parties • Not required to follow an order of listing Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    42. 42. 2-42 Trial Balance—Example Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
    43. 43. 2-43 End of Chapter 2 Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.

    ×