Tpm final

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Tpm final

  1. 1. The TPM Total Productive Maintenance BY SHAILENDRA DAF
  2. 2. OUTLINE OF THE PRESENTATION <ul><li>Introduction of TPM </li></ul><ul><li>TPM principle </li></ul><ul><li>Structure(pillars) of TPM </li></ul><ul><li>TPM implementation step </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation strategy </li></ul><ul><li>TPM benefit </li></ul><ul><li>Case study </li></ul>
  3. 3. 1. TPM definition <ul><li>A company-wide team-based effort to build quality into equipment and to improve overall equipment effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Total </li></ul><ul><ul><li>all employees are involved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>it aims to eliminate all accidents, defects and breakdowns </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Productive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>actions are performed while production goes on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>troubles for production are minimized </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maintenance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>keep in good condition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>repair, clean, lubricate </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. 1. TPM definition <ul><li>TPM combines the traditionally American practice of preventive maintenance with Total Quality Control and Total Employee Involvement , to create a culture where operators develop ownership of their equipment, and become full partners with Maintenance, Engineering and Management to assure equipment operates properly everyday. </li></ul>
  5. 5. 3. TPM principles <ul><li>Increase Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) </li></ul><ul><li>Improve existing planned maintenance systems </li></ul><ul><li>The operator is the best condition monitor </li></ul><ul><li>Provide training to upgrade operations and maintenance skills </li></ul><ul><li>Involve everyone and utilize cross-functional teamwork </li></ul>
  6. 6. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM Education and training Safety and environmental management Autonomous Maintenance Planned Maintenance Equipment and process improvement Early management of new equipment Process quality management TPM in the office
  7. 7. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.1. Autonomous Maintenance (1) <ul><li>Train the operators to close the gap between them and the maintenance staff, making it easier for both to work as one team </li></ul><ul><li>Change the equipment so the operator can identify any abnormal conditions and measure deterioration before it affects the process or leads to a failure </li></ul>
  8. 8. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.2. Equipment and process improvement <ul><li>Objective : maximize efficiency by eliminating waste and manufacturing losses </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing losses are categorized into 13 big losses: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Equipment losses (6) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manpower losses (4) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Material losses (3) </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.2. Equipment and process improvement 4.2.1. Equipment losses Downtime loss Speed loss Quality loss Equipment failure / breakdowns Set-up / adjustments Minor stopping / idling Reduced speed Process errors Rework / scrap
  10. 10. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.2. Equipment and process improvement 4.2.2. Manpower and material losses Manpower losses Material losses Cleaning and checking Waiting instructions Waiting quality confirmation Material yield Energy losses Waiting materials Consumable material losses
  11. 11. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.2. Equipment and process improvement 4.2.3 Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) <ul><li>OEE are determined by combining the availability and performance of your equipment with the quality of parts made </li></ul><ul><li>OEE measures the efficiency of the machine during its planned loading time . </li></ul>
  12. 12. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.2. Equipment and process improvement 4.2.3 Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) Overall Equipment Effectiveness = Availability x Performance x Quality Yield Availability Downtime loss Speed loss Performance Quality Yield Quality loss
  13. 13. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.2. Equipment and process improvement 4.2.3 Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) Overall Equipment Effectiveness = Availability x Performance x Quality Yield Availability = time available for production - downtime time available for production Performance = ideal cycle time x number of parts produced operating time Quality Yield = total number of parts produced - defect number total number of parts produced
  14. 14. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.3. Planned maintenance <ul><li>Objective : establish Preventative and Predictive Maintenance systems for equipment and tooling </li></ul><ul><li>Natural life cycle of individual machine elements must be achieved </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Correct operation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Correct set-up </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cleaning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lubrication </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Retightening </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback and repair of minor defects </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quality spare parts </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 15. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.4. Early Management of new equipment <ul><li>Objective: establish systems to shorten </li></ul><ul><ul><li>new product or equipment development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>start-up, commissioning and stabilization time for quality and efficiency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New equipment needs to be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>easy to operate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>easy to clean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>easy to maintain and reliable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have quick set-up times </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>operate at the lowest life cycle cost </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.5. Process Quality Management <ul><li>Definition: a process for controlling the condition of equipment components that affect variability in product quality </li></ul><ul><li>Objective : to set and maintain conditions to accomplish zero defects </li></ul><ul><li>Quality rate has a direct correlation with </li></ul><ul><ul><li>material conditions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>equipment precision </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>production methods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>process parameters </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.6. TPM in administrative and support departments <ul><li>Administrative and support departments can be seen as process plants whose principal tasks are to collect, process, and distribute information </li></ul><ul><li>Process analysis should be applied to streamline information flow </li></ul>
  18. 18. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.7. Education and training <ul><li>TPM is a continuous learning process. </li></ul><ul><li>2 major components </li></ul><ul><ul><li>soft skills training: how to work as teams, diversity training and communication skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>technical training: upgrading problem-solving and equipment- related skills </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. 4. Eight major pillars of TPM 4.8. Safety and environmental management <ul><li>Assuring safety and preventing adverse environmental impacts are important priorities in any TPM effort </li></ul>
  20. 20. 5. TPM Implementation 12 steps Preparation Kick-off Implementation Announcement to introduce TPM Introductory education campaign for the workforce TPM Promotion (special committees) Establish basic TPM policies and goals Preparation and Formulation of a master plan Develop an equipment management program Develop a planned maintenance program Develop an autonomous maintenance program Increase skills of production and maintenance personnel Perfect TPM implementation and raise TPM levels Stabilization Develop early equipment management program Invite customers, affiliated companies and subcontractors
  21. 21. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY <ul><li>PROCESS ORIENTED STRATEGY </li></ul><ul><li>HUMAN ORIENTED STRATEGY </li></ul>
  22. 22. HUMAN ORIENTED STRATEGY <ul><li>Human-oriented strategy is, generally, strategies that actively involve human administrative </li></ul><ul><li>application of management methods in achieving high extent of TPM. </li></ul><ul><li>Three important aspects </li></ul><ul><li>(1) Top management commitment and leadership </li></ul><ul><li>(2) Total Employee Involvement, and </li></ul><ul><li>(3) Training and Education. </li></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>Increasing motivation: changing peoples attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing competency and peoples skills </li></ul><ul><li>Improving the work environment, so that it supports the establishment of a program for implementing TPM </li></ul>
  24. 24. PROCESS ORIENTED STRATEGY <ul><li>The primary goal of TPM is to achieve the ultimate target of Zero Loss and Zero Breakdown </li></ul><ul><li>The sequential step-wise procedure of Process-oriented Strategy begins with: </li></ul><ul><li>I ) IDENTIFYING FAILURES OR LOSSES AND ANALYZE CAUSES </li></ul><ul><li>II) SETTING IMPROVEMENTS TO ELIMINATE FAILURES AND LOSSES; </li></ul><ul><li>III) CONFIRMING AND CONSOLIDATING RESULTS. </li></ul>
  25. 25. 6. TPM Benefits <ul><li>Increased equipment productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced equipment downtime </li></ul><ul><li>Increased plant capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Lower maintenance and production costs </li></ul><ul><li>Approaching zero equipment-caused defects </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced job satisfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Increased Return On Investment </li></ul>
  26. 26. CASE STUDY <ul><li>IMPLEMENTING TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE (TPM) IN MANUFACTURING ORGANISATION </li></ul>
  27. 27. WHY FAILURE OF TPM
  28. 28. PROBLEM <ul><li>Introducing TPM in a developing country, such as INDIA, is still considered a major challenge due to several non-conducive environments in the adoption and implementation process. Lack of commitment and leadership from top management & resistance from the employee involved in the TPM program is also regarded as another major reason that explains why TPM fails in many local organizations. Employees refused to endure extra maintenance responsibilities without any rewards, recognition or compensation. </li></ul>
  29. 29. HYPOTHESIS <ul><li>H1 : Extent of Human-oriented strategy will be positively related to Extent of TPM implementation. </li></ul><ul><li>H2 : Extent of Process-oriented strategy will be positively related to Extent of TPM implementation. </li></ul><ul><li>H3 : Human-oriented strategy has greater impact on Extent of TPM level then Process-oriented strategy. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Regression result for Operational Strategy and Extent of TPM Implementation General Training Top Executive Commitment Maintenance Training Supportive TPM environment Workplace Improvement 0.205 0.040 0.271 0.071 0.197 R2 Adj. R2 F Value 0.32 0.28 8.47**
  31. 31. Two stage regression analyses with Human-oriented strategy entered first in the model Model 1: Supportive TPM environment, General Training, Maintenance Training, Top Executive Commitment Model 2: Supportive TPM environment, General Training, Maintenance Training, Top Executive Commitment, Workplace Improvement Dependent variable: Extent of TPM. R R2 Adjusted R2 Δ R2 F Model 1: Model 2: 0.54 0.29 0.26 0.29 9.40 0.57 0.32 0.28 0.03 3.66
  32. 32. Two stage regression analyses with Process-oriented strategy entered first in the model Model 1 : Workplace Improvement Model 2: Workplace Improvement, Supportive TPM environment, General Training, Maintenance Training, Top Executive Commitment, Dependent variable: Extent of TPM. R R2 Adjusted R2 Δ R2 F Model 1: Model 2: 0.41 0.17 0.16 0.17 18.64 0.57 0.32 0.28 0.15 5.12
  33. 33. CONCLUSION <ul><li>It can be concluded that the extent of both the human and process oriented strategies would lead to higher TPM implementation in the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Thus the management has to balance both these strategies in order to achieve the maximal effect of implementation. </li></ul>
  34. 34. REFERENCES <ul><li>Nakajima, S. (1988). Introduction to TPM. Cambridge: Productivity Press. </li></ul><ul><li>sang, A. H. C. & Chan, P. K. (2000). TPM Implementation in China: A Case Study, International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 17(2), 144-157. </li></ul><ul><li>Scontrino, M. P. (1995). TPM in Process Industry, Personnel Psychology, 48(2), 456-458. </li></ul><ul><li>Shim bun, N. K. (1995). TPM Case Studies, Portland OR: Productivity Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Suzuki, T. (1994). TPM in Process Industry, Portland OR: Productivity Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Thiagarajan, T. & Zaire, M. (1997). A Review Of Total Quality Management In Practice: </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding The Fundamentals Through Examples Of Best Practice Applications – </li></ul><ul><li>Part 1, The TQM Magazine, 9(4), 270-286. </li></ul><ul><li>Tsang, A. H. C. & Chan, P. K. (2000). TPM Implementation in China: A Case Study, </li></ul><ul><li>International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 17(2), 144-157. </li></ul><ul><li>Weeks, B. et al., (1995), Are We Ready for TQM? A Case Study, Production and Inventory </li></ul><ul><li>Management Journal, 36(4), 27-32. </li></ul><ul><li>Yamashina, H. (2000). Challenge to World Class Manufacturing, International Journal of </li></ul><ul><li>Quality & Reliability Management, 17(2), 132-143. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Questions ?

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