The Museum as Game Space:
Creating educational
games for museum galleries
Why I Love Serious Games
2008:
Fascinating!
1981: Not fascinating…
The Getty Villa
Digital Museum Gallery
Games
Mystery @ the Museum
Boston Museum of Science (2003)
Played by parent and child
teams with a Pocket PC
and a walkie-talkie
Ghosts of a Chance
Smithsonian American Art Museum (2008-
2010)
Murder at the Met
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(2012)
Maryland Science Center
PlanetMania (2013)
Capture the Museum
National Gallery of Scotland (2013)
The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty
Center
Switch – Phases I & II (2012 & 2013)
Games at the Getty
Villa
Creating a Game for the Getty Villa
Phase I – Paper Prototype (2010)
Phases II & III – Partnering with the
Rochester Institute of Technology
Design Document
iPod Prototype
Mosaic: Narrative
Mosaic: Quests
Mosaic Battles: a match-3 mechanic
Mosaic: Winning the Game
Mosaic: Increasing Difficulty
Level 1 challenges
Final Battle
Mosaic: Game Play
Mosaic: Win State
Mosaic: Audience Feedback so far
•It’s fun (7.5-10 out 10).
•The number of in-game rounds of match-3 need to be
reduced.
•...
Remaining Questions and Next Steps
Game players must learn what the game requires
in order to advance to a win.
How do I m...
Susan Edwards- Getty Trust
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Susan Edwards- Getty Trust

904 views

Published on

"Using Games to Engage Visitors”

A panel of museum education directors and consultants will explain how they have approached games for their institutions or clients, and what they've learned.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
904
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
27
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • COLOR: C 55 M 95 Y 7 K 15 Title: LTSyntax Bold 40pt Subtitle: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Content Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Section Divider Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt COLOR: Black unless needed Content: Linotype Syntax Regular 20pt Bullet Points: Linotype Syntax Regular 16pt Captions: Linotype Syntax Regular 12pt Footer Info / Photo Credit: Linotype Syntax Light 8pt
  • COLOR: C 55 M 95 Y 7 K 15 Title: LTSyntax Bold 40pt Subtitle: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Content Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Section Divider Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt COLOR: Black unless needed Content: Linotype Syntax Regular 20pt Bullet Points: Linotype Syntax Regular 16pt Captions: Linotype Syntax Regular 12pt Footer Info / Photo Credit: Linotype Syntax Light 8pt
  • COLOR: C 55 M 95 Y 7 K 15 Title: LTSyntax Bold 40pt Subtitle: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Content Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Section Divider Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt COLOR: Black unless needed Content: Linotype Syntax Regular 20pt Bullet Points: Linotype Syntax Regular 16pt Captions: Linotype Syntax Regular 12pt Footer Info / Photo Credit: Linotype Syntax Light 8pt
  • COLOR: C 55 M 95 Y 7 K 15 Title: LTSyntax Bold 40pt Subtitle: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Content Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt Section Divider Titles: LTSyntax Bold 28pt COLOR: Black unless needed Content: Linotype Syntax Regular 20pt Bullet Points: Linotype Syntax Regular 16pt Captions: Linotype Syntax Regular 12pt Footer Info / Photo Credit: Linotype Syntax Light 8pt
  • Susan Edwards- Getty Trust

    1. 1. The Museum as Game Space: Creating educational games for museum galleries
    2. 2. Why I Love Serious Games 2008: Fascinating! 1981: Not fascinating…
    3. 3. The Getty Villa
    4. 4. Digital Museum Gallery Games
    5. 5. Mystery @ the Museum Boston Museum of Science (2003) Played by parent and child teams with a Pocket PC and a walkie-talkie
    6. 6. Ghosts of a Chance Smithsonian American Art Museum (2008- 2010)
    7. 7. Murder at the Met The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2012)
    8. 8. Maryland Science Center PlanetMania (2013)
    9. 9. Capture the Museum National Gallery of Scotland (2013)
    10. 10. The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center Switch – Phases I & II (2012 & 2013)
    11. 11. Games at the Getty Villa
    12. 12. Creating a Game for the Getty Villa Phase I – Paper Prototype (2010)
    13. 13. Phases II & III – Partnering with the Rochester Institute of Technology Design Document iPod Prototype
    14. 14. Mosaic: Narrative
    15. 15. Mosaic: Quests
    16. 16. Mosaic Battles: a match-3 mechanic
    17. 17. Mosaic: Winning the Game
    18. 18. Mosaic: Increasing Difficulty Level 1 challenges Final Battle
    19. 19. Mosaic: Game Play
    20. 20. Mosaic: Win State
    21. 21. Mosaic: Audience Feedback so far •It’s fun (7.5-10 out 10). •The number of in-game rounds of match-3 need to be reduced. •How the game moves you through the museum needs to be rethought. •Scavenger hunt aspect gets high ratings from players. •People don’t explore buttons for information (Help) or game play (Change ability). •The map needs some work. •People read and enjoy the narrative. •Some players pay attention to works of art while playing, others don’t – the game does not require looking at the works of art.
    22. 22. Remaining Questions and Next Steps Game players must learn what the game requires in order to advance to a win. How do I make the content I want to teach: •Close looking at works of art •Information about how ancient works of art were made and used function as what the player must learn to win the game – and keep the game engaging at the same time?

    ×