A Garden                        that SingsCreating a Bird Friendly Garden
Design for your bird of choice
Cover
Layers
Shelter
Houses &Deadwood
Shade
An Unlikely-to-be-successful        Bird Garden
Water
On theground
Food
Stuff
Style
Testing
Native Plants
Trees
Trees
Hawthorn
Shrubs
Shrubs
Conifers
Conifers
Grasses
Perennials
SHADE
Annuals
Questions?
Garden that sings
Garden that sings
Garden that sings
Garden that sings
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Garden that sings

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A garden design ppt that is somewhat ineffective without the spoken presentation, but which may inspire you nevertheless.

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  • March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • The four basic ingredients of a successful bird garden: Cover Water & Dust Bathing Sites Nesting Sites Food “ Plant in drifts. If you look to nature, you’ll discover that in the wild, plants usually occur in groups. This promotes cross-pollination, boosts fertility (and, therefore, fruit yield), and makes it easier for migrating birds to spot ripening fruits. Consider vertical layers. Natural areas tend to have vertical layers, each attracting and providing something important to different bird species. Some birds prefer the canopy of tall trees. Others perch in the understory trees. Many build nests in shrubs, while still others find shelter and nesting materials in vines and ground covers. Try to create as many of these layers as possible in your backyard bird refuge. Plant at least one grouping of conifers. These plants provide year-round windbreaks, shelter, and nesting sites. Leave a dead tree or some dead branches on living trees. As long as the branches or tree aren’t in danger of falling on people, buildings, or power lines, these make excellent perches and singing posts for birds. Many birds also like to nest in the cavities of dead trees or branches.” from http://www.mortonarb.org/tree-plant-advice/article/868/trees-and-shrubs-that-attract-birds.html   March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Planting in somewhat contiguous pathways will give your bird friends the cover they need to feel safe. Include a hedge if possible, and some more or less undisturbed areas where you are not regularly trimming, deadheading or weeding. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Recreate the natural world by layering plant, mulch and stone materials. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • “ One of the basic requirements of all creatures is protection for themselves and their young from predators and foul weather conditions. Birds are not exception to the rule. While some species are more adaptable to wide range of protective covers, all species have preferences, and some may be very specific. Ground-frequenting birds like quail and sparrows may prefer the low cover of ornamental grasses and cotoneaster, while orioles and cardinals prefer the protective heights of thorny quinces and hawthorns, or upright junipers… In a recent poll, most bird species preferred household landscapes without cats by an overwhelming margin. We’re only kidding of course, but you don’t have to be a birdbrain to realize even the best-planned birdscape will not attract birds if the family cat decides to lounge there. Cats and birds have just never learned to play well together.” http://www.helpfulgardener.com/design/2003/bird.html March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Leave piles of brush and dead wood standing. Houses and nesting boxes are a must, but choose your bird homes on the basis of their needs, not looks (or offer “pretty” houses as well as the more useful varieties) March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • All the components of a lovely and bird friendly garden are within the scope of all but the shadiest space. In fact, some of the best-looking gardens are shaded, and birds certainly don’t mind trees. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • No continuous cover. In fact, no cover at all. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Since birds can not fly well when wet, precautions towards their welfare against predators need to be taken if providing bird baths. Place your bird baths among conifers and other cover-providing plantings. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Birdbaths and water features that are on the ground are preferred to high pedestal baths. If you slope one edge of any water feature, you will also help out frogs and salamanders. If cats are a concern then bird baths can be placed 2-3' above the ground. Adding a small amount of sand to the bottom of the bath allows birds to grip their feet and not fall over. Water levels should not exceed 2" at the deepest point, and water should remain fresh and full. Leaf mulch, especially under shrubs, is valued by insect eaters. Also—include a dust bath opportunity for your birds. “Provide an area not less than 3 square feet and approximately 6” deep with an equal mixture of sand, loam and sifted wood ash. Dust baths can be edged with brick, stone or wood to increase their appearance. (Hint: Horseshoe pits make great dust baths)” from http://www.helpfulgardener.com/design/2003/bird.html And up high: “Nighthawks, those lovely birds that swoop around city skies at night, flashing the white bands under their wings, have declined in numbers by about 50 percent over the last 40 years. Since their decline has coincided with a decline in gravel roofs, on which nighthawks often nest, wildlife biologists have been experimenting with creating gravel nest pads on roofs. You can do it, too! Create a 9' x 9' gravel pad on your roof (around 14 bucketfuls).” from http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/bird-gardens-47022602 March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Feed new parent birds with serviceberries, wild cherries, and mulberries in the spring, in fall with spicebush, magnolia, sassafras, and flowering dogwood, and in winter with sumac, hawthorn, and crabapple. As for feeders, “The five most useful types of feeders are a ground feeding table, sunflower seed tube, suet feeder, hopper feeder, and a thistle feeder.  If you have one of each, you will attract different kinds of birds… A source of gravel and grit in an open platform feeder helps birds grind food in their gizzard.”  http://www.woodstockconservation.org/Backyard_wildlife.htm March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Dove shelf http://lumberjocks.com/projects/869 low birdbath http://www.bird-house-bath.com/d/Halifax-Bird-Bath.html Bird feeder http://www.birdschoice.com/ViewProduct.aspx?productid=329f0a0a-fa80-4adc-9d6f-770455532109 Nesting materials http://www.birdschoice.com/ViewProduct.aspx?productid=547f7700-b9cc-4e9b-ae19-a058502ea496 March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Any kind of garden can be suitable for birds, from cottage gardens to formal or Asian-inspired themes. As long as you have cover, food, water and nesting opportunities, you will have birds. The only thing to keep in mind is that a too-tidy garden will defeat your efforts to facilitate avian life—birds need mess. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • No matter the type of garden, your first step should be soil testing. This may be the smartest gardening investment you ever make. For example, in Dodge County our soil is alkaline, but many people place ashes on their garden, making it even more alkaline. You may think your soil is great, but when it’s tested you will learn (probably) that you have a desperate need for potassium (no wonder that peony looks puny!) or calcium (that’s why the tomatoes have blossom end-rot!) Well-balanced soils actually help plants withstand drought and insect problems. Trying to acidify the soil is also generally an exercise in futility, except on a plant by plant basis. Acidifying compounds such as ammonium sulfate break down quickly and elemental sulfur can take a while to kick in. If you must have acid-lovers such as Pieris or blueberries either plant in very large pots or group all acid-lovers together and prepare to be constantly adding peat or whatever. Pine needles mulches do not generally contain enough acid to make a significant difference in soil acidity. Here’s the information for the soil test lab: http://uwlab.soils.wisc.edu/madison/ Here are some organic remedies for soil deficiencies: http://www.primalseeds.org/nutrients.htm March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • I am not a native plant absolutist, but native plants are more likely to offer food and shelter native birds prefer. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Amelanchier, Sorbus, Cornus alternifolia March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • River birch, Nyssa sylvatica (‘Madison strain’—need a female plant for fruits, which are considered a messy nuisance by some people—thrushes, catbirds and woodpeckers disagree), Malus (my favorite is ‘Red Peacock’—fragrant, great crabapples for birds, red fall color, disease resistant). March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • There is a reason my garden design business was called Hawthorn Design: Hawthorn (Crataegus) are a near-perfect specimen tree. They are especially valuable in the bird garden, where the berries are appreciated, and the thorns of many species offer birds a sanctuary from predation. “ Hawthorn fruits are consumed by various birds, including the Ruffed Grouse, Robin, Cardinal, Cedar Waxwing, and Northern Mockingbird. Because of its dense branching structure and thorniness, Cock-Spur Hawthorn provides ideal nesting habitat for the Brown Thrasher, Yellow-Breasted Chat, and other songbirds. In open areas, the Loggerhead Shrike uses the thorns to impale the smaller songbirds that are its prey.” from http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/trees/plants/cockspur_haw.html Shown is the Washington Hawthorn, or Crataegus phaenopyrum. Also highly recommended is the Winter King Hawthorn ( C. viridis ). These varieties are resistant to rust and Winter King has few thorns. There are entirely spineless varieties, but these are more likely to develop fungal problems. Just place the tree in a location no one’s eyeballs are likely to be near (hanging over the sidewalk is a BAD idea). And be aware that the flowers don’t smell particularly good to humans (but birds don’t care). March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Viburnums, especially ‘Blue Muffin,’ or any V. dentatum, V. opulus, V. prunifolium, V. trilobum, V. plicatum…OK, just about any Viburnum. Will be eaten by vireos, thrashers, grosbeaks, bluebirds, robins, etc. Ilex verticillata, Clethra alternifolia   March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Sambucus, Lindera ‘Xanthocarpa’ (spicebush), Blueberries March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Shown: Yew berries, Thuja ‘Yellow Ribbon,’ Abies koreana cones Pinus mugo  'Slowmound,’ Thuja occidentalis  'Rheingold,’ ‘. (best list from Birds & Blooms magazine) March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Juniper ‘Icee Blue,’ Chamaecyparis ‘Curly Tops” with frost, Tsuga ‘Cole’s Prostrate’ March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Chasmanthum latifolium, Deschampsia ‘Goldtau,’ Sporobolus heterolepsis March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Panicum ‘Ruby Ribbons, Hakonechloa ‘Beni-Kaze,’ Andropogon ‘Red Bull’ March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Geum, Pulsatilla, Aster March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Coreopsis, Echinacea (‘Tiki Torch’ is the best orange coneflower), Sedum (‘Black Jack’ takes a while to clump up, ‘Xenox’ is a good dark-foliaged sedum. ‘Matrona’ is my favorite all-around sedum, with purple-flushed leaves and stems) March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Veronicastrum, Silphium, Echinops March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Eupatorium, Salvia, Rudbeckia (this one is R. maxima), Penstemon March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Astilbe, Heuchera (this one is ‘Hollywood’) and Lobelia March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Zinnia (esp. Z. angustifolia), Calendula, Cosmos, Tithonia, Loves-lies-bleeding March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Shannon Barniskis [email_address] c2012. March 7, 2012 copyright 2008 Shannon Barniskis
  • Garden that sings

    1. 1. A Garden that SingsCreating a Bird Friendly Garden
    2. 2. Design for your bird of choice
    3. 3. Cover
    4. 4. Layers
    5. 5. Shelter
    6. 6. Houses &Deadwood
    7. 7. Shade
    8. 8. An Unlikely-to-be-successful Bird Garden
    9. 9. Water
    10. 10. On theground
    11. 11. Food
    12. 12. Stuff
    13. 13. Style
    14. 14. Testing
    15. 15. Native Plants
    16. 16. Trees
    17. 17. Trees
    18. 18. Hawthorn
    19. 19. Shrubs
    20. 20. Shrubs
    21. 21. Conifers
    22. 22. Conifers
    23. 23. Grasses
    24. 24. Perennials
    25. 25. SHADE
    26. 26. Annuals
    27. 27. Questions?

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