“Where Do Games Fit in Employee or Public Training?” By Bob Waddington- Serious Play Conference 2012

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Bob Waddington Speaks about “Where Do Games Fit in Employee or Public Training?” at the Serious Play Conference 2012
ABSTRACT:
This session will provide a behind the scenes look at the HumanSim Blast™; (and perhaps another game) a game in which usFers respond to a virtual terrorist bombing outside a busy train station. It was designed to maximize the performance of first responders when faced with the unfortunate reality of potential blast-related events. The game offers a safe, virtual environment in which users can make mistakes and try different techniques without risking victims’ lives or those of their peers.

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“Where Do Games Fit in Employee or Public Training?” By Bob Waddington- Serious Play Conference 2012

  1. 1. “Where Do Games Fit in Employee or Public Training?” Bob Waddington SimQuest, LLC. bwaddington@simquest.com August 21-23, 2012 Redmond, WAAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  2. 2. August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  3. 3. August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  4. 4. What I’mPlaying…August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  5. 5. August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
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  8. 8. Where Do Games Fit?August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  9. 9. FEBRUARY 2007Archives of Surgery detailed the findings of a 2002 study thatappears to show that doctors who play videogames are better atdelicate Laparoscopic procedures.STUDY CITED“Surgeons who had played video games in the past for more thanthree hours per week made 37 percent fewer [surgical] errorswere 27 percent faster and scored 42 percent better overall thansurgeons who never played video games.”August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  10. 10. JULY 2008 SimQuest Open Surgery SimulatorAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  11. 11. What’s in a Name?? Interactive video Multimedia CD-ROM CD-I Virtual reality e-Learning Distance LearningAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  12. 12. What’s in a Name?? Situation Simulator Edutainment Playful Learning Virtual Reality Virtual Worlds SimulationAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  13. 13. Serious Games… …those not intended for the entertainment market http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serious_gameAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  14. 14. Three Types of Students Those who • are truly self-motivated • go through the motions • tune us out EDUCAUSEreview Sept/Oct 2005August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  15. 15. Case StudyAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  16. 16. 2M 1st Responders 10% motivated to professional improvement 800k need to be engagedAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  17. 17. Sim-Game Based Training Systems for Scene and Patient Management Following Blast Injury from Explosives Including Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Tom Reeves, PhD, UGA Supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Award No. W81XWH-09-C-0060.August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  18. 18. the ChallengeCommon errors made by responders• Enter scene too early or get too close with ambulance or personnel before scene is cleared• Gain access with no egress (blocked exits)• Don’t triage; just treat and transport 1st person• Risk casualties by moving them to unsafe triage/treatment areas• Improperly assess and/or treat casualtiesAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  19. 19. the ChallengeBlast events introduce other challenges• Scene safety, triage and treatment require different approaches to scene and patient management• Additional risks to responding personnel from secondary explosion or shooters• Different injury patterns• Visual triage is not enoughAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  20. 20. the ChallengeTraining• Large scales exercises are expensive• Any sized exercise is logistically challenging• Current training is mostly delivered through lecture and power point – some training on manikinsAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  21. 21. the SolutionUtilizing 1st person gaming technology• Develop self-contained blast-specific modules that augment existing combat medic tactical combat casualty care (TCCC)• Provide lessons learned from bomb attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan, Madrid, London, etc.• Use real-world blast scene injury data• Provide safe individual/independent trainingAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  22. 22. Continuum of Learning Acquire Knowledge  Learn Skills  Apply Knowledge & Skills • Cognition • Cognition • Application of • Facts • Methods • Cognitive Skills • Vocabulary • Procedures • Psychomotor Skills • Definitions • Problem Solving • Conative Skills • General Details HumanSim Blast Power- Instructor Point Drill & Practice Led Training (Interactive) (CBT/e-Learning) Authentic e-Learning / Authentic Tasks Power- Reference Interactive TutorialsTextbooks Point Tools (CBT/e-Learning) Case Scenarios Serious (Decisionmaking & Critical Thinking Skills) Games Augmented Part-Task Experiential Reality Trainers Simulations Mobile Social Learning Performance Networks True/False Multiple Choice Fill-in-the-Blank Assessments Evolving Technology & Models of Instruction and www.seriousplayconference.comAugust 2012 Assessment
  23. 23. Project Description A first-person blast response game that allows users to respond to a terrorist bombing outside a busy train station. Users are assessed on their ability to • quickly and accurately assess victims’ injuries and tag them for treatment • assess the scene and identify additional risks prior to declaring the scene safe.August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
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  26. 26. Evaluation Strategy Evaluate • game design • usability • content • user choices • user path through scenarioAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  27. 27. Iterative reviewsAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  28. 28. Formative Evaluation • Multidisciplinary Reviews • End-user Reviews • Players Feedback • Formal Study (IRB) • Implement findings into design and gameAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  29. 29. Formal ReviewsAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  30. 30. August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  31. 31. Formal ReviewsAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  32. 32. Formal Study Primary methods Locations User tracking data North Carolina Evaluation questionnaires Virginia (EMT-B Class) Individual interviews Maryland “I’ve never seen the students so engaged” Chauncey Bowers CSP, ARM, Central Piedmont Community CollegeAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  33. 33. Study Participants • 42 first responders • 22 males • 20 females • 22 EMS, • 3 firefighter, • 17 police/security personnel • age range: 17 to 56 • average age: 34August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  34. 34. Open Answer QuestionsWhat is the strongest aspect of the BLAST program?The most frequent responses included realism, its interactive nature, and the fact that itprovides the opportunity to practice triage skills.What is the weakest aspect of the BLAST program?Responses focused on usability issues, especially problems with using the mouse to controlmovements and decisions on screen., especially the lag between mouse movements andcorrelating screen movements .If you could improve anything in the BLAST program, what would it be?The most salient request for improvements concerned the clarity of the feedback, especially withthe need to put a “face” on the victims to improve the context of the scoring and feedback .Other desired improvements included making the mouse more responsive with less lag time andincreasing the noise and confusion presented in the scenario to make it more realistic.What other feedback can you provide concerning the BLAST program?Most of the study participants encouraged further development of additional scenarios for theBLAST program. Most of the concluding comments were very complimentary of the program. August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  35. 35. “Real” User Feedback“The feedback in the program is poor.”“Terrible mouse movement.”“… the ‘hand’…”“Improve instructions on how to use it.”“More carnage. More range of injuries.”August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  36. 36. When “Real” Users Strike Back What is the weakest aspect of the BLAST program?August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  37. 37. When “Real” Users Strike Back What is the strongest aspect of the BLAST program?August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  38. 38. When “Real” Users Agree 88% Similar programs should be developed 79% Program provided an engaging learning opportunityAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  39. 39. When “Real” Users Agree 69% State-of-the-art for (educational games) 76% Should be used by most first responders 65% Program is very realisticAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  40. 40. When “Real” Users Strike Back“I love the fact that it is visual, it has a reallife sense to it.”“…playing this and seeing differentscenarios will help me be able to managetriage casualties.”“…games such as this give a realisticscenario while taking (away) some of thestress a real situation would create.”August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  41. 41. Unexpected FindingsGroup settings • fosters discussion • peers can assist with controlsProvides “lab” to a lecturePre/post larger scales exercisesAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
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  43. 43. Pandemic ResponseAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  44. 44. METH LAB “I need something more engaging. I’m starting to see their eyes roll” August Vernon: Operations Officer, Forsyth County Office of Emergency ManagementAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  45. 45. Continuum of Learning Acquire Knowledge  Learn Skills  Apply Knowledge & Skills • Cognition • Cognition • Application of • Facts • Methods • Cognitive Skills • Vocabulary • Procedures • Psychomotor Skills • Definitions • Problem Solving • Conative Skills • General Details Power- Instructor Point Drill & Practice Led Training (Interactive) (CBT/e-Learning) Authentic e-Learning / Authentic Tasks Power- Reference Interactive TutorialsTextbooks Point Tools (CBT/e-Learning) Case Scenarios Serious (Decisionmaking & Critical Thinking Skills) Games Augmented Part-Task Experiential Reality Trainers Simulations Mobile Social Learning Performance Networks True/False Multiple Choice Fill-in-the-Blank Assessments Evolving Technology & Models of Instruction and www.seriousplayconference.comAugust 2012 Assessment
  46. 46. Conclusions• Market is asking for engaging applications (not necessarily games)• Games for games sake won’t work• Incorporate off-the-shelf games into learning• Understand target end-user learning environment• Consider the ‘group play’ element into game design• Design games instructors can use August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  47. 47. Conclusions• Games as part of lab/breakout groups• Pre or post exercise• Retention/Sustainment training• Situational Awareness• Fundamentals – vocabulary• Team Building August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  48. 48. ConclusionsSerious Games need to involve more than the gameplay itself; delivery medium, end-user playenvironment, and the game’s integration into thegreater curriculum need to be factored for effectiveserious game design. August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  49. 49. Questions?August 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com
  50. 50. “Where Do Games Fit in Employee or Public Training?” Thank you! Bob Waddington SimQuest, LLC. bwaddington@simquest.comAugust 2012 www.seriousplayconference.com

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