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Expository Paragraph

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writing expository paragraph

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Expository Paragraph

  1. 1. Paragraph Writing Expository Paragraph
  2. 2. What is a Expository Paragraph? Expository paragraph is a mode of writing in which the purpose of the author is to inform, explain, describe, or define his or her subject to the reader. Examples of expository texts are textbooks, encyclopedias, scientific books/journals, atlases, directions, guides, biographies, newspapers.
  3. 3. This type of expository text is often used to present events such as the French and Indian War (in history class) or cell division (in biology class). 1. Sequence or Time Order 2. Listing 3. Compare and Contrast 4. Cause and Effect 5. Problem-Solution Types of Expository Paragraph Listing (or description) is used to explain the features of an object or event. Biology textbooks list the features of reptiles, giving their body temperature, reproductive habits, eating habits, etc. Compare and contrast involves discussing similarities and differences. A Social Studies book might compare the Government of the United States and the Government of Great Britain. A cause-effect pattern outlines reasons for events. The author describes an event (such as the American Revolutionary War) and explains what caused the event and the effects that followed from it. Problem-Solution pattern discuss a problem and then suggest possible solutions. A history author might discuss the events of FDR’s life in terms of problems he faced and how he solved them.
  4. 4. Before Reading Expository Texts A. Walking through a selection B. Using an anticipated guide C. Using K-W-L D. Using word webs E. Using a read-aloud F. Using a think-pair-and-share G. Previewing H. Skimming and scanning
  5. 5. When Reading Expository Texts a) Marking and highlighting b) Questioning c) Clarifying d) Visualizing e) Predicting f) Reading and connecting g) Directed Reading h) Predicting i) Using graphic organizers j) Using reciprocal reading questions k) Retelling l) Making double-entry journal
  6. 6. Gathering Your Thoughts a) Discussing in pairs and small groups b) Clustering details c) Drawing a place d) Brainstorming e) Quick writing f) Using anecdotes g) Comparing and contrasting h) Using a graphic organizer i) Using story board
  7. 7. When Reading Expository Texts a) Marking and highlighting b) Questioning c) Clarifying d) Visualizing e) Predicting f) Reading and connecting g) Directed Reading h) Predicting i) Using graphic organizers j) Using reciprocal reading questions k) Retelling l) Making double-entry journal

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