Shifting Terrains, Crossing Boundaries Digital Libraries are Personal and Social Again!<br />Shalini R. Urs<br />Internati...
Agenda<br />Shifting Terrains of the library profession <br />Crossing Boundaries of knowledge <br />Digital Library—Grand...
ShiftingTerrains<br />“<br />“The More Things Change<br />The More They Remain The Same” <br />
The Library <br />In the ancient times, libraries were essentially places for scholarship, archives of government and busi...
Alexandrian Library <br />
Nalanda Library ( 4th Century India)  <br />   The library of Nalanda, known as Dharma Gunj (Mountain of Truth) or Dharmag...
Library as a Metaphor <br />Library is a metaphor for dynamic spaces for human information interactions (informational exp...
Library as a collection <br />In the post Gutenberg era —we  seemed to have moved to the idea of library as a collection <...
Library as Social Knowledge/Public Memory<br />Based on and extrapolating the  notion of Science as Public Knowledge (Zima...
Library as an outsourced personal information store <br />Historically, libraries are one of the early ‘out sourcing’ busi...
Libraries as cultural institutions <br />David Carr (2006) in “ Minds in Museums and Libraries:The Cognitive Management of...
Crossing Boundaries <br />
Crossing Boundaries <br /><ul><li>The concept of boundaries has been used frequently over the last decade in organisationa...
  Crossing boundaries of various kinds is an essential feature of networked world. In an increasingly globalised and netwo...
On the one hand the new economy  and work force is organized around global networks yet on the other hand the work process...
 This is also true of individuals and societies — it is both a case of distributed public cognition and a personalized ind...
Digital Libraries <br />Ackerman said “ This is not only unwise, it is unnecessary since we could provide mechanisms for s...
Digital Libraries <br />The contemporary digital libraries transcend geographical and disciplinary boundaries, cross over ...
Digital Libraries <br />Examination of the some definitions of digital libraries then (first era) and now (second era) ref...
A working definition of digital library<br />"Digital libraries are organizations that provide the resources, including th...
DELOS Digital Reference Model and manifesto<br />"The DELOS Network of Excellence on Digital Libraries now envisions a Dig...
Contemporary Visions of DLs<br /> <br />Its main role has moved from static storage and retrieval of information to facili...
Contemporary Visions of DLs<br />In  its new “avatar” of digital libraries, the emphasis has shifted from technical to soc...
Contemporary Visions of DLs<br />From open source and open access movement to wisdom of the crowd movements, today’s world...
Why DL 2.0 ?<br />Do we need to develop DL 2.0 just because we want to join the new whizz kid on the block?<br /> Not nece...
DL- Indian Scenario <br />Indian DL Conferences :<br />Pre Web digital content issues was the InfoTex 93 - An Internationa...
The major conferences that following the web and the Internet era and events which created the buzz around the field  of d...
The digitization and digital library projects<br />Digital Library of India (DLI) Initiative is the Indian part of the Uni...
The Traditional Knowledge Digital Library (TKDL) is a knowledge repository of the traditional knowledge setup by the NISCA...
The Muktabodha Digital Library and Archiving Project was begun in 1995 as a manuscript microfilming project focusing mainl...
Vidyanidhi digital library and eScholarship portal project at the University of Mysore (www.vidyanidhi.org.in), which bega...
DL : the grand challenges<br />Personal information management<br />Long term relationships between humans and information...
Grand Challenges…<br />Flat applications and liquid content <br />New social and service affordances <br /> New business a...
Grand Challenges …<br />Expand what can be searched<br />Use context for information retrieval <br />Integrate information...
Digital world is redefining scientific theory<br />‘Sixty years ago, digital computers made information readable. Twenty y...
Web 2.0 – Features <br />
Future Users ???<br />2 billion <br />
Future  Aspirations ???<br />Internet Safari program at ISiM<br />
Reaching the Unreached through mobiles and social media<br />How do we help the emerging world/society/markets to benefit ...
The Unseen Power of Billion Hands<br />reCAPTCHA is a system, originally developed at Carnegie Mellon University that uses...
Realizing the power of billions <br />The reCAPTCHA program originated with Guatemalan computer scientist Luis von Ahn, wh...
Participatory model …<br />One of the important focus areas for digital libraries is the preservation of cultural/ heritag...
Some Examples from India (AvaajOtalo )<br /><ul><li>Avaaj Otalo (literally, “voice stoop”) is an interactive voice applica...
Avoice-based system  accessible through mobile phones
The most popular feature is asking questions and browsing others’ questions and responses on a range of agricultural topic...
A lively social space with norms,persistent moderation, and  provide for both structured interaction with institutionally ...
The simple menu-based navigation was readily learned, with users preferring numeric input over speech.</li></li></ul><li>N...
Targeting the 15-45 age group ( urban, semi Urban and Rural) with mobile phones, this programme is aimed at addressing the...
Gyanpedia<br />Gyanpedia is an online digital content repository generated by children and teachers of rural government sc...
Gyanpedia<br />Gyanpedia allows anyone with an Internet connection to download or upload any knowledge/information in any ...
Some Efforts at ISiM<br />Personalized, Social  Digital Libraries to support  individualized learning <br />
@ ISiM<br />Google  has introduced an internet based learning / teaching environment, called Google Gooru.<br />The Gooru ...
Google Gooru — Features<br />Gooru is an innovative – interactive learning/teaching environment offering  several features...
1. Live Classroom / Guest Speaker<br />Facilitates either the teacher (or a guest speaker) to log in and address the class...
2. Classplan<br />A basic plan for a particular class or a particular lecture session. <br />Gooru allows the teacher to c...
3. Classbook<br />Classbook gives enhanced classroom learning experience that leverages on the social web and extend the t...
Fluidity by integrating web content<br /><ul><li>Teachers can very conveniently use rich web content organized as a playli...
WikiGyan<br />WikiGyan is a portmanteau of the words-<br />Wiki (Hawaian) meaning "quick" <br />and <br />Gyan ( in Sanskr...
Premised on …<br />“If Knowledge is power, then information is empowering”<br />Data …data everywhere …but no information ...
Data Ecosystem<br />Quite a lot of open data<br />Open Set of Services and Applications ( APIs)<br />Consumers and Creator...
Where ???<br />Governments, Non Government Organisations, Academic researchers and others routinely collect data on differ...
Some very good examples and exemplars <br />Dataplace - one-stop source for housing and demographic data about your commun...
Eliminating Information Friction—why?<br />Information Friction impedes –<br />Economic transactions (Ex. Farmers selling ...
Now some gyan  about WikiGyan <br />WikiGyan is a project to build such an information sharing platform for development da...
Gyan about WikiGyan…<br />It is a suite of the tools that lets people to upload spreadsheets, down load them, build databa...
Wikigyan@ISiM<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br /><ul><li>Wikigyan is...
We believe such a platform which can offer actionable insights to the public at large.
Our platform will achieve this through an online Internet- based data warehousing system that can scale to a large number ...
When the user uploads the excel files of structured data integrates the same into the data warehouse.
 Once the data integrated, then provides for  the visualization for the same updated data.</li></li></ul><li>WikiGyan Proc...
Xampp for Linux 1.6: XAMPP is great because integrates open source components like  Linux, Apache server, PHP, MySql and t...
Pentaho BI<br />Pentaho BI - is a is Open Source application software for enterprise reporting, analysis, dashboard, data ...
Government<br />
Wikigyan@ISiM<br />
Wikigyan@ISiM<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />WikiGyan Work Flow:...
WikiGyan – Metadata Module<br />
Data Visualisation through charts <br />
DL 2.0 - Five key characteristics<br />
Crossing over boundaries <br />DL is  NOT a collection, it is an information space and an experience. No boundaries or bor...
Co-creation <br />Management  Guru C K Prahalad  popularized the notion of co-creation . According to him product innovati...
Interaction <br />Today the mass media such as TV have become interactive. They provide for participation and viewer inter...
Annotations as a sign of engagement <br />Study of Marginalia in English Renaissance texts  shows that students of the tim...
Dynamic Content to personalisation<br />Information resources do not come neatly packaged as indivisible ( atomic) Units. ...
DLs are social again <br />As cautioned by Ackerman (1994) in one of the early DL94 conference position  DLs have “to be c...
Five Laws of <br />DL 2.0 <br />
Digital Libraries: Future Scenarios <br />DLs are to be information spaces offering information experiences to users. A co...
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Mortenson Distinguished Lecture2010

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Transformation of digital libraries through web 2.0 and mobile revolution. This presentation argues that the shifting terrains of digital libraries are turning them into social and personal again

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Mortenson Distinguished Lecture2010

  1. 1. Shifting Terrains, Crossing Boundaries Digital Libraries are Personal and Social Again!<br />Shalini R. Urs<br />International School of Information Management<br />University of Mysore<br />Mysore, India<br />shalini@isim.ac.in<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Shifting Terrains of the library profession <br />Crossing Boundaries of knowledge <br />Digital Library—Grand Challenges<br />DL 2.0 and its potential and possibilities <br />Some Examples and Exemplars <br />
  3. 3. ShiftingTerrains<br />“<br />“The More Things Change<br />The More They Remain The Same” <br />
  4. 4. The Library <br />In the ancient times, libraries were essentially places for scholarship, archives of government and business transactions, and places for intellectual discourse, in addition to being social and cultural institutions.<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Alexandrian Library <br />
  7. 7. Nalanda Library ( 4th Century India) <br /> The library of Nalanda, known as Dharma Gunj (Mountain of Truth) or Dharmagañja (Treasury of Truth), was the most renowned repository of Buddhist knowledge in the world at the time. Its collection was said to comprise hundreds of thousands of volumes, so extensive that it burned for months when set aflame by Muslim invaders. <br />
  8. 8. Library as a Metaphor <br />Library is a metaphor for dynamic spaces for human information interactions (informational experiences )<br />This is the notion that we get when we consider the libraries of Alexandria or Nalanda<br />The library is a metaphor for that space(physical or cyberspace )<br />This metaphor is quite old ( even in traditional societies such as India)<br />
  9. 9. Library as a collection <br />In the post Gutenberg era —we seemed to have moved to the idea of library as a collection <br />And organising the collection and findability took centre stage <br />Access became the “mantra” and libraries became synonymous with documentary collections <br />The idea of a meeting place continued but more as an adjunct rather than central to the notion of library. <br />
  10. 10. Library as Social Knowledge/Public Memory<br />Based on and extrapolating the notion of Science as Public Knowledge (Ziman, 1969) libraries have been considered as social knowledge – accessible and available to one and all, while individual knowledge /individual memory is accessible and available to only oneself ( Kemp, 1976).<br />Invention of writing helped civilisation to externalise the individual knowledge <br />
  11. 11. Library as an outsourced personal information store <br />Historically, libraries are one of the early ‘out sourcing’ business models<br />Customers( users) began to outsource their information store and activities to libraries<br />Information activities transited from ‘private’ places (individual activities) to public places (outsourced to professionals/profession)<br />Libraries moved from being private places to “public places”<br />
  12. 12. Libraries as cultural institutions <br />David Carr (2006) in “ Minds in Museums and Libraries:The Cognitive Management of Cultural Institutions” examines the shared cognitive dimensions of cultural institutions like museums, libraries, and parks, and suggests that they make similar situations for transmitting information.<br />Libraries (archives , museums, parks …) are places that offer cognitive experiences to people integrating the past with the present bringing a history of knowing, reflecting and understanding . <br />
  13. 13. Crossing Boundaries <br />
  14. 14. Crossing Boundaries <br /><ul><li>The concept of boundaries has been used frequently over the last decade in organisational studies, information systems and communication research. Boundaries can be thought of as discontinuities of some form.
  15. 15. Crossing boundaries of various kinds is an essential feature of networked world. In an increasingly globalised and networked world we can expect boundary-crossing in all our interactions —both formal and informal communications .</li></li></ul><li>Crossing Boundaries <br /><ul><li> Understanding the significance and diversity of these boundary crossing phenomenon, and ways of </li></ul>variously exploiting or overcoming them, is likely to be of increasing significance in all forms of knowledge transfer. <br /><ul><li> The network metaphor and its fusion of a range of theories( including the Social Networking Analysis) provides a useful perspective on interpreting the role and position of digital libraries against the wider background of research into the networking phenomenon</li></li></ul><li>Crossing Boundaries <br /><ul><li> Research across various disciplines, reflect this trend – boundary crossing and has also led to the notion of “ Networked Individuality.”
  16. 16. On the one hand the new economy and work force is organized around global networks yet on the other hand the work process is increasingly individualized.
  17. 17. This is also true of individuals and societies — it is both a case of distributed public cognition and a personalized individualized cognition.</li></li></ul><li>Digital Libraries <br />Digital Libraries (DLs), a field that is coterminous with the Internet, has entered teenage and is on the cusp of change<br />In the first era technical aspects dominated research and discourse and researchers were immersed deeply in confronting the technological challenges of building DLs. Thus in the beginning digital libraries seemed cold and impersonal. <br />Ackerman (1994) cautioned “… be careful not to carelessly obliterate some of the important features of current libraries… (Do not) remove social exchange and interaction, focusing narrowly on the technical mechanisms of information access.<br />
  18. 18. Digital Libraries <br />Ackerman said “ This is not only unwise, it is unnecessary since we could provide mechanisms for social exchange and interaction within our systems.”<br />The second era, is witness to a renaissance of the social dimension of libraries with the realization that DLs are to be usable and engaging.<br />With the advent and adoption of web 2.0 paradigm and technologies, DLs are crossing borders and are back to being personal and social again. <br />The web 2.0 technologies have helped turn the realization into a reality. <br />
  19. 19. Digital Libraries <br />The contemporary digital libraries transcend geographical and disciplinary boundaries, cross over diverse content types from scholarly to trivia and document genres of every kind and embrace digital objects of different hues and formats from manuscripts to maps, from to datasets to courseware, from images to music, from presentation slides to laboratory notes. <br />The notion of metadata is transformed and fine grained to include everything from author to annotations to access modes. <br />
  20. 20. Digital Libraries <br />Examination of the some definitions of digital libraries then (first era) and now (second era) reflects this transformation/ avatar of digital libraries<br />Digital Libraries are <br />personal and social again! <br />
  21. 21. A working definition of digital library<br />"Digital libraries are organizations that provide the resources, including the specialized staff, to select, structure, offer intellectual access to, interpret, distribute, preserve the integrity of, and ensure the persistence over time of collections of digital works so that they are readily and economically available for use by a defined community or set of communities".(Digital Library Federation , 1999)<br />
  22. 22. DELOS Digital Reference Model and manifesto<br />"The DELOS Network of Excellence on Digital Libraries now envisions a Digital Library as a tool at the centre of intellectual activity having no logical, conceptual, physical, temporal, or personal borders or barriers on information. <br />It has moved from a content-centric system that simply organizes and provides access to particular collections of data and information, to a person-centric system that aims to provide interesting, novel, personalized experiences to users. <br /> <br />
  23. 23. Contemporary Visions of DLs<br /> <br />Its main role has moved from static storage and retrieval of information to facilitation of communication, collaboration, and other forms of interaction among scientists, researchers, or the general public on themes that are pertinent to the information stored in the Digital Library."<br />
  24. 24. Contemporary Visions of DLs<br />In its new “avatar” of digital libraries, the emphasis has shifted from technical to social aspects of personalisation, interaction, collaboration and co-creation of content and commentaries.<br /> “Co-creation” model advocated by management gurus C.K. Prahalad and VenkatRamaswamy exemplifies a landscape where in, “Knowledgeable, web-empowered consumers will usher in … (a system) characterized by "co-creating value through personalized experiences unique to the individual consumer." <br />
  25. 25. Contemporary Visions of DLs<br />From open source and open access movement to wisdom of the crowd movements, today’s world is characterized by mass collaboration. <br />Digital Library 2.0 are characterised by - “being everywhere”; “no barriers”; “spirit of participation”; “flexible and best-of-breed systems”; being “human and recognizing that its users are human too”<br />The new DL is all about collaborative network of different digital libraries, and networking of DLs with clients.<br /> DL 2.0 offers a personal learning landscape—<br />MyDL: a personal and personalized digital library. <br />
  26. 26. Why DL 2.0 ?<br />Do we need to develop DL 2.0 just because we want to join the new whizz kid on the block?<br /> Not necessarily. Web 2.0 is not just about new tools for content co creation and management, but also about ‘wikinomics of DL’.<br />The “ crowd sourcing” and the “Wikinomics” model is the zeitgeist thing. Zeitgeist, referring to the moral and intellectual trends of a given era characteristic of an age or generation has some similarities to Thomas Kuhn's idea of scientific paradigms<br />It is about a sustainable<br /> and scalable economic model<br /> for digital libraries<br />(Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everythingby Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams, December 2006)<br />
  27. 27. DL- Indian Scenario <br />Indian DL Conferences :<br />Pre Web digital content issues was the InfoTex 93 - An International Conference on Database Production and Distribution: Resources, Technology and Management, held at Bangalore, 28 Nov - 1 Dec 93 organized by Informatics India Limited. <br />The first digital library conference of India was the SIS 96 – the 15th Annual Convention and Conference, 18-20 Jan 1996, Bangalore organized by the Society for Information Sciences. <br />
  28. 28. The major conferences that following the web and the Internet era and events which created the buzz around the field of digital libraries were the ICADL 2001 held in Bangalore(www.icadl2001.org) <br />ICDL (International Conference on Digital Libraries) organized by TERI (the Energy Research Institute) during 2004, 2006 and now in 2010<br />
  29. 29. The digitization and digital library projects<br />Digital Library of India (DLI) Initiative is the Indian part of the Universal Digital Library and the Million Books to the Web projects. <br />The Million Books to the Web project is a collaborative project between the Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and many more organizations across the US, India and China <br />
  30. 30. The Traditional Knowledge Digital Library (TKDL) is a knowledge repository of the traditional knowledge setup by the NISCAIR ( National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources, CSIR <br />The objective of this library is to protect the ancient and traditional knowledge of the country from exploitation such as bio-piracy and unethical patents (http://www.niscair.res.in/). <br />
  31. 31. The Muktabodha Digital Library and Archiving Project was begun in 1995 as a manuscript microfilming project focusing mainly on photographing at-risk and rare palm-leaf Vedic Shrauta Ritual manuscripts from both private collections and from libraries. (http://www.muktabodha.org/).<br />Kalasampada: Digital Library- Resource for Indian Cultural Heritage (DL-RICH) project sponsored by Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MCIT) (http://www.ignca.gov.in/dlrich/) <br />
  32. 32. Vidyanidhi digital library and eScholarship portal project at the University of Mysore (www.vidyanidhi.org.in), which began as a pilot project in 2000 to demonstrate the feasibility of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) in India. Today Vidyanidhi funded by the Ford Foundation is one of the largest repositories of Indian theses with more than 15000 full texts and 150,000 metadata records. <br />
  33. 33. DL : the grand challenges<br />Personal information management<br />Long term relationships between humans and information collections and systems<br />Role of digital libraries, digital collections and other information services in supporting teaching, learning, and human development<br />Active environments for computer supported collaborative work<br />(Clifford Lynch : Dlib , July 2005)<br />
  34. 34. Grand Challenges…<br />Flat applications and liquid content <br />New social and service affordances <br /> New business and organizational patterns <br /> The new information hubs<br /> The long tail and attention <br />(Lorcan Dempsey, Ariadne, 2006)<br />
  35. 35. Grand Challenges …<br />Expand what can be searched<br />Use context for information retrieval <br />Integrate information spaces into everyday life <br />Reduce data to actionable information<br />Improve productivity through information access. <br />(Ronald Larsen, NSF Workshop , 2003)<br />
  36. 36. Digital world is redefining scientific theory<br />‘Sixty years ago, digital computers made information readable. Twenty years ago, the Internet made it reachable. Ten years ago, the first search engine crawlers made it a single database and now Google and like-minded companies are treating this massive corpus as a laboratory of the human condition.<br /> ( Chris Anderson, 2009)<br />It is time for us redefine (revisit) the library idea and look at libraries as information spaces seamlessly integrating formal and informal communication crossing boundaries of all kinds.<br />
  37. 37. Web 2.0 – Features <br />
  38. 38. Future Users ???<br />2 billion <br />
  39. 39. Future Aspirations ???<br />Internet Safari program at ISiM<br />
  40. 40. Reaching the Unreached through mobiles and social media<br />How do we help the emerging world/society/markets to benefit from the opportunities that DLs provide for inclusive growth especially education for all. How can DLs be the platform for learning and participating in the economic activities through ecommerce?<br />
  41. 41. The Unseen Power of Billion Hands<br />reCAPTCHA is a system, originally developed at Carnegie Mellon University that uses CAPTCHA to help digitize the text of books<br />reCAPTCHA supplies subscribing websites with images of words that optical character recognition (OCR) software has been unable to read. The system is reported to solve over 100 million captchas every day (as of October 2010)*<br />* Wikipedia <br />
  42. 42. Realizing the power of billions <br />The reCAPTCHA program originated with Guatemalan computer scientist Luis von Ahn, who realized "he had unwittingly created a system that was frittering away, in ten-second increments, millions of hours of a most precious resource: human brain cycles."[<br />Google acquired reCAPTCHA in 2009 and is using reCAPTCHA for digitizing the archives of the New York Times.Twenty years of The New York Times have been digitized and the project hopes to have the 110 other years done by the end of 2010<br />Google itself is an example of monetizing the billion clicks <br />
  43. 43. Participatory model …<br />One of the important focus areas for digital libraries is the preservation of cultural/ heritage materials<br />Here is another example of the social web strategy for the same <br />UNESCO World Heritage <br />Artstor<br />
  44. 44. Some Examples from India (AvaajOtalo )<br /><ul><li>Avaaj Otalo (literally, “voice stoop”) is an interactive voice application for small-scale farmers in Gujarat, India.
  45. 45. Avoice-based system accessible through mobile phones
  46. 46. The most popular feature is asking questions and browsing others’ questions and responses on a range of agricultural topics.</li></li></ul><li>Some Examples (AvaajOtalo )<br /><ul><li>For all 51 farmers this was the first experience participating in an online community of any sort.
  47. 47. A lively social space with norms,persistent moderation, and provide for both structured interaction with institutionally sanctioned authorities and open discussion with peers
  48. 48. The simple menu-based navigation was readily learned, with users preferring numeric input over speech.</li></li></ul><li>Nokia – Ovi Life Tools<br /><ul><li>Inspired by the vision of transforming society beyond selling mobile phones, Nokia has begun a programme called Nokia-Ovi Life tools in various parts of the word including India
  49. 49. Targeting the 15-45 age group ( urban, semi Urban and Rural) with mobile phones, this programme is aimed at addressing the knowledge pains across four verticals – Agriculture, Education, Entertainment, and Healthcare</li></li></ul><li>Nokia – Ovi Life Tools<br />Agriculture<br />Education<br />Bridges the Information Gaps<br />Entertainment<br />Healthcare<br />
  50. 50. Gyanpedia<br />Gyanpedia is an online digital content repository generated by children and teachers of rural government schools across India. <br />Gyanpedia-an initiative of Digital Empowerment Foundation with support from Media Lab Asia, is a Comprehensive, multilingual, dynamic virtual platform for country wide content exchange program for the learning community – children as well as teachers.<br />
  51. 51. Gyanpedia<br />Gyanpedia allows anyone with an Internet connection to download or upload any knowledge/information in any form whether word, power point, video, image etc<br />
  52. 52. Some Efforts at ISiM<br />Personalized, Social Digital Libraries to support individualized learning <br />
  53. 53. @ ISiM<br />Google has introduced an internet based learning / teaching environment, called Google Gooru.<br />The Gooru pilot project in India has been started with 11 different schools, assisting grade 5 teachers in their teaching and making the learning experiences of students better and enchanting<br />ISiM has been given the unique opportunity to implement Gooru for the first time, in the higher education milieu <br />
  54. 54. Google Gooru — Features<br />Gooru is an innovative – interactive learning/teaching environment offering several features that have the potential to significantly enhance the learning experience of students<br />The key feature and functionality of Gooru is its ability to cross borders by integrating the class room teaching, rich web resources, digital text book with annotations, and leveraging on the social web to provide a networked learning experience.<br />
  55. 55. 1. Live Classroom / Guest Speaker<br />Facilitates either the teacher (or a guest speaker) to log in and address the class.<br />The learning experience of a class enhanced by a guest lecture who is brought in by the teacher.<br />
  56. 56. 2. Classplan<br />A basic plan for a particular class or a particular lecture session. <br />Gooru allows the teacher to create a teaching plan and enhance it by suggesting additional resources and videos, which would augment that session<br />
  57. 57. 3. Classbook<br />Classbook gives enhanced classroom learning experience that leverages on the social web and extend the teacher directed social learning beyond the classroom into the digital textbook<br />Personalize the textbook with notes, bookmarks and highlights, share their notes with their classmates, discuss a topic or ask a question bring the magic of classroom learning into the digital textbook. <br />
  58. 58. Fluidity by integrating web content<br /><ul><li>Teachers can very conveniently use rich web content organized as a playlist and guest speakers to make the classroom very engaging</li></li></ul><li>WikiGyan <br />Data for development and democracy<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />
  59. 59. WikiGyan<br />WikiGyan is a portmanteau of the words-<br />Wiki (Hawaian) meaning "quick" <br />and <br />Gyan ( in Sanskrit) meaning “knowledge”. <br />
  60. 60. Premised on …<br />“If Knowledge is power, then information is empowering”<br />Data …data everywhere …but no information and no insights<br />
  61. 61. Data Ecosystem<br />Quite a lot of open data<br />Open Set of Services and Applications ( APIs)<br />Consumers and Creators of data <br />Data usually is quite free ( Census Data, Elections data; development data…)<br />Social Media ( huge resource of data and metadata) <br />Most of the time accessible directly through APIs<br />
  62. 62. Where ???<br />Governments, Non Government Organisations, Academic researchers and others routinely collect data on different aspects of society – such as poverty, literacy, education, health, and others. <br />These data generally end up in tons of reports, and spreadsheets. <br />In case of Government, most of these data are public domain, in case of others; they are generally ready to share. <br />
  63. 63. Some very good examples and exemplars <br />Dataplace - one-stop source for housing and demographic data about your community, your region, and the nation( www.dataplace.org) <br />Timepedia Chronoscope (Turning Tables into time machines)(http://timepedia.org/chronoscope/)<br />Freebase ( www.freebase.com)<br />Many eyes from IBM (http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/)<br />Swivel (www.swivel.com) <br />Gapminder ( www.gapminder.org) <br />
  64. 64. Eliminating Information Friction—why?<br />Information Friction impedes –<br />Economic transactions (Ex. Farmers selling their produce without having access to market information). <br />Policy choices and prioritizing (Policy makers taking decisions without right socio, economic, and demographic data).<br />Development Choices and making use of opportunities ( Ex. rural women not aware of the government welfare schemes for women; students using online learning materials, when it is not available locally/ or on campus)<br />Effective Management (epidemic control and management disaster management, terrorism management …)<br />
  65. 65. Now some gyan about WikiGyan <br />WikiGyan is a project to build such an information sharing platform for development data. What is envisaged is a system that enables people to upload their data, tag and add metadata, integrate data, visualize the trends and mapped data. Specifically - <br />WikiGyan enables people/organizations to share data on the society (elections, health, education…) and gain insights through data analytics and intelligence.<br />
  66. 66. Gyan about WikiGyan…<br />It is a suite of the tools that lets people to upload spreadsheets, down load them, build databases, enable data warehousing, visualize data in different ways, and gain insights through data analytics. <br />For simplicity, we call it a combo of a YouTube for spreadsheets and Wikipedia for structured information<br />
  67. 67. Wikigyan@ISiM<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br /><ul><li>Wikigyan isa common platform people to upload/download the data, automatic integration of data and visualization on a large scale.
  68. 68. We believe such a platform which can offer actionable insights to the public at large.
  69. 69. Our platform will achieve this through an online Internet- based data warehousing system that can scale to a large number of NGOs, verticals, data formats, visualization needs and consumers (typically the common public).
  70. 70. When the user uploads the excel files of structured data integrates the same into the data warehouse.
  71. 71. Once the data integrated, then provides for the visualization for the same updated data.</li></li></ul><li>WikiGyan Process Model<br />Redeeming the wasteland of class projects. Turning student class projects into powerhouse of tools development. <br />Harnessing students’ power. The vast majority of the student community across the nation, continuously build, refine and fine-tune the system and enable NGOs, Governments, and researchers to put ‘ data to work’<br />Kindling the social responsibility nerve. Voluntary involvement of industry, and academic experts. <br />Empowering the Government and the NGOs in their mandate of transforming society <br />
  72. 72. Xampp for Linux 1.6: XAMPP is great because integrates open source components like Linux, Apache server, PHP, MySql and takes only a few commands to get a fully integrated LAMP system up and running. <br />Mediawiki 1.13.1 :MediaWiki offering a host of features, including an optional file upload feature, a very comprehensive mark-up, very good internationalization support has been chosen. MediaWiki is written in PHP and uses a MySQL database. Installation is incredibly simple. It is built to work in almost any Web - hosting environment where HTML can also be used.<br />
  73. 73. Pentaho BI<br />Pentaho BI - is a is Open Source application software for enterprise reporting, analysis, dashboard, data mining, workflow and ETL capabilities for Business Intelligence (BI) needs. It is easy to use and scalable and is being endorsed by the open source community. It has comprehensive capabilities include data integration, data mining and business intelligence and reporting. Kettle and WEKA are integrated parts of Pentaho <br />
  74. 74. Government<br />
  75. 75. Wikigyan@ISiM<br />
  76. 76. Wikigyan@ISiM<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />Education | Empowerment | Engagement<br />WikiGyan Work Flow:<br />
  77. 77. WikiGyan – Metadata Module<br />
  78. 78. Data Visualisation through charts <br />
  79. 79. DL 2.0 - Five key characteristics<br />
  80. 80. Crossing over boundaries <br />DL is NOT a collection, it is an information space and an experience. No boundaries or borders of content types or such confining /limiting notions<br />Catherine Marshal (2004) defines a boundary—in the context of digital libraries—as, "...something that tends to separate, to interpose; a boundary is a perceptible seam in the social fabric, the technological infrastructure, or a physical setting or may span all three", and goes on to urge “...we should design creatively to get around the interpretative boundaries like document, collection, and metadata boundaries.”<br />1<br />
  81. 81. Co-creation <br />Management Guru C K Prahalad popularized the notion of co-creation . According to him product innovations happen at those companies that are working with their customers as activists and collaborators in the creation process.<br />DLs are no longer about collection building, it is about collection sharing and co-creation.<br />Look at examples – Wikipedia, Youtube, Flickr, slideshare<br />DLs also need to/ have moved towards this new paradigm. <br />2<br />
  82. 82. Interaction <br />Today the mass media such as TV have become interactive. They provide for participation and viewer interaction.<br /> Annotations are one form of interactions. To "annotate" is "to make or furnish critical or explanatory notes or comment”.<br />In the digital library context, annotations can serve broadly to createnew information resources, to interpret existing ones, to access resources in new ways, and to support the effective use of resources <br />3<br />
  83. 83. Annotations as a sign of engagement <br />Study of Marginalia in English Renaissance texts shows that students of the time were routinely taught that simply reading a book was insufficient. In order to have a "fruitful interaction" with a text. Marking it up with one's thoughts and reactions was considered essential. <br />Marginalia and other signs of engagement and use – even such apparently content-neutral additions as food stains –were considered as valuable evidence of reader reaction, and the place of the physical information object in people's lives. Providing users the ability to annotate digital content also creates new streams of naturalistic evaluation data, evidence of engagement stronger than a page view or a link to the collection item from another page.<br />
  84. 84. Dynamic Content to personalisation<br />Information resources do not come neatly packaged as indivisible ( atomic) Units. Some of the content is real time observational data. <br />As Svenonius points out in her book the intellectual foundation of Information organization – documents with uncertain boundaries which are ongoing…have identity problem…you cannot step into the same river …<br />DLs need to confront the challenges of this flowing stream of content without boundaries and leverage on making it personal and contextual <br />4<br />
  85. 85. DLs are social again <br />As cautioned by Ackerman (1994) in one of the early DL94 conference position DLs have “to be careful not to carelessly obliterate some of the important features of current libraries… (Do not) remove social exchange and interaction, focusing narrowly on the technical mechanisms of information access. <br />This is not only unwise, it is unnecessary since we could provide mechanisms for social exchange and interaction within our systems. Simply put, we do not need to remove the social world from our systems”.<br />With web 2.0, DLs are very much social again. We can perhaps make it more social than ever before <br />5<br />
  86. 86. Five Laws of <br />DL 2.0 <br />
  87. 87. Digital Libraries: Future Scenarios <br />DLs are to be information spaces offering information experiences to users. A combination of Mobiles and “wisdom of the crowds” model.<br />Information Experiences are affordable, personal, and accessible through Mobiles<br />We can leverage on the mobile revolution sweeping across the world (India: more than 600 million cell phones) for mobile learning. With mobiles the last mile of connectivity has been overcome. Mobiles and internet will be the silver bullet for social transformation.<br />
  88. 88. References <br />Ziman, J., “Public Knowledge: the Social Dimension of Science“ ; Cambridge University Press, 1968 <br />Kemp, D. A. , “Nature of knowledge: and introduction for librarians”; Clive Bingley, 1976, <br />Carr, David ., “A place not a place: reflection and possibility in museums and libraries” ; Rowman Altamira, 2006.<br />Catherine Marshall and A. B. Brush. “Exploring the relationship between personal and public annotations” In Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (Tuscon, AZ, USA, June 07 - 11, 2004). JCDL '04. ACM, New York, NY, 349-357. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/996350.996432<br /> <br />
  89. 89. References…<br />Mark S. Ackerman.“Providing Social Interaction in the Digital Library” In Proceedings of the Digital Libraries Workshop - DL’94 : Springer-Verlag, 1994<br />Leonardo Candela et al. “Setting the Foundations of Digital Libraries; The DELOS Manifesto” D-Lib Magazine, March/April 2007. Volume 13 Number 3/4. Available at http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march07/castelli/03castelli.html. Accessed on March 3, 2010. <br />
  90. 90. John Bollen et al. “Trend Analysis of the Digital Library Community” D-Lib Magazine January 2005, Volume 11 Number 1. Available at http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january05/bollen/01bollen.html. Accessed on March 3, 2010.<br />C.K. Prahalad and VenkatRamaswamy. “The Future of Competition: Co-Creating Unique Value with Customers” USA: Penguin books, 2004<br />Thomas S. Kuhn. “The Structure of Scientific Revolutions”. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1962.<br />Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams “Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything” USA: Penguin books, 2008<br />
  91. 91. Thank you <br />THANK YOU<br />

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