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Leanna Prater - Can You Create A Game?: Rethinking Student Assessment

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Presenter: Leanna Prater, District Technology Resource Teacher, Fayette County Public Schools

The Can You Create a Game Challenge is a framework to help educators bridge the gap between a student’s need to play, create and explore new digital tools while addressing state mandated standards for assessment. When carefully written, the Can You Create a Game Challenge uses a combination of game development/ designer constraints, player goals, narrative structures of a game and a student plan sheet for teachers to intentionally plan for and assess specific learning targets within student created digital games. In addition, students demonstrate understanding of skills, content knowledge, computation thinking, problem solving and creativity. Recent results of teacher creation and use of Can You Create a Game Challenge, the framework and classroom applications will be shared, as well as the 5E inquiry based instructional design model which can be use with existing games in the classroom.

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Leanna Prater - Can You Create A Game?: Rethinking Student Assessment

  1. 1. Leanna Prater Fayette County Public Schools Lexington, KY
  2. 2. Our Students
  3. 3. Occupational Activities of Children Playing Thinking Learning Seymour Papert Papert, S. (1980). Teaching children thinking. In R. Taylor (Ed.), The computer in school: Tutor, tool, tutee (pp. 161-176). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  4. 4. 21st Century Skills Needed • think critically • solve problems creatively • innovate • collaborate • communicate Computational Thinking is a skill everyone needs for life and work in the digital age
  5. 5. • A Story, characters, setting • Player Goals • Problems to solve • Scaffolds • Score • Animation • Rewards • Ability to keeping trying • Play with a friend or a team
  6. 6. • A Story, characters, setting • Player Goals • Problems to solve • Scaffolds • Interactive • Score • Animation • Rewards • Ability to keeping trying • Play with a friend or a team Narrative Writing Calculating Create or Build a Model Performance
  7. 7. Previous Work: Children as Game Designers Yasmin Kafai Idit Harel
  8. 8. Design Needed to Be…. • Replicable • Fit within time constraints • Cross –curricular • Closely tied to standards • Sustainable
  9. 9. Framework: Based on Theory Constructivism Piaget Constructionism Papert Social Constructivism Vygotsky
  10. 10. Create a Challenge Using Substitution Model Assess standard with extended response Assess standard by asking students to calculate a math problem Assess standard by asking students to create a model Games have narrative structure, characters, setting, plots Games have score Characters move Games could involve a digital model that is interactive, player goal
  11. 11. Constraints Brainstorm and Planning Testing and Debugging (real audience) Reflection
  12. 12. CAN YOU CREATE A SCRATCH GAME? Can you make a game with the following conditions? • Correctly use a geosphere and a hydrosphere. • Explain with words or pictures how the geosphere and hydrosphere interact. • Have at least one background change • Character must move within the program • Player can interact with the game. 5-ESS2-1 Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.
  13. 13. Brainstorm your game or story: • Think about the systems you will use. • Select backgrounds and sprites to match your systems. • How will players interact with your program? • What is the goal of the game?
  14. 14. Create your program on the computer. • Test it out, does it work? • Have a friend play. Did it work for them? If not, why? • Go back and fix your program and try again.
  15. 15. Think: How could you have improved your game?
  16. 16. The Process
  17. 17. Authentic Instruction • Task – Student Centered, real-world relevant • Process- Sustained investigation, multiple interpretation/outcomes • Environment- Learning takes place in collaborative groups, over time • Teacher - coach/facilitator • Product - designed for a real audience • Assessment- authentic, integrated, leads to life- long learning. Callison & Lamb, 2004; Herrington, Oliver, & Reeves, 2003; Lombardi, 2007; Maina, 2004; Renzulli, Gentry, & Reis, 2004; Means & Olson, 1994
  18. 18. Total time with students: 50-55 minute class period 30-35 days a year 3 elementary STEM lab teachers 3 suburban elementary schools
  19. 19. • Various Access to Technology • Teachers reported all students came with some game play experience Diverse Student Populations School 1: Houses Deaf/Hard Hearing Cluster School 2: over 30 different nationalities, 16% ESL School 3: 67% students receive free/reduced lunch
  20. 20. Instructional Design http://www.bscs.org/bscs-5e-instructional-modelBiological Sciences Curriculum Study
  21. 21. The Work
  22. 22. Examples
  23. 23. Assessment
  24. 24. Assessment of Learning Targets Score 0 = No Evidence 1 = some evidence 2 = strong evidenceName:___________________________ Date of Target Check_______ NOTES Did the student correctly write decimals to the thousandths place? 0 1 2 Did the student correctly use the “>” symbol to compare decimals to the thousandths place? 0 1 2 Did the student correctly use the “<” symbol to compare decimals to the thousandths place? 0 1 2 Did the student correctly use the “=” symbol to compare decimals to the thousandths place? 0 1 2 Did the student correctly read the decimals in the game they created? 0 1 2 Assessment of Game Design Player could not win game by simply guessing 0 1 2 Game incorporated “>“, “<“, and “=“ symbols 0 1 2 Goals and rules of the game were clear 0 1 2 Graphics were appealing and added to the game 0 1 2 Information in the game was accurate 0 1 2 A peer successfully played the game 0 1 2
  25. 25. Project Rubric Scale: 0 = not attempted 1= attempted 2= met requirements 3= exceeds requirements Requirements Points Earned Use a control to begin the game Use a code to create a secret word Create a code to allow a player to hear each letter in your secret word or phrase Use “Ask and Answer” to make the game interactive with a player. Total Points
  26. 26. What We’re Learning
  27. 27. Leveling the Playing Field for Kids
  28. 28. Playtesting is important.
  29. 29. Many kids felt like a “game designer”. “Game designers mess up sometimes, and I messed up a couple of times.” “It was our idea completely. So we made it the way we wanted to.” “I was making something I could play.” “I did feel like a game designer in a way because you got to make lots of choices on how you wanted it to be.”
  30. 30. Those who didn’t…... “Game designers make games for years.” “It is not going to get popular or heard of.” “Felt like regular 4th grade.” “It was an assignment, not a choice.”
  31. 31. Shared Knowledge.
  32. 32. Role of the teacher
  33. 33. Developing Computational Thinking Skills, Vocabulary and Content
  34. 34. Teacher needs for new technologies, including game based learning.
  35. 35. Intellectual Partnerships “I’ve never felt more valued as an educator.”
  36. 36. Building a Community
  37. 37. New York, NY Cambridge, MA
  38. 38. Resources Blogs.fcps.net/createagame Leanna Prater Fayette County Schools Dr. Joan Mazur University of KY

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