Protective Clothing Webinar

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Employers have the responsibility to provide a place of employment free from recognized hazards. This Magid presentation provides you with multiple protective clothing options for industrial workers that will help keep your employees safe, productive and protected.

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Protective Clothing Webinar

  1. 1. Protective Clothing Webinar
  2. 2. Craig Howell • Director of Clothing Sales • 25 Years Industrial Health & Safety Experience • Specialty in assisting customers with NFPA 70E Compliance • Member ASTM – F18 committee
  3. 3. Protective Clothing Topics • Evaluating Workplace Hazards • Protecting Your Employees – Work clothing and FR apparel standards • Science vs. Real World • Managing Your Clothing Assets – Apparel selection criteria – Rent vs. buy – Home wash vs. industrial laundry
  4. 4. Evaluating Workplace Hazards Hazard Assessment Goals
  5. 5. Hazard Assessment Goals • Identification of hazards presenting unacceptable risk to employee health, safety and productivity. • Selection of practical and feasible control strategies that minimize employee exposures and optimize employee comfort. Identifying and controlling workplace hazards involves both hard data and a savvy understanding of “soft” issues
  6. 6. Hazard Assessment Practices • Many methods, tools and resources exist to help in completion of hazard recognition phase, including: – Standards / OSHA regulations review – Review of records / files – Literature review – Walk-around surveys – Staff interviews
  7. 7. Protecting Your Employees Standards / Regulations
  8. 8. General Standards Applicable to Protective Apparel • OSHA’s General Duty Clause – Employer has the responsibility to provide a place of employment free from recognized hazards • Consider the risks • Address those risks • Develop an action plan • Consumer Products Safety Commission’s Requirements for Clothing Textiles, Title 16 C.F.R. Part 1610 – Purpose of general wearing apparel flammability standards is to keep dangerously flammable textiles and garments made of these textiles out of commerce • Ease of ignition • Flame spread time
  9. 9. Title 16 C.F.R. Part 1610 • Regulation establishes three classes of flammability based on the time of flame spread: – Class 1: Normal Flammability (4+ seconds) – Class 2: Intermediate Flammability (4 to 7 seconds) – Class 3: Rapid, Intense Burning (- 4 seconds) • Not suitable for clothing • Daily-wear sold in U.S. is required to meet Class 1 or 2 requirements.
  10. 10. • Flame resistance: – ASTM D 6413 • Protection from flash fire: – NFPA 2112 • Protection from molten substances: – ASTM F 955-03 • Insuring electrical safety: – NFPA 70E – ASTM F 1506 – NESC® 29 CFR 1910.269 “The employer shall ensure that each employee who is exposed to the hazards of flames or electric arc does not wear clothing that, when exposed to flames or electric arcs, could increase the extent of the injury that would be sustained by the employee.” Standards Specific to Industry
  11. 11. ASTM D 6413 - Flame Resistance • Vertical flame test records: – AFTERFLAME: number of seconds there is visible flame upon removal of the source • After flame must average 2.0 seconds maximum – AFTERGLOW: number of seconds there is visible glow, upon removal of the source • After glow must average 5.0 seconds maximum – CHAR LENGTH: measurement of fabric destroyed by flame. • Char length must average 6.0 inches maximum
  12. 12. NFPA 2112 - Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire • If potential for flash fire is determined to exist, flame resistant apparel must be used that passes ASTM F1930 • ASTM F1930: Simulated flash fire exposure test using a mannequin. • NFPA 2112 revised the document scope to add references to NFPA 2113: Standard on Selection, Care, Use, and Maintenance of Flame Resistant Garments for Protection Against Flash Fire.  
  13. 13. ASTM F955-03 - Evaluating Heat Transfer upon Contact with Molten Substances • After impact: – Visual examination: • Charring, Shrinkage, Metal adherence, & Perforation – Calorimeter – temperature rise • Amount of heat transferred through the fabric or layers of fabric is recorded
  14. 14. NFPA 70E - Standard for Electrical Safety • NFPA 70E overview: – ASTM1506 – Hazard Risk Categories (HRC)
  15. 15. ASTM F1506 Labeling Requirements • Garments shall be labeled with the following information: – Tracking identification code system – Meets requirements of Performance Specification F1506 – Manufacturer’s name – Size and other associated standard labeling – Care instructions and fiber content – Arc rating (ATPV) or arc rating (EBT) – When garments are made with a different number of fabric layers in different areas of the garment, the arc rating for each area shall be designated
  16. 16. NFPA 70E Clothing Requirements • Hazard/Risk Category 0 – Protective Clothing, Nonmelting (according to ASTM F1506-00) or Untreated Natural Fiber • Hazard/Risk Category 1 – FR Clothing, Minimum Arc Rating of 4 cal/cm² • Hazard/Risk Category 2 – FR Clothing, Minimum Arc Rating of 8 cal/cm² • Hazard/Risk Category 3 – FR Clothing, Minimum Arc Rating of 25 cal/cm² • Hazard/Risk Category 4 – FR Clothing, Minimum Arc Rating of 40 cal/cm²
  17. 17. National Electric Safety Code (NESC® ) for Utilities • Definition: – The NESC determines the ground rules to be used by persons while in installation, operation, or maintenance of electric supply and communication lines and associated equipment – The NESC is not law … It’s considered a voluntary consensus standard • Note: OSHA references the NESC when enforcing electrical safety in the utility market.
  18. 18. Science vs. Real World Testing is done in a controlled environment
  19. 19. Science vs. Real World • Organizations must view the specific needs/goals unique to their environment • Remember the testing done is not “real world” • Molten Splash, Electric Arc, Flash Fire … each event is unique.
  20. 20. Managing your Protective Clothing Assets A guide to selection of product and process
  21. 21. Apparel Selection Criteria • Protection value • Cost effectiveness – Initial cost – Life cycle cost • Appearance • Ease of care • Wearer comfort
  22. 22. Cost Effectiveness • Initial Cost Vs Life Cycle Cost – Garment A • Initial Cost, $25.00 • Average Life Cycle, 1.5 years • Total Cost/unit over 3 years, $50.00 – Garment B • Initial Cost, $45.00 • Average Life Cycle, 3 years • Total Cost/unit over 3 years, $45.00 – Cost savings over 3 years with 200 employees @ 5 shirts ea. = $5,000!
  23. 23. Treated FR Fabrics • Current popular options: – FR Cotton • Magid, A.R.C.® • Westex, INDURA® • AmTEX™C100 • Breathable 100% Cotton – FR Cotton Blends (88/12) • Magid, A.R.C.® • Westex, INDURA® UltraSoft® • AmTEX™PLUS • Durable 88% Cotton / 12% High Tenacity Nylon
  24. 24. Inherently FR Fabrics • Current popular options – DuPont Nomex® • Staple in the Refineries • Long Life Cycle – DuPont Protera™ • Comfortable • Durable • Moderately priced – TenCate™ Tecasafe Plus™ • Comfortable / Breathable • Durable • Long Life Cycle
  25. 25. New Innovative Fabric Solutions XISPAL
  26. 26. • PERMANENT PERFORMANCE – won’t wash or wear out • Flame resistant • Wicks moisture • Dries significantly faster than cotton • Skin temperature regulation • Soft, natural fiber hand for superior comfort • Superior durability
  27. 27. • Inherently flame resistant • Base layer Fabric • Total Weight 6 oz. • NFPA 70E Category 2 • Resistant to sparks & extreme high-heat splatters.
  28. 28. • Inherently flame resistant • Lightweight fabric • Excellent wicking properties • Proven fire barrier protection at over 5,000°F (no burn through for over 36 seconds). • Resistant to sparks & extreme high-heat splatters.
  29. 29. • Inherently flame resistant • Lightweight fabric • Moisture Wicking • Breathable • NFPA 70E and 2112 compliant fabric.
  30. 30. XISPAL 841 RS • Flame resistant to molten aluminum • Flame resistant to molten iron • Arc flash resistant, HRC 2 • Inherent FR properties • Industrial laundry friendly • Shrinkage control @ < 3% • All tests done after 50 IL cycles
  31. 31. Rent vs. Buy • Traditional Rental Programs • Direct Purchase Programs • Managed Apparel Programs – N.O.G – Lease and wash
  32. 32. Rental Programs • No upfront costs • Garment replacement included in contract • Mending included in the contract • Insurance that the garment will be cleaned according to the Manufacturer’s guidelines • Typically, 3 to 5 year commitment required • Under – wash ?
  33. 33. Direct Purchase Programs • Complete control of change out to new garment • Home washing, employee must take ownership of the wash process • Flexibility – No contract required – No under – wash – Custom logo – enhanced image • Up front cost
  34. 34. Home Wash vs. Managed Programs • N.O.G. (Not Our Goods) – Direct purchase with a laundry service added • Lease and Wash – Leasing contract for the protective apparel from the industrial laundry company – Wash program attached to the leasing contract
  35. 35. Questions For You To Consider Regarding FR Clothing • Who will clean and repair the garments? – Do they have necessary laundry instructions? – Do they use appropriate FR thread and FR fabrics for repair? • What is your policy concerning underwear and FR underwear? • Do you prohibit polyester, nylon, & polypropylene synthetics? • Do you require that FR clothing always be worn as the outermost layer?
  36. 36. Questions To Ask Your FR Garment & PPE Supplier • What is your traceability procedure? • What are your care & maintenance instructions? • What industry standards do your garments & PPE meet? • Do you have garments available to address all of the known hazards my employee’s will face? • What assistance do you provide after the sale?
  37. 37. Steps to Establishing your PPE Program • Evaluate your environment • Identify all hazards • Apply standards • Select required PPE • Review and select your care policy/program. • Train your workforce to meet your goals
  38. 38. Questions? Craig Howell Director of Clothing Sales Phone: (773) 289-9596 Cell Phone: (248) 719-0407 Email: CraigHowell@MagidGlove.com
  39. 39. Thank You

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