futurebysemcon#32013
“Thefeelingof
goingreallyfast
isaddictive”
ANN-CHARLOTTE EKLUND
AFTER
WORK
name Ann-Charlotte Eklund....
2 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
CONTENTS #3.2013ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE OF FUTURE BY SEMCON
36Thekeytoupdatedmanuals
WhenAssaAblo...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 3
32MEETSEMCON’S
SHARPESTMINDS
InSemconBrainsyoucanmeetDaniel
Carlsson,whoensuresthateverything
fr...
4 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
PEOPLE #3.2013PEOPLE IN THIS ISSUE OF FUTURE BY SEMCON
All industries need to take action to dea...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 5
andersbjörklund,headof
medicaldevices,semcon
What isthebiggest challengefacing
medicaldevices?
“...
AGOLDEN
OPPORTUNITY
Theworld’spopulation
isagingandthesechanges
arehappeningveryquickly.This
meansmajorchallengesforthose
whowanttosucceedinth...
FOCUS:
THE AGING CONSUMER
The overhead lighting in the supermarket
shines brightly.There is plenty of seating in
the aisle...
WITHIN 40 years, there will
be over two billion
people over 60. This will be over one-fifth of
the total population of mor...
medicines are among the reasons. But the
cost of medical care, elderly care and pensions
will increase exponentially. As m...
existence of many more older people and the
fact that this will cost society a lot of money.
Many people are wondering how...
similar product that the customer already
has, and then progressively increase knowl-
edge of the new product, but relativ...
turn the cap to open them. This isn’t easy for
someone with arthritis or rheumatism. Many
companies today aren’t thinking ...
“We are working on a lot of things that I
can’t talk about in detail. But the aging con-
sumer will have a significant imp...
of the biggest challenges for companies.”
Others who need to increase the pace of
development are major organizations in b...
is surprised that none of the major companies
have tried to get to grips with the growing
market in the area where care fo...
mental philosophy that works. This in-
cludes everything from their clean and bright
homepage to how they design their sto...
as long as 300 years, but this is so far ahead
that it is difficult to truly grasp. But there
are consequences. The compan...
“I can name many more companies, such
as Walgreens in the US and Alliance Boots
in the UK. L’Oreal is also a company inves...
THE SOLUTIONHOW SEMCON SOLVED THE CUSTOMER’S PROBLEM
ASSIGNMENT: Elos Fixturlaser gave Semcon an assignment
to develop the...
CLARITY
Clearlymarkedmovingand
stationarylaserdevices
reduce theriskoferrorwhen
connecting thesystem.
QUICK START
Themeasu...
Powercell’sPowerpack
isinhere.
22 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
AndreasBodén
Development manager,
Powercell
Robert Eliasson
Acco...
Fuelcellsforgreenelectricityaremovingfromthelabto
everydaylifeatafastpace.Powercellisoneoftheplayers
drivingthisdevelopmen...
Statoil’sTrollAplatformintheNorthSea
supplieslargepartsofEuropewithenergy.But
toworkitneedsitsownpowersupply,ajob
whereSem...
I
n the middle of the North Sea, among
waves and icy winds, stands the Troll
A oil platform, ultimate proof that
man has s...
links were chosen. ABB thus received a new
order from Statoil worth about 270 mil-
lion US dollars, which comprises two ne...
BREADMAKER
OBH NORDICA INOX 6544
“It’s fun to bake bread properly,but
when you don’t have much time a
breadmaker is a grea...
28 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
Q&A KATHERINE KUCHENBECKER
HAPTICS EXPERT
Today, with the help of technology,
we can now see an...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 29
Katherine Kuchenbecker
Position:Associate Professor
of Mechanical
Engineering and Applied Mecha...
30 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
a surgeon and works with his hands every day
to try to save people’s lives, and my moth-
er is ...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 31
human hand would feel. Our haptic record-
ing device can measure exactly how much
force you’re ...
32 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
TEXT JOHANNA LAGERFORS & JOHAN JARNEVING
PHOTOS MIKAEL GÖTHAGE, ANDERS DEROS & ISTVAN LABADY
SE...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.20103 33FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 33
BEHINDTHESCENES
WITHSEMCONBRAINS
Want toknowmoreabout Daniel,his
wor...
34 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
“I WENT INTO embeddedsystemsbe-
causeI thinkit’smorefun toworkona
combinationofhardwareandsoftw...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.20103 35FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 35
IT’S EASY TO tell that ZsófiaDalihasfound the
right career.Sheisdriv...
36 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
Eightlanguages,sevensubsidiariesindifferent
countriesandaproductwhichadministerstensof
thousand...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 37

JohanHäggbom
Project Manager,ASSAABLOY
SharedTechnologies.
PetterDahlman
InformationEngineer,...
38 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
T
he cliq locking system developed
by Assa Abloy consists of, among
other things, an electronic...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 39
appealed to the development unit Assa Abloy
Shared Technologies to find a central solu-
tion. S...
40 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
About: Kentucky
Kentucky is an information management
system developed by Semcon.The system
is ...
The Sonic Movement reimagines what
vehicles could sound like. The project is a
result of close-knit collaboration between
...
42 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
SEMCON UPDATEWHAT’S HAPPENING IN SEMCON’S WORLD
THE BANGALORE OFFICE hasrecentlyrunapro-
ject w...
FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 43
SemconexpandsinnorthernSweden
WhenSemcon’sLuleåofficeopened,it becameSemcon’snorthernmost opera...
futurebysemcon#32013
“Thefeelingof
goingreallyfast
isaddictive”
ANN-CHARLOTTE EKLUND
AFTER
WORK
name Ann-Charlotte Eklund....
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The Aging Consumer - Future by Semcon # 3 2013

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The Aging Consumer - Future by Semcon # 3 2013

  1. 1. futurebysemcon#32013 “Thefeelingof goingreallyfast isaddictive” ANN-CHARLOTTE EKLUND AFTER WORK name Ann-Charlotte Eklund. at work Project Manager in the pharmaceutical and medical technology industry. after work Roller derby training. current challengeTo get better at tackling harder! TEXT:MAGNUSCARLSSONPHOTO:MATTIASBARDÅ About me “I work a lot and spend a lot of my free time playing roller derby.Both training and getting involved in the voluntary aspect of the association.I’m 31 and live in Södermalm in Stockholm.” About my job “I work as a project management consultant at a large pharmaceutical company.There I manage investment projects within tablet manufacture.I have been at Sem- con since 2009 and am very happy in what I do.” About roller derby “About a year ago a friend told me that she had joined a roller derby team.It’s a full contact sport on roller skates,and it’s just girls playing.I follo- wed along and gave it a try and became hooked and bought skates from a girl there immedia- tely.The adrenaline rush,the game and the feeling of going really fast is addictive.” What I’ve learnt from roller derby “For me,roller derby has been a great way to switch off from my job - a good complement to the daily grind at work.I also benefit at work from meeting many different kinds of people at roller derby.And as I’m a project manager at work,I think it’s inte- resting to go in and see how projects are run in an association where everyone works as a volunteer.There are many similarities with my job but at the same time it’s completely different.” ABOUT: ROLLER DERBY Roller derby is a full-contact sport played on old-fashioned roller skates.The sport develo- ped in the USA in the 1920s and in recent years has spread as an underground movement to many countries over the world. Roller derby is based on five players on each team on an oval indoor track trying to win points through one player,the “jammer”,trying to run around the opposition,called“blockers”. + HOWKATHERINE KUCHENBECKERWANTS TOFOOLOURSENSES POWERPAC –AREVOLUTION INFUELCELLS KENTUCKYMAKES ASSAABLOY’SELECTRONIC KEYSCHEAPER A MAGAZINE ABOUT THE ART OF CREATING THE FUTURE #3 2013 THE GOLDEN YEARS TOMORROW’S 60-YEAR-OLDS WILL BE STRONGER BOTH PHYSICALLY AND FINANCIALLY. HOW DOES THIS AFFECT SOCIETY – AND HOW CAN WE PREPARE?
  2. 2. 2 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 CONTENTS #3.2013ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE OF FUTURE BY SEMCON 36Thekeytoupdatedmanuals WhenAssaAbloywasstreamliningitsmanualsfortheir electroniclocks,theychosetoworkwithSemcon,whose proprietarysoftwaresavesbothtimeandmoney.
  3. 3. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 3 32MEETSEMCON’S SHARPESTMINDS InSemconBrainsyoucanmeetDaniel Carlsson,whoensuresthateverything fromplasterstopacemakerswork properly,PederAlm,aspecialistin embeddedsystems,andZsófiaDali, whoworksine-learning. 16ASAFERFUTURE WITHHANDGESTURES Usinggestureshasbecomeanatural waytocontrolourmobiles.Semcon investigateshowwecanusegesturesto controlthingssuchasperipheralsin acar. Website: www.semcon.com Letters: Future by Semcon, Semcon AB, 417 80 Göteborg, Sweden. Change of address: future@semcon.com Publisher: Anders Atterling. Tel: +46 (0)70-447 28 19, email: anders.atterling@semcon.com Semcon project manager: Madeleine Andersson. Tel: +46 (0)76-569 83 31, e-mail: madeleine.andersson@semcon.com Editorial production: Spoon, spoon.se. Editor: Björn Jansson. Designer: Mathias Lövström. Repro: Spoon. Printing: Trydells Tryckeri, Laholm. Translation: Cannon Språkkonsult AB. ISSN: 1650-9072. EDITORIAL Preparing for the future 24SEMCONMAKING ENERGYSUPPLYSAFER WhenABBinLudvikabuildspower supplysystemsforoilrigstheyask Semconforhelp.ConsultantLennie Edman-Terningisinchargeoftestingof thecontrolsystems. 28INTRODUCINGTOUCH TOTHECOMPUTERWORLD KatherineKuchenbeckerisoneofthemain researchfiguresinhaptictechnology-a technologythatfeedsbacktooursenseof touch,andcanmakeusbelievethatweare feelingthingsthatdon’texist. MARKUS GRANLUND, CEO,SEMCON W ithin 40 years, the structure of the earth’s population will be quite different from how it looks today. The older people of the community will be more numerous, healthi- er and financially stronger. When there is such a fundamental change in society, we have to keep up with the technological developments which follow. In this edition of Future by Semcon we go in-depth with the latest population projec- tions and analyze what the effect may be - for us, for the world and its people in general. With this knowledge, we will be well-prepared in a future that we are ourselves creating. We also visit Osstell, a company that ensures dental implants succeed to a greater extent thanks to a world-leading measuring technique. In this issue, we also visit Assa Abloy and talk about how we are helping them streamline their operations. We also get a glimpse of how the fuel cells of the future are evolving and learn more about how testing works so as not to en- counter any surprises when a whole oil platform has to be supplied with energy. Haptic researcher Katherine Kuchenbecker talks about how in the future we will be able to touch and interact with things that are not there. As usual, we also meet some of Sem- con’s experts, who offer a glimpse into how they create products and solutions for the future. 1
  4. 4. 4 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 PEOPLE #3.2013PEOPLE IN THIS ISSUE OF FUTURE BY SEMCON All industries need to take action to deal with – and benefit from – the changing population structure. Here’s what some of the people involved in this issue of the Future by Semcon are saying. katherinekuchenbecker,associateprofessorof mechanicalengineeringandappliedmechanicsand computerandinformationscienceattheuniversityof pennsylvania What significancecanhapticshavefortheelderly? “Thebiggest area,I think,isphysical therapyandrehabilitation-forexampleusingMi- crosoft Kinect 360.Inmylaboratorywehavestudiedcost-effectivesolutionsfor tactile feedback,whichisadministeredin thearmoranyotherbodypart inneedofrehabili- tation.It couldhelppatientsregainabetterfeelingofcoordinationafterastroke.” danielcarlsson,seniorqualityandproject manager,semcon Whichproductsdoyouthinkwillappearandwhichwilldisappear within40years? “Thewheelchairwilldisappear.Inafewdecades’time,Ibelieve therewill besolutionsallowinganyone towalk.Whenit comes tonewproducts, I’mhopefulabout artificialeyes.Visionis theability tohandlelarge amountsofdata.Therearealready tools that allowanyone tohear,andI think that ouraimshouldbe that everyoneshouldalsobeable tosee.” 34 PAGE 28 PAGE pederalm,teammanagerandproductdeveloper withinembeddedsystems,semcon Howcanembeddedsystemsbedesignedtoincludetheelderlyinabetterway? “I think theelderlycurrentlyfeel that theycan’t keepup- that theywillbe overtakenby technology.Societyhasundergonea technologicalrevolution,and therehasbeenagapformanypeopleover50 today.I think therewillbemore, similarchanges,and thechallengeis then toconsider theneedsof theolder generation,without compromisingon technicaldevelopment.” 32 PAGE
  5. 5. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 5 andersbjörklund,headof medicaldevices,semcon What isthebiggest challengefacing medicaldevices? “It’sacombinationofincreasedregu- latoryrequirements,focusoncareat homeandmore technologicalcontent inproducts.User-friendliness,software andappswhichwillbeintegratedinto orwithproducts.Thequestionofhow personalintegrityshouldbehandled andweighedupagainst healthbenefits isachallenge.” zsófiadali,technicalwriterande-learning consultant,semcon What doesthefutureofe-learninglooklike? “Likeanaturalpart ofeverydaylife.Technologyhas takenaquantum leapandwehave thelatest glasses,whichreadour thoughtsand project theinformationweneedonto thenearest surface.Education technologywilladapt to thesurroundingsandwewilllearn things everywhere.We’lljust have tolookaround.It’llbesuper-cool!” anderspetersson,operationalmanager,osstell What rolewilltechnologyplayinourdentalhealthin2050? “Teethweardownanddonot re-formlikeother tissues.Aslifeexpectan- cyincreases,sodoes thedemandfor teeth-anddentalimplants-which last.Treatment methodswillbequickerandsafer.Innearly40years’ time,most peoplewillbeable toreceivestableimplantsandgohome andeat immediatelyaftersurgery.Technologywillmake treatment more preciseandlifeeasierforboth thepatient and thedentist.” 12 PAGE 10 PAGE 35 PAGE
  6. 6. AGOLDEN OPPORTUNITY
  7. 7. Theworld’spopulation isagingandthesechanges arehappeningveryquickly.This meansmajorchallengesforthose whowanttosucceedinthefuture. Thekeyisinadaptingproducts fortheover-60s–butwithout makingitsoobviousthatother customersarescaredoff. TEXT MARCUS OLSSON
  8. 8. FOCUS: THE AGING CONSUMER The overhead lighting in the supermarket shines brightly.There is plenty of seating in the aisles and all the goods on the shelves are at our fingertips.No customer needs to stretch to reach anything.There is no music being played: there is a slow tempo and a quiet atmosphere in the store.The staff take time,speak slowly and inform customers in a friendly and simple manner.If there is no-one nearby,it’s easy to follow the clear signs.The year is 2050,and the world and its societies have changed. 8 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  9. 9. WITHIN 40 years, there will be over two billion people over 60. This will be over one-fifth of the total population of more than nine billion. This group of people is growing five times quicker than the rest of the population. Now - in the 2050s - they are also even healthier and stronger, both physically and financially. These changes will have an impact on every industry on the planet. “The interesting thing will be in seeing how demographic changes reshape the business landscape and pretty much every custom- er market, from retail to the production and development of customer products,”says Ajit Kambil. He is head of global research at Deloitte, a multinational auditing firm, and works with many of the world’s largest companies. Kam- bil was behind the research report‘Wealth with Wisdom: Serving the Needs of Aging Consumers,’a demographic study of the aging consumer. Thousands of people were inter- viewed for the report. “We note that the world has never expe- rienced such a large demographic change in such a short time. We looked at the numbers and research from economic, psychological, biological and social perspectives,”says Kam- bil, at Deloitte’s headquarters. He continues: “In the past you didn’t have to think so much about the older part of the population. They didn’t live as long. Neither were their lives as independent. Many of the needs of my grandparents were looked after by their im- mediate family. If I look at myself, I’ll probably live more independently when I’m older than they did during the last part of their lives.” In 2050, there will be more people over 60 than there will be young people under 16, according to a UN report. This has never happened before in history. A reduced birth rate in many countries and better food and Populationgrowth Worldpopulationin2013:7.2billion Estimatedpopulationin2050:9.6billion SOURCE: UN PHOTO: 123RF FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 9
  10. 10. medicines are among the reasons. But the cost of medical care, elderly care and pensions will increase exponentially. As more people continue working for longer, it will be more difficult for young people to enter the labour market. This also means lower tax revenues. Dick Stroud has written a number of books about the aging consumer. His company 20plus30 Consulting helps companies market and sell products to the older generation. “Decision makers at every possible level and position in the community have to cre- ate awareness, whether they are politicians, officials or business leaders. When building or planning something, you have to have a particular type of end user in mind. However, those taking the decisions rarely think of the elderly, but instead about younger people.” THERE IS A gap between reality and how most organizations make their decisions. Many large organizations and authorities are several steps behind in this development, according to Stroud. “It’s not that they can’t read the bottom line - rather that they are wondering where to start. But the fact is that once an informed decision has been made, the path to the goal will be much simpler and straighter. Many things become more obvious. You just have to first get past the static friction and make things start moving.” Britt Östlund is professor of welfare tech- nology at Lund University. She advocates a new approach to older people. “There is a lot of discussion about the T hemedical technologymarket is growingsteadily.Demographic developmentsareleading toa genuinefocusonlifescienceingeneral andmedicaldevicesinparticular.The West nolongerhasanagepyramid,with alot ofyoungpeopleandfewoldpeople. Instead,therearealot ofpeopleaged between35and65.Therest of theworld isnowfollowing. “Ifyouareborninadeveloping country,youwilllargelysurvivediseases whichpreviouslycausedhighinfant mortalitysuchasmalaria. Instead,peo- plenowadayslive toanagewhenother diseasessuchascancerbecomemore common,requiringsignificantlymore, long-termcare,”saysAndersBjörklund. BjörklundisinchargeofallofSem- con’smedical technologyservices.This requiresaholisticapproach,combining experienceinindustrialdesignand Aquestionof lifeexpectancy andquality AndersBjörklundandhisexpertsatmed- icaldevicesletprovenindustrialdesign shapethefutureofmedicaldevices. TEXT JOHAN JARNEVING  PHOTO LARS ARDARVE TECHNOLOGY FOR AN AGING POPULATION FOCUS: THE AGING CONSUMER
  11. 11. existence of many more older people and the fact that this will cost society a lot of money. Many people are wondering how we will be able to solve all the future problems. This ap- proach is based on seeing an elderly person as a frail individual needing help with different things. Certainly, many people will need help, but one new aspect is that we will live longer and healthier lives - and more of us will live longer,”Östlund says, continuing: “The dominant approach toward the elderly today is a medical one - it is a downhill strug- gle, you fall ill and start to feel pain. Many don’t look at the person as a whole. Instead, you have to see the elderly as active individ- uals - even when they are ill or have disabil- ities.” Dick Stroud is focusing on how physiologi- cal changes affect the older consumer. “Companies today know little about how the physiology of the aging process affects the buyer. Frequently, no thought is given to marketing, presenting, selling and supporting products for older people. Impaired vision, hearing, feel and ability to learn affects how we act as consumers. The aspect which gets the least attention is the importance of the aging brain. By which I don’t mean the links to various diseases, but what happens to all of us over time. The vast majority of us are aware that eyesight deteriorates with age, but certain companies just think: ’well then, we’ll have to use a larger font on our website.’“ AJIT KAMBIL AT Deloitte thinks similarly. “One thing may be to remove distracting stimuli. What we found in our research was that many environments - such as shopping - are too loud. Many consumers don’t like it, but music is still played in most shops and shopping malls. What companies and stores do not realize is that this particularly dis- tracts the elderly from doing what they came there to do - buy things.” In the future, retail itself will be complete- ly changed, thinks Kambil. It is important to consider how to teach the customer about a product’s features and functionality. “You have act more slowly than with a younger customer. It’s best to start with a engineeringwithknowledgeof theregu- lationswithin theindustry. “Medical device is in a class of its own with its specific legal requirements and we are a valuable guide to our customers.Internationally,it’s a real jungle with different rules and quality systems,even if the EU and the US are quite similar.Complexity is also a contributing factor in more companies outsourcing development work to ex- ternal experts.” WITH MEDICAL ADVANCES, weareget- tingolder,but wealsoneedmorecare. Non-infectiousdiseasessuchasAlzheim- er’s,canceranddiabetesaffect morepeo- ple:80%ofuswilldiefrom thesekind ofdiseases.Meanwhile,healthcareand aidsareimprovingso that morepeople canbothsurviveandliveaworthwhile lifewith thesediseases. “The trendwithinmedicaldevicesis towardsdesignanduser-friendliness. Asweget older,wemayfindit difficult tomovebut willstillbeable tocope.You canusesuchaidsafterastroke,but can alsogoaround townwithout needing to go tohospital.” THE OTHER CLEAR trendiswithin theop- portunities that ITprovides.Wearejust at thestart of theconnectedsociety. “We’realready talkingabout proto- typeswhichwillmakeaquickdiagnosis everymorningandget anindicationof someone’sgeneralcondition.Theprod- uctslookmorelikeasmartphonewith a touchscreenanddifferent appsrather thananold-fashionedbloodpressure monitor.Sinceweworkwithotherindus- tries,suchasautomotiveandenergy,we cancross-pollinateknowledgeandlearn acrossborders.” Using thesamelogicaswith thedevel- opment ofcomputers,when technology advancesproductsbecomesmallerand smarter.Electronicsandsoftwarecanbe integratedintoother typesofmedical device. “Itwon’tbelongbeforewe’remonitor- ingandreportingoursymptomsonline throughapps,smartphonesandother technologicalsolutions,”saysBjörklund1 THEEXPERT AndersBjörklund Title: Head of Medical Devices at Semcon. Lifeexpectancy isincreasing According to theUNreport“World PopulationProspects:The2012Revision”, averagelifeexpectancyworldwidewill risefrom thecurrent 70years to76years byaround2050.By2100,it maybeas highas82years,andinmoredeveloped countries89. SOURCE: UN MULTI-FUNCTIONAL WHEELCHAIR Semconwashiredby thecompanyEtac todevelopaman- ufacturingset-upforawheelchairaimedat theover-70s. Etac’skeywordswere“warmandhuman.” Theresult isaproduct withfewercomponentsandmore multi-functionalfeatures.Thewheelchairusesmanypartscast inaluminium,givingalighterframeandamoreenergy-and cost-effectivemanufacturingprocess. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 11
  12. 12. similar product that the customer already has, and then progressively increase knowl- edge of the new product, but relatively slowly. Vendors of the future will need to spend more time on individual customers.” The 60-year-olds of 2050 were born in 1990.They will be more used to technology than elderly people are today. However, both Stroud and Kambil see prob- lems in how today’s product developers work when developing new products and services. Currently, it is the elderly who are forced to adapt to the products - and not vice versa. “A great number of things we have around us are anything but user-friendly,”says Kam- bil.”Just look at the different types of med- ication bottles. You have to press down and A titaniumscrewwhichgoesinto thejawboneinorder tokeepan artificialcrowninplace.When ProfessorPer-IngvarBrånemarkdevel- oped thismethod-osseointegration-in the1960s,tomanypeopleit must have seemedlikesciencefiction.Nowit is commonplaceinmost partsof theworld and theimplant isimprovingqualityof lifefor thousandsofpeople.Anddevelop- ment iscontinuing. Amajorstep tosimplify the treatment andincreaseprecisionwas takenin the early2000s.Themedical technology companyOsstell thenstarteddeveloping ameasuringinstrument tocheck the stabilityof the titaniumscrew. “What wecallaSmartpegisattached to theimplant and thensends themeas- uringinstrument anelectromagnetic pulseandmeasures theoscillations(fre- quency).We thenconvert it toourown Tactiledesign forsaferdental implants Adentalimplantwhichfitsperfectlyfrom thestartimprovesapatient’squalityoflife andgivesthedentistabetteropportunity toevaluatehis/herwork.Osstell’sworld- leadingmeasuringinstrumentensures thatmoreimplantsaresuccessful. TEXT JOHAN JARNEVING  PHOTO LARS ARDARVE scale,ISQ(Implant StabilityQuotient), where100isrocksolidand1iscomplete- lyloose.Thisinformationiscrucial to obtainanobjectiveviewof theimplant’s ability tobearloads,”saysAndersPeters- son,COOandco-founderofOsstell. The technologyisextremelyadvanced andhasascientificbasis.Now themajor challengeforOsstellis toreachout to moreof theworld’sdentists. “Worldwide,around170000den- tistsworkwithimplants.Out of these, perhaps100000workregularlywith the technology.Thiscompared to the 10000instrumentswehavesoldsince launch.Westillhavealot ofdentists to convince,”saysPetersson. IN DECEMBER 2012, theKoreanimplant manufacturerMegaGenhadaproposal forOsstell:Canyoudevelopaunique designofyourinstrument forus?Could it befinishedby thesummer? Osstelland theimplant industryhave interestsincommon,soOsstell’sman- agement immediatelysaw thepotential of theproject.Collaborationisanatural wayofincreasingawarenessofOsstell’s technology.AndersPeterssongot Sem- coninvolvedandsoon thefirst concept proposalwasdevelopedand theproject wasinfullswing. “Withaschedulewhichwasbothclear anddemanding,workingmethodically becameevenmoreimportantforus.We approachedthegoalstep-by-step.From conceptandprototypestodesign,testing andproduction.Nowwe’vedoneit.Large- lythankstotheextensiveexperienceof theteamandearlydialoguewithsuppli- ers.Theclosecollaborationbetweenus andOsstellshouldn’tbeunderestimated,” saysJeffSmith,Semconprojectmanager. FOR UNDERSTANDABLE REASONS, therearegreat demandsondocumen- tationandriskanalysiswithmedical devices.Withadedicatedqualityengi- neerin theworkinggroup,Semconcould incorporate thisworkinto therapidprod- uct development.Theresult isextensive documentationwhichOsstellcanutilize infutureprojects. DENTAL HEALTH This was the result when Semcon redesigned Osstell’s world-leading instrument. COMFORTABLE KITCHEN APPLIANCES Semconhasbeeninvolvedinproducinganumberofproductsfor Ikea’s365series.Theseincludeaballoonwhiskandaspatula, bothusingeasy-to-gripmaterialsanddesign.Anaging generationhasbeen takenintoaccount - theutensils shouldbeaseasy tousefora15-year-oldasfora70-year- old.Theedgeof thehandleof theballoonwhiskalso means that it islesslikely toslipdownin thepan and thespatulacomeswithanextra-widebase whichmakesit easier tofryfoodsuchasfishor pancakes. FOCUS: THE AGING CONSUMER 12 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  13. 13. turn the cap to open them. This isn’t easy for someone with arthritis or rheumatism. Many companies today aren’t thinking of 80- or 90-year-olds when designing new products, but some are increasingly seeing this category as a potential market. Dick Stroud: “I live in London and some time ago visited one of its finest hotels, which had just under- gone a complete renovation. It was obvious that no one had considered that future guests would be older. It wouldn’t have cost more to do it the right way from the start, i.e. more suitable for older customers. It’s small things such as seats being too high, or bad overhead lighting. People of all ages have to squint at the menu’s small lettering when ordering something to eat. In other words, it’s not just about designing for older people, but for any- one who can benefit from it.” Ajit Kambil takes the travel industry as another example. “I travel a lot myself for work and every time I’m on an aeroplane I think the same thing. All of the luggage hatches are above head height. Lifting heavy bags up high is quite difficult for many older people.” BACK TO THE FUTURE. In 2050, there will be more models of car, with increased options and roomier interiors. Carl Wellborn is a project manager and en- gineer at General Motors’R&D department. Besides theextensiveformalrequire- ments,therewereacoupleofclear tech- nicalrequirements.Theproduct had to haveachargingstationandcertaincon- nectivity.Otherwise,Semcon’sdesigners andengineershadafreehand. Thedesignconcept isalsobasedona naturalorganicshapewhichfitscom- fortablyin thehand.Thesmoothdisplay doesn’t just giveaspotlessimpression: it isalsoahygienicfeature that makesit easier towipe thedevice. TITANIUM IMPLANTS MAY haveseemed futuristicwhen theywereintroducedin the1960s,but will theybeneededat all in the2060s?By that time,toothdecay shouldbeeradicatedandeveryone’s teethshouldbeingoodcondition. “Well,weshouldn’t forget that there arelargedifferencesbetweencountries. InmanypartsofSouthAmerica,Asia andAfrica,bad teetharewidespread andit will takealong time to turn things around there,”saysPetersson. “Yes,andwearealsogettingolder,and withage theneedfordentalimplants increases,”saysSvensson. Theimplant market hasbeengrowing steadilysince the1960sand thereisno signofreduceddemandin thefuture. On thecontrary,withmoresophisticat- ed technologyandimprovedmethods, this treatment canbenefit morepeople, especiallyindevelopingcountries. Throughsimilarcollaborationsas that withMegaGen,Osstelliswellonits way tonewmarkets,moredentistsand ultimatelymoresatisfiedpatientswith stableimplants.1 AndersPetersson Operationalmanager andco-founder,Osstell JonasSvensson Project Manager, MedicalDevices, Semcon FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 13
  14. 14. “We are working on a lot of things that I can’t talk about in detail. But the aging con- sumer will have a significant impact on our work and the products and services we devel- op,”he says. “The biggest challenges are not actually technical but psychological. We have inter- viewed thousands of people and our results say that the thing most people are worried about is being less free. Having reduced ac- cess to services and products that they have used when younger - they fear that their lives will become less mobile.” This creates challenges for every car man- ufacturer. “Getting into and out of a car becomes more difficult when you are older. Most- ly because the user has changed physically, rather than cars being made differently today than previously. It’s mostly about a way of thinking. When you’re younger, you don’t even have to think about getting in and out. When you are older, your body reminds you. When we develop a model, we have to think about our customers to ensure that this does not become a problem. We are looking for solutions where aging does not inter- fere with the experience and use of the car. It should be just as easy to get in and out as always. Driving a car should be simple and flexible.” SMALL CHANGES MAKE a big difference. “We have already made it easier to get in and out of many of our models. One challenge is in maintaining the same high safety and crash tolerance as before. Another is that most peo- ple still do not want a car explicitly designed for the elderly or for people with physical disabilities. We are working to integrate those smart solutions which will make the car more accessible to older people, but without scaring away others who might be interested in it. It is about finding small smart features which won’t completely change the look and feel of the vehicle. There are solutions for those who really need them and will be helped by them. But everyone using the product will benefit from the improvements that have been made. It is about making cars that are more“ag- ing-friendly”- but without making this too obvious. Dick Stroud believes that one of the main tricks for capturing the aging consumer is to start early. There are fewer than 40 years left until 2050.Companies cannot afford to make mistakes. Stroud uses Heineken as an example. The brewer is trying to reach older customers by tailoring and marketing beers targeted at the ages of 60, 65, 70 and 75. “The paradox is that even if you need a product specifically designed for a 60 year old, you don’t want to buy it. I am 63 years old my- self and don’t want to be reminded that all my senses are impaired and that a company feels sorry for me because of it. This paradox is one P etterDahlqvist isaninteraction designerat Semcon.Inhiscurrent assignment,heisatVolvoTrucks, whereheworksonHMI-human-ma- chineinterface- theuserinterface that links theuser to theproduct.Petterbe- lieves that hisindustryisfacingamajor challengein thefuture,when theneeds ofanincreasinglyelderlyclientelehave tobemet. “Today’sproductsfor theelderlyoften havelargebuttons,ahighervolumeand aneasily-recognizableinterface.Theyare adaptedfordisabilitieswhichare typical in theelderly,suchasimpairedvisionand hearing,but alsofor thefact that the Elderlypeopleofthe futuremoreusedto technology As theworldpopulationdramaticallyin- creases–and thegroupofpeopleover60 is thefastest-growing–PetterDahlqvist believes that adaptingproductsforolder peoplewilllookradicallydifferent in the future. TEXT JOHANNA LAGERFORS  PHOTO LARS ARDARVE A CUSTOMIZED FUTURE UNIQUE HEARING AID OticonMedicalwanted todevelopauniquehearingaidwithout compromisingoneither toleranceorquality.Moreover,it had tobe user-friendlyandintuitive,andavailableinbothright-andleft-ear versions.Semconwashiredfordesignwork,surfacedesignand alsosomeplasticmodelling.Theresult was thePontoPro Power-anergonomicproduct whichalsohasanorganic feel.Compared to thecompetition,thePontoProPower isadesignrevolutionin themarket,andcannowboast tobeboth theworld’sfirst fullydigitalandprogram- mablebone-anchoredhearingaid,andhasbeen awarded theinternationaliFDesignAward. FOCUS: THE AGING CONSUMER 14 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  15. 15. of the biggest challenges for companies.” Others who need to increase the pace of development are major organizations in both public and private sectors. The medical in- dustry will grow exponentially because of the large increase in elderly people. Many insti- tutions are slow in introducing technological innovations within their businesses, in part because of the costs involved. “There are many tools just waiting to be de- ployed. If you visit a hospital in the UK today, much of the equipment is incredibly primitive compared to what is already on the market.” THE MODERN TECHNOLOGY used in each and every person’s home could be transformed from gaming and entertainment tools into as- sistive technology within care for the elderly and sick. “A lot of things are happening on the tech- nological side right now. There are devices which allow you to manage and control pro- grams on a screen just by using hand move- ments. For many older people, this is a very positive feature.” Dick Stroud thinks the focus is wrong and elderlyareless tech-savvy thanyounger users,”hesays. In thefuture,Petterbelieves that themarket willlookdifferent,not just because therewillbemoreandmore elderlypeople,but alsobecause their ability toembracenew technologywill bedifferent then. “Theoldergenerationsof thefuture willhaveacompletelydifferent experi- enceof technology than today’selderly. It willbenaturalfor them touse tech- nologyforahugevarietyofpurposesin everydaylife-not just forerrandsand obligations,”hesays. HMIhasgreat importance tohow user-friendlyaproduct is,andhowit is perceivedby thecustomer. “It’sfunworkingininteractiondesign becausewhat youdoissoimportant to theuserexperience.What wedois visible to theconsumer.” Todoagoodjobit is thereforeimpor- tant toknow the target audienceand theneeds that theyhave.Duringhis designengineering training,Dahlqvist wrotea thesisabout developinghospital equipment aimedat theelderlyand the disabled. “Theworkwasmoreaboutphysical ergonomicsthanHMI,but theseprelimi- narystudiesincreasedmyunderstanding ofolderusersandtheirneeds,”hesays. Ifthetechnologygapbetweenthe youngandtheolddecreasesinthefuture, itwillbeeasiertoproduceproductsfor wideraudiences.Thefoundationsofin- teractiondesign-suchassimplicity,clear structuresandrecognition-areimpor- tantnomatterwhatagetheusersare. “Weareallpeopleandactuallyhave afairlysimilarunderstandingand the sameneeds.However,toreduce the riskofscaringawayolderpeoplewitha complicatedproduct,oryoungerpeople withsomethingoverlysimple,in the futureyoucanimagineofferingsettings allowing theuser tocustomize theinter- face to thedesiredlevelofdifficulty,”says Dahlqvist 1 THESPECIALIST PetterDahlqvist Title: Interaction Designer,Semcon “THEPARADOXISTHATEVENIFYOUNEEDA PRODUCTSPECIFICALLYDESIGNEDFORA 60-YEAR-OLD,YOUDON’TWANTTOBUYIT.” Dick Stroud, business strategist FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 15
  16. 16. is surprised that none of the major companies have tried to get to grips with the growing market in the area where care for the elderly and sick meets modern technology. “A lot of energy is put into sexy technolo- gy and design rather than discovering tools to help the elderly. If you look at wheel- chairs, toilet seats and jars today, so much of the foundation of what is designed now is almost 50 years old. This is one thing that may change when the focus shifts to the older generation.” Few companies have so far taken future changes genuinely seriously. But there are exceptions. “Apple has succeeded. They were certainly not originally thinking of older people, but they succeed because they have a funda- G estureConcept is thecollec- tivenamefor thecompany’s researchandproduct develop- ment within thesector. “Wehavereceivedinquiriesfromcus- tomerswhowant toworkwithgestures, and thisisourconcept withwhichwe explainhowwesee thecapabilitiesand limitationsofgestures,”saysAnders Sundin.“It’sawayofdemonstrating the potentialof“inairgestures”andwhat it candoforadriver.Thiscaninclude Howgestureswill makeeveryday technologysimpler Gesture-controlledsystemswillbea commonfeatureofmanypeople’severy- daylives.Semcon’sworkonfuturesolu- tionsisextremelyadvanced. “Thepotentialfordevelopmentis enormous,”saysAndersSundin,headof HumanFactorsatSemcon. TEXT MARCUS OLSSON PHOTO SEMCON MOTION CONTROL reducing theriskofdrivingoff theroad. Youshouldn’t have tolookforabutton in thecarorfeelwithyourhand-you shouldbeable tomakeagesturealmost anywherein thecar.Thiswillreduce the riskofvisualdistraction.” GESTURES ARE UNLIKELY tocompletely replace thebuttonscommonin today’s cars. “No,not right now,anyway.Maybe in thelong-term.But it’sbest tohavea physicalback-upinmost cases.Certain basicfunctions that peopleareused to willremain.It’s themost natural thing touse theindicatorleverand thiswill probablystayandnot bereplacedbya wave.Thegestureswillbewhere theyare useful,not where theyhamper.” In-airgesturescancontrol thesmall simple things,suchasacupholderap- pearingwhenahandmotioninstructsit todoso,oracardooropeningautomat- icallywhen thedriverisinacertainposi- tionandgesticulatesinacertainway. Semcon’sGestureActionBased Infotainment (GABI)isaconcept for controlling theinfotainment system through“gestures”using the touch screenona tablet.It hasbeendeveloped throughresearchbySemconexpertsin interactiondesign. GABIactsasanoverlayinwhich the drivercancontrol themainfunctionsof thesystemwithout having tolookaway from theroad,nomatterwherein the systemyouare. “Themost commonfunctionscanbe operatedbysimplegestureswithout causingvisualdistraction.It canalso beusedbydifferent typesofdrivers. Anelderlydrivershouldn’t have to lookforfeaturesinseveralmenusand press things theyarenot used to.Not allelderlypeoplehaveasmart phone, either.Thereisoftenabarrierpreventing olderpeoplefromusingnew technology availableincars.Thisismoreofanarea foryoungerpeoplewhoalreadyconnect theirphonesand tabletsin thecar.” Semconhasexpertsinareassuchas ergonomics,interactivedesign,acoustics andcognitivescience.Theyrealise that gestureshavehugepotentialin the future.In thecarsof thefuture,muchof thiswillbestandard. “Thisimprovessafety.That’s the most important thing.It’salsoaunique sellingpoint.Thisissomethingwhich improves theexperienceandcouldlead toincreasedsales.Theuserexperienceis what willdeterminewhetheryoubuya carornot in thefuture.Gesturesareone aspect whichwillmakeit feelcomforta- bleandenjoyable tobuyanewcar.” In thefuture,reactions tostressor SELECTA TheFerraracoffeemachinereceivedattentionat several tradeshowsandhadfavourablereviews.Semconwashired forafeasibilitystudy,designworkand technicalsupport - thegoalwas that thecoffeemachineshouldbeusedby everyone-youngandold.Furthermore,it had toadapt todifferent customerneeds.It isacoffeemachinewitha dualbrewerwhichbrewsbothwithandwithout pressure so that theusercanchooseanythingfrom traditional Swedishfreshlybrewedcoffee(without pres- sure) toaperfect espresso(with pressure). FOCUS: THE AGING CONSUMER 16 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  17. 17. mental philosophy that works. This in- cludes everything from their clean and bright homepage to how they design their stores, showcase their products and, finally, to how user-friendly their products are. They think about the whole customer experience. If you optimize the customer experience, you will also be able to reach the older consumer. AT KEARNEY IS a global management consultan- cy firm. They have also carried out studies on the aging consumer, and have found a number of successful examples. Mike Moriarty is one of the partners and also co-author of the re- port“Understanding the Needs and Conse- quences of The Ageing Consumer”. “We may live productive lives until we are over 100. Some research says that we may live dangercouldbeused todevelopfuture safetysystemsincars.Sensorswillbe able toreadbodylanguage,sudden movementsandevenfacialexpressions. “Igenuinelybelievein theseactive safetysystems,whereyoucancapture theintent of thedriver.Youhelp thecar toact,”saysSundin. Forexample,ifyouhave tostop suddenly thesystemwillquicklydetect thesuddenmovement ofyourfoot to thebrake,or that youhaveresponded inaway that youwouldn’t normally otherwise. BUT THERE ARE Challenges.Newfea- turesincarsmustn’t becomeasourceof distraction,saysSundin.Thedriver’sfirst priorityis todrive thecarsafely. “Youshouldn’t beallowed toinfluence thecarundulywithagesture-ifyou scratchyourear,forexample.Controlling unintentionalgesturesisachallenge. Anotherislearning thegestures,es- peciallyif theyarealot of them.It will always takeacertainamount of time to learn- that’sprobablyinevitable.Soit’s important tohavesupport instructions whichyoucan thenopt out ofafter learning.Youneedsomesort ofguidance - at least thefirst timeyouuse thisnew typeofinteractivity.” AnotherSemconproject isSEMar- beta,asupport toolcontrolledbyhand gesturesanda touchscreen.SEMarbeta isanapplicationwhichmakesuseof smartphones’and tablets’camerasand touchscreens. “Thepoint is tobridgeculturaland languagebarrierswhenyouneedhelpin different situations.Incertainsituations -forexample,ifyouaresickat homeor if thecarhasbrokendowninanawk- wardplace- talkingon thephoneisnot enough,”Sundinsays,continuing: “Usingasmartphoneor tablet,you shouldbeable todemonstrateusing gesturesinorder toget help.With SEMarbetayoucandrawandvideo,and the“help”-whichcanbeanythingfrom ahospital toagaragedependingon the situation-canguideyouandshowyou what todo.It hasgreat potentialinareas andsituationswhere thereisinsufficient support right now.Thisispart of the future,preciselybecauseit’ssointuitive. Wehaveusedgesturesfor thousands ofyears.Theyhavealwaysbeen there to helpusguideandexplain.It’sjust that previously therehaven’t beenanygood toolsfor this. Thenext development stageisare- searchproject togetherwithcustomers andpartnersinSwitzerland.1 “IT’SREALLYQUITEFASCINATINGTHAT WEDON’THAVEBETTERPACKAGINGAND LABELLINGOFFOODPRODUCTSEVEN THOUGHTHEYHAVEBEENINSHOPSFOR OVER150YEARS.” Mike Moriarty, partner, AT Kearney SEETHEVIDEOONYOUTUBE Semcon’sGestureConcept explainedin about threeminutes. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 17
  18. 18. as long as 300 years, but this is so far ahead that it is difficult to truly grasp. But there are consequences. The companies that are quickest to take advantage of this will be the winners of the future. Currently, dealers are at the forefront while the manufacturers are waiting to see what the dealers do.” Moriarty also thinks that there is a huge potential market in the over-60s. “There are many examples of developing areas. It’s really quite fascinating that we don’t have better packaging and labelling of food products even though they have been in the shops for over 150 years. We will see continued improvement there. The American company Bumble Bee is one company to have had a rethink. They have created new plastic packaging instead of the cumbersome cans which we have become used to.” Retail companies have also started change programmes. They are building stores which are inclusive for all of society’s age groups and generations. “It is a fact that an improvement for a 65-year-old is usually also an improvement for younger people. A 30-year-old mother will also appreciate plenty of space between shelves and seating to rest from time to time.” The american company Walmart has in- vested in clearer signs and better lighting. ALARM CONTROL Ascomwanted todevelopanewhandset forbed-rid- denpatientsandaskedSemcon tohelp.Semcon studiedhowpatientsuse-andexperience- their handsets,andproducedaset offourdifferent units, designedfordifferent target groupswithdifferent requirements.It wasveryimportant that it should beunderstoodequallywellbychildrenandadultsof different ages.Moreover,it wasrobust,easy togripandeasy towash.Semcondesigned thehandset anddelivereda form-specificCADsystem.Theresult isanergo- nomicdevice that canbereliedonin everysituation. Theworld’slargest economiesin2050 By2050,Chinawillhavelongsince overtaken theUSas theworld’slargest economy.Then,30%ofChinesepeople areexpected tobe60yearsoldorolder. 1.China(2) 2.USA(1) 3.India(10) 4.Japan(3) 5.Germany(4) Current positioninbrackets. SOURCES: CNN, UNAND HSBC “ITISAFACTTHATANIMPROVEMENTFORA65-YEAR-OLDIS USUALLYALSOANIMPROVEMENTFORYOUNGERPEOPLE.A 30-YEAR-OLDMOTHERWILLALSOAPPRECIATEPLENTYOF SPACEBETWEENSHELVESANDSEATINGTORESTONFROM TIMETOTIME.” Mike Moriarty, partner, AT Kearney FOCUS: THE AGING CONSUMER
  19. 19. “I can name many more companies, such as Walgreens in the US and Alliance Boots in the UK. L’Oreal is also a company invest- ing in order to reach an older client group. They have thousands of scientists work- ing on developing products for the elderly. They have also invested in the marketing of their products, using older people in their advertising. In the US, Diane Keaton is the face of the company, and she’s almost 70 years old.” THE BIG CORPORATIONS’initiatives have an im- pact on society as a whole, thinks Moriarty. “What they do matters. Changes to their shops inspire and more or less force author- ities to make changes. This is about entire cities emerging and how authorities approach urban development. This will lead to our cities adapting in order to be more accessible and open to an aging population.” EXPERTS ALREADY KNOW a lot about the future and life in 2050 - and how companies need to think in order to achieve success. “I hope we will have a more realistic and positive image of an aging person as an ex- perienced individual,”says Britt Östlund. “Then I hope that we will have developed methods to make the technology work in practice. If we are to succeed in creating products or services, we have to ask what it means to live a modern older life. Then you can’t come out with stereotypes such as that everyone is equal.” Ajit Kambil is sure that the focus will shift from capturing 20-year-old consumers to at- tracting them over a 60-year-period. “The most important question to ask your- self is how to develop a product that an older person would want to buy and use. You have to be aware that an older person will perceive a product in a completely different way from the other younger customer groups that it is also aimed at.” photo: 123RF FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 19
  20. 20. THE SOLUTIONHOW SEMCON SOLVED THE CUSTOMER’S PROBLEM ASSIGNMENT: Elos Fixturlaser gave Semcon an assignment to develop the next generation of axel alignment systems for a variety of clients from wind power to the paper industry. The task was to further improve the quality and user experience to new levels. SOLUTION: Since Semcon also designed the previous version, the challenge was to retain what worked and continue developing its user-friendliness, robustness and interface. Meanwhile, Semcon wanted to create a design that demonstrated the same straightness and sharpness provided by the system. During the largely brand-oriented development work, Semcon provided industrial design, engineering, production support, interface design and images for marketing. RESULTS: Using a user-friendly touchscreen, a new interface and two laser-based measuring devices, the Fixturlaser NXA Pro is more effective than ever. At the same time, the device is as easy to use as a smartphone. With animated 3D graphics, colour-coded measurement results and an icon-based user interface, Semcon and Fixturlaser have taken a big step into the future of axel alignment systems. TEXT OLLE RÅDE PHOTOS FIXTURLASER Ontrackwithlasers 20 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  21. 21. CLARITY Clearlymarkedmovingand stationarylaserdevices reduce theriskoferrorwhen connecting thesystem. QUICK START Themeasurement area which thelaserbeamhits hasahighcontrast tofind thecorrect default settings quickly. STABLE Materialsanddesignwhich exuderobustnesscombined withqualityandprecision. FLEXIBLE Thinnerlaserdevicesenable measurementsinnarrower spaces thanpreviously. CLEAR INTERFACE Ananimated3Dinterface enhancesclarityandsimplifies themanagement ofadvanced measurements.Theactualpo- sitionof themotorandmea- surement unitsisdisplayedon theinterfacebyusingagyro. ALWAYS READY Abatteryindicatormeans that youcaneasily ensure thesystem’sbatteriesarechargedbe- fore takingameasurement.Thisisdonewith the touchofabuttonwithout having toboot up thesystem,saving timeandreducing the riskofdisruptingcomplexmeasurements. EASYADJUSTMENT Clamps toensureheight adjustment of thelaser unitsinrelation toeach otherisquickandeasy. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 21
  22. 22. Powercell’sPowerpack isinhere. 22 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 AndreasBodén Development manager, Powercell Robert Eliasson Account manager, Semcon
  23. 23. Fuelcellsforgreenelectricityaremovingfromthelabto everydaylifeatafastpace.Powercellisoneoftheplayers drivingthisdevelopment.Theyhavebeencollaboratingwith Semconsince2008inanexchangeofskillswherethewhole provedtobegreaterthantheindividualparts. TEXTJOHAN JARNEVING PHOTO ANNA SIGVARDSSON I n a secluded industrial area in Göte- borg, the energy source of the future is taking shape. Here, the energy technology company Powercell is de- veloping its own patented technology for the environmentally-friendly and energy-efficient generation of electricity from fuel cells. Their latest innovation is called Powerpac – a minor revolution which transforms ordinary diesel into hydrogen gas, which then powers a fuel cell. The technique is based on a combination of diesel reforming which transforms diesel into hydrogen and a fuel cell which converts hydrogen into electricity using air. THE RESULT IS a quiet, clean and cost-effective way to provide cell-phone towers in the desert with electricity, for example. The technolo- gy can also be used to power air conditioners and refrigerators in trucks, reducing unneces- sary engine use. Powerpac is also suitable in a number of other fields where the clean and efficient generation of electricity is important. Powerpac was demonstrated to the press and the market earlier this year and is now ready for the next stage: field testing and in- dustrialization. Semcon has worked closely together with Powercell for some time, from the pure research stage to the present, when the tech- nology is mature enough to begin optimi- zation for industrial manufacturing. It is a collaboration that both parties have learned a lot from. POWERCELL HAS IN-DEPTH expertise in fuel cells and has thus served as a kind of school for Semcon. For its part, Semcon has all the tech- nical consultancy skills Powercell needs in their own organization. “I see Powercell as a‘preferred customer’. Our knowledge develops their processes while we ourselves develop in a new and strategical- ly important area. A successful cross-fertili- zation of skills,”says Robert Eliasson, account manager at Semcon. Semcon has supported Powercell through the various stages of development. Construction (both mechanical and electronic), prototyping, visualization, control engineering and indus- trial design are some of the specialist services that Semcon has brought to the project. Andreas Bodén is development manager at Powercell. He is happy to emphasize how the different specialists have worked together to achieve this success. “We complement each other and have great confidence in each other’s expertise. We all speak the same language, which is especially important when pressed for time,” he says. There is a certain scope to the collabora- tion between Powercell and Semcon. So far they have only scratched the surface, and new projects are constantly arising during the course of the development. For Semcon, the collaboration goes hand in hand with strategic investment in energy efficiency in transport. It is a textbook example of a strong partnership: shared expertise and a shared commitment to the future. POWERCELL IS AT an advanced stage of devel- opment and has several research projects in the pipeline. When President Obama visited Sweden in September, eco-technology in general and fuel cells in particular were one of the themes of his schedule. Powercell’s S1 fuel cell was another of the innovations which the president looked at more closely during his visit to KTH Royal Institute of Technology. THE WORLD IS waiting for fuel cells - and Pow- ercell is going to get us there faster than we think. FUEL CELLS OFTHE FUTURE FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 23
  24. 24. Statoil’sTrollAplatformintheNorthSea supplieslargepartsofEuropewithenergy.But toworkitneedsitsownpowersupply,ajob whereSemconisresponsibleforthetesting. TEXTOLA LILJEDAHL PHOTOS KRISTOFER SKOG & ABB SAFE ELECTRICITY ATSEA 24 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  25. 25. I n the middle of the North Sea, among waves and icy winds, stands the Troll A oil platform, ultimate proof that man has succeeded in mastering the fifth element. With a height that overshadows the Eiffel Tower, the platform, when it was towed 38 nautical miles in 1995, became the largest building ever moved. The opening ceremony took place, ap- propriately enough, on 17 May - Norway’s national day. The name Troll A comes from the gas and oil field Troll located on the Nor- wegian continental shelf. Troll accounts for about 40% of all gas reserves on the Norwegian continental shelf and is one of the cornerstones of Norwegian gas pro- duction. ONE OF MANY challenges with oil rigs is energy supply. Statoil, which owns and operates Troll A, has chosen to use two HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) links from ABB for this purpose. ABB is a world leader in HVDC transmission technology, which transfers power with lower losses compared to the conventional alternating technique. The first agreement between ABB and Statoil dates from 2002. With new environmental directives and a continued strong demand for exports, Statoil faces new challenges. It is overseas, mainly to Germany, Belgium and France, where the gas is exported. “Norway uses virtually no gas itself, but the Norwegian government has contracts to deliver a certain quantity of gas every month to Europe,”says Jarno Väkiparta, project manager at ABB. He continues: “There is always natural pressure in the reservoir when you start to extract gas from the sea. After a while the pressure decreases. In this case, we then employ two compressors, which were delivered by ABB in 2005.” The compressors ensured that Statoil could maintain desired production capac- ity - at least until the end of 2010. Now, work is starting once again on upgrading performance, something that can be done in several ways. SOME OF THE options evaluated involved powering compressors with gas turbine turbines or diesel engines. Both meth- ods would involve emissions. The HVDC alternative is different and transfers envi- ronmentally-friendly hydroelectric power from the mainland. With the fact that emission standards have become tougher in the Norwegian oil and gas industry, in the end the HVDC FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 25
  26. 26. links were chosen. ABB thus received a new order from Statoil worth about 270 mil- lion US dollars, which comprises two new compressor drive systems which will help increase the flow in the pipeline. ABB will deliver two high-voltage DC transmission systems, as well as an HVDC converter and submarine cables to ensure a reliable power transmission from land to the platform. SEMCON HAS BEEN chosen to work on the test- ing of the control systems on the HVDC links Troll 3 and Troll 4. “The project is taking place both here in Ludvika, where all the components are con- nected to a simulator, and then on site, where we have to get what works in theory to work in practice,”says Lennie Edman-Terning, commissioning specialist at Semcon, who has been responsible for the testing. First, tests will be done in Ludvika. New testing then will be performed on site in Norway and 38 nautical miles offshore. “It’s only there that we’ll know for sure whether all the studies and all the parame- ters in the simulation environment have been correct, or if we need to adjust the control equipment settings to get everything to run smoothly,”says Edman-Terning. He says that this is a unique project, just like every HVDC project. Each customer has their own unique needs, and technology moves so fast that there is another form of control system on the new link compared to the ten-year-old one. “It’s very different to the automotive in- dustry, where I come from. Everyone has their own subjective opinion about a car - how it should be, feel and act. But no one has any opinion about what an HVDC system should look like as very few apart from us working on them know what it is about.” Jarno Väkiparta stresses the importance of Lennie’s work, both in Ludvika and Norway. “Right now a module and a land station are being built on two different sites. One in Kollsnes and one in Haugesund, where Lennie will be responsible for the commissioning of the control and protection system.” IN THE SUMMER 2014 the module will be trans- ported from the mainland to the Troll A plat- form and by 2015 everything will be finished and in operation. 1 About: HVDC HVDC technology is available in two variants, HVDC Classic and HVDC Light.HVDC Classic was first used when Asea built the Gotland link in 1954.HVDC Light was developed by ABB in the 1990s,and is the technology used in the work onTroll 3 andTroll 4.HVDC Light offers numerous environmental benefits,such as “invisible”power lines,neutral magnetic fields, oil-free cables and compact converter stations. JarnoVäkiparta Project Manager,ABB LennieEdman-Terning Commissioningspecialist,Semcon 26 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  27. 27. BREADMAKER OBH NORDICA INOX 6544 “It’s fun to bake bread properly,but when you don’t have much time a breadmaker is a great alternative.You put all the ingredients in the bowl and set the time when you want it to be ready.And then you wake up to the smell of freshly-baked bread in the morning.A great luxury! One loaf is enough for breakfast for the whole family at home,plus it’s really easy to clean and you don’t get flour all over the kitchen.” SOFHIA JOSBORG TECHNICAL INSTRUCTOR, SEMCON INTERESTS: Yoga,dance and playing with my kids. LAST GADGET PURCHASED: A stand-on board for the pram, for children. GADGETS I LIKE ICE-CREAM MACHINE PHILIPS HR2304 “I love ice-cream,and with my ice-cream machine I can make my favourite recipes and experiment with new ones.It’s used a lot,especially in the summer,which is also appreciated by my children,and our neigh- bours,and our neighbours’children ...It’s a real source of happiness!” MOBILE PHONE AND HEADPHONES IPHONE 5 “Just like many other people,it’s the gadget I use most every day. I listen a lot to music and radio,and watch documentaries and se- ries.Before I went on maternity leave I com- muted for three hours a day.The mobile has saved many rainy days on the train.” FOTO:PÄRPERSSON TRAINERS NIKE AIR MAX 90 “I have a weakness for smart trainers - either in bright colours or a more classic white.These are stylish and your feet feel good - you can easily take long walks in them.” “It’s really fun to ride off-road, I like to go fast.” BICYCLE NISHIKI XC5 CROSSHYBRID “With a good,fast bike I can get where I like in town,but it also works on trails in the woods – it’s really fun to ride off-road,I like to go fast.It’s also an eco-friendly way of getting about,and I get fit- ter into the bargain.”
  28. 28. 28 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 Q&A KATHERINE KUCHENBECKER HAPTICS EXPERT Today, with the help of technology, we can now see and hear what’s happening on the other side of the world. Now, haptics expert KatherineKuchenbecker wants to add another sense to the equation and make it possible to use touch over long distances. atherine Kuchenbecker has always been a hands-on kind of person. But as a leading authority in the exciting and still relatively new research area of haptics, the things she touches may not actu- ally be there. Or it might be a robot that is doing the touching for her. Kuchen- becker, who is Associate Professor
of Mechanical En- gineering and Applied Mechanics and Comput- er and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, researches the design and control of systems that fool our sense of touch, making it possible to feel virtual objects or far-off environ- ments as though they were right in front of us. Fooling our sense of touch in this way, through the use of electromechanical sensors, actuators and high-speed computer control, has many interesting applications, from personal robots and tablet computers to robot-assisted surgery and stroke rehabilitation. Kuchenbecker spoke to Future to discuss why robots need a sense touch, how she can take a physical snapshot of – and then recreate virtually – an object’s surface, and when we can expect to feel the keys on our smartphone screens. What is so interesting to you about our sense of touch? What intrigues me about the sense of touch is that we know much less about it than vision or hearing, which are the other two main senses that we use to interact with our surroundings. The sense of touch is fundamental to human interac- tion with the world, and you can’t turn it off. As a mechanical engineer, someone who was always fascinated by how things move and how things work, I am captivated by haptics because that is where the physical world encounters an intel- ligent agent, be it a human, a robot, or another organism. From a family perspective, my father is TEXT DAVID WILES PHOTOS DAVE MOSER K
  29. 29. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 29 Katherine Kuchenbecker Position:Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics and Com- puter and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania Hobbies: Scuba diving and dancing What was the last book you read,and what did you think of it? Mistaken Identity by Lisa Scottoline.I had fun trying to figure out the sto- ry’s twists and turns,and,as with Scottoline’s other books,I liked learning more about the city where I live – Philadelphia! What haptics-enhanced device are you most looking forward to having in your everyday life? I’d love a haptic interface that lets me pet my cat,Toby,when I’m traveling.
  30. 30. 30 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 a surgeon and works with his hands every day to try to save people’s lives, and my moth- er is a professor of research psychology, a scholar who studies humans; haptics is a nice intersection between those two, with a bit of technology mixed in. How would you explain haptics to the uniniti- ated? Haptics centres on touch interaction. When you manipulate everyday objects, you feel forces, contacts, vibrations, and temperature changes on your hand. We want to endow human-computer interfaces with the same richness of haptic sensation. As a haptics en- gineer, I am developing devices and software that fool the human sense of touch so that the user can interact with virtual objects or ob- jects that are distant and feel as though there is really something there – even though it is just a computer program. Some of our other haptics research focuses on a robot touching real objects. We want to make the robot good with its hands so that it can clean up your kitchen or feed your cat and do all the things we would love a helper to do. Doing those tasks requires the robot to have a very good sense of touch, just as it would need a very good sense of vision and an ability to hear and process sounds. Why is this an important field of research? The sense of touch is so important for everyday human interactions. I think it is easy to underestimate the value of high-quality haptic feedback. The sense of touch is a pri- vate and salient and easy-to-interpret chan- nel for receiving information. As more inter- actions are mediated by technology, I think we need to think about creating interfaces that deliver haptic sensations to humans, because that is the kind of environment that humans are naturally adapted to: physical objects that provide forces and contact sensations instead of virtual objects that may only be visual ele- ments on a screen. How do you capture how an object feels? Many researchers have worked on this problem of how to create synthetic haptic feedback to give the user the compelling il- lusion that they are touching something that isn’t there. What we have done differently is to make a device like a touch-based camera that can record real data during interactions with objects. While a standard camera can record everything the eye might see, we cre- ate instruments that can record everything a Q&A KATHERINE KUCHENBECKER HAPTICS EXPERT
  31. 31. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 31 human hand would feel. Our haptic record- ing device can measure exactly how much force you’re applying and which direction you are pushing on things. We know exactly where the tool is in space and what its ori- entation is, and then we can measure the high-frequency vibrations, the shaking back and forth, the subtle shock that occurs at the start of contact. Even though your fingers are not in direct contact with the surface when using a tool like this, you are able to understand its roughness and its texture and what the surface is made of. Then we have created a set of software algorithms to ana- lyse the data and process it and turn it into a compact representation of the surface so that you can touch a virtual version through one of our custom haptic interfaces. Howdoestheuserexperiencehaptictechnology? Just the other day I felt the very first ver- sion of our texture models on a 3-D object. My students made a sphere that you cannot see but you can reach out and touch through a small device that sits on the desk. You hold a stylus in your hand, and as you drag across the surface you can feel these da- ta-driven surface texture models. They were able to make it feel like a blanket or a piece of cork or a piece of metal – we have 100 different textures! The way it works is that when you hold the tool still, you just feel the stiffness of the surface, but then as you drag it along you feel two things: you feel friction, the resistance to the motion of the tool along the surface, and you feel the tex- ture, the quick changes in vibration, the back and forth shaking of the virtual tool tip as it travels across the little ridges and valleys of the surface. Those three forces together give you a very compelling illusion that you’re touching a real surface. So that involves using a tool.What about in- teracting with the virtual world with our bare hands? I’m really interested in moving into direct finger interactions with surfaces. It is really challenging to recreate touch sensations for a human to feel, so now we are focused on giv- ing a robot better touch intelligence. We put a pair of fingertip sensors on a humanoid robot called Graspy and taught him how to touch objects and then describe them with adjec- tives that a human might use:‘this feels fluffy and soft’or‘this is rough and unpleasant’. Where is the haptics field going? I can imagine what we are going to be doing next month, and somewhat imagine what we will be doing next year. But beyond that, it is hard to say. Now we are seeing a lot more push towards tactile interfaces, towards bare-finger interaction, towards creating tem- perature feedback. And we could be heading towards a lot of interesting wearable hap- tic interfaces and mobile devices; as you are walking around the city you could be getting haptic clues telling you which direction you ought to turn. What about mobile applications? In the mobile field there is some very cool research. One approach is to change the coef- ficient of friction between your finger and the screen. They do this by vibrating the screen very quickly, which makes your finger skate across the screen very easily. And when they stop, the glass feels rather sticky. So they can modify how easy it is for your finger to slide across the screen over time and over space to give you the illusion that you are touching something rough or maybe make the buttons sticky so your finger stays on the buttons and glides in other areas. Disney Research is working on electrically attracting your finger to the screen so it is harder for it to move. There is a lot of work that can and is being done in this area. But I would say that direct haptic feedback on mobile devices is still a ways off because it is tough to integrate such technologies into tiny packages. 1 “Thesenseoftouchis fundamentaltohuman interactionwiththeworld, andyoucan’tturnitoff.” KatherineKuchenbecker,Hapticsexpert Whichareaswouldstand to makemostfromhaptics? 1 MEDICAL TRAINING AND SKILL ASSESSMENT FOR SURGEONS: I see great potential for haptics in medical simulation and training.In my own lab we have been studying how providing haptic tool vibration feedback during robotic surgery training benefits residents,and we have been able to show that it does seem to really help them learn to do a procedure faster.When will all surgical trainees be using a haptic simulator? Possibly within five years,but it’s hard to say. 2 MOBILE DEVICES/TABLETS: We have so many screen-mediated interac- tions,and there is so little haptic feedback there now because it is a tough technological problem.The richness of your phone’s haptic sensa- tions falls well short of its richness of graphical and audio feedback.It is about space and power con- sumption and getting the hardware and software to react fast enough and to present a rich array of haptic signals.Samsung is heavily investing in haptic technologies and they see this as an area where they could beat Apple.I think we will see a slow evolution. 3 GAMING: I love theWii and the Kinect.With the Wiimote when I hit that virtual tennis ball,I do feel something and I do hear a sound that increases the illusion that I just hit a tennis ball. But there is a lot of potential for haptic technology to make gaming systems even more compelling. It is all about immersiveness.It needs to improve, and it will.
  32. 32. 32 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 TEXT JOHANNA LAGERFORS & JOHAN JARNEVING PHOTOS MIKAEL GÖTHAGE, ANDERS DEROS & ISTVAN LABADY SEMCON BRAINS 32 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 The quality expert “IF A COMPANY carriesout its qualityworkinasensibleway,then it becomessuccessful.Thisviewhas alwaysbeenreflectedinmywork.” So says Daniel Carlsson, who has an M.Sc. in chemical technol- ogy and whose main field of ex- pertise is quality assurance within medical device. During the35assignmentshe hashadasaconsultant,Danielhas workedwithpacemakers,hearing aids,dentalproducts,imagingequip- ment,andanaesthesiamachines, amongothers.“Helping thecustom- erwithexactlywhat I’mgoodat is agreat responsibility.Forme,the challengeis tosee thingsfromboth thecustomer’sand theenduser’s perspective.” Agreat dealofqualityworkin medicaldeviceisabout riskmini- mization-creatingmachinesand aids that aresafeforpatients.For anumberofyears,therehasalso beenadirective that dictatesall medicaldeviceproductsshouldbe user-friendly. “Itsimplifiesdoctors’workand minimizestheriskoferror.Historically therehavebeenaccidentswhere healthcareprofessionalsinstressful situationshaveturnedaswitchupin- steadofdown.Suchthingsshouldn’t beallowedtohappen,”hesays. Recently,hevisitedthedentist,who scrapedofftartarwithanewdevice whichwaslessunpleasantthanusual. “It made a big difference for me as a patient, and I try to take such experiences with me to work. Product development which focuses on the customer’s needs inspires me,”he says. Healso thinks that riskmitiga- tionleads toopportunitiesfornew innovations. “Whenyouhavetoconsiderrisks usersmaybeexposedto,itcreates newsolutions.Sometimesbrandnew featuresemerge-anexamplefrom theautomotiveindustrythatevery- onecanrelatetoiswhentheairbag wasinventedtominimizetheriskof crashinjuriesforpassengers.Today, airbagsarestandardinallcars.” daniel carlsson, senior quality and project manager, semcon sweden
  33. 33. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.20103 33FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 33 BEHINDTHESCENES WITHSEMCONBRAINS Want toknowmoreabout Daniel,his workandthechallengeshehasfacedat Semcon?Seethefilmat semcon.com.
  34. 34. 34 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 “I WENT INTO embeddedsystemsbe- causeI thinkit’smorefun toworkona combinationofhardwareandsoftware.” ThisiswhatPederAlm,anengineer whoworksasaproductdeveloperat SemconEmbedded&Electronicsin Göteborg,thinks. Here,customers are helped to devel- op competitive products by offering specialist expertise in a range of areas, such as software,hardware,architec- ture and dynamic control systems. An increased need for connectivity and flexible products places great demands on technological develop- ment.His job is usually to programme the systems of new products after the designer has decided which features should be in the menus.It has given him a passion for products with dis- plays,he says. “Ilikevisualthings-workingwith whatyoucansee.Sometimesit’sabout makingiteasiertogetconstructivefeed- backfromtheusersoftheproduct.” Almappreciatesthevarietythatcomes withtheconsultantrole-thathesome- timesworksatSemconandsometimes onsitewiththecustomer. “Mostofthetimeyouchangeassign- menteveryyearortwo,whichmeans thatyouarealwaysfairlynewandthus tryalittleharder,”hesays. Hereceivedhismostrecentassign- ment thankstoaformerclientcalling withanassignmentforhisnewemploy- er.Hiscontactnetworkisgrowingover time,creatingmoreandmoreopportuni- tiesforinterestingassignments. Heworkspart timeasteammanager, whichhethinksisgoodasitallowshim tocontinuewiththetechnicalaspects. Heisresponsibleforpersonnelmatters butnotforsales. “Thearrangementisgreatforme.AsI haven’tbeenamanagerbeforeandam notatrainedsalesperson,it’snicetobe abletotakeonestepatatime.” The expert in embedded systems peder alm, team manager and product developer within embedded systems, semcon sweden SEMCON BRAINS 34 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013
  35. 35. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.20103 35FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 35 IT’S EASY TO tell that ZsófiaDalihasfound the right career.Sheisdrivenbya truepassionfor lifelonglearningandhasakeeninterest inde- sign-characteristics that come to theforefront inherroleasdeveloperofSemcone-learning solutions. “It’sallabout knowledge transferandcom- munication.Alearningprocesswhichisnot affectedby thesubject orindustry.My taskis to sift through theinformation,pickout themost important partsandpresent it invariousinter- activeinterfaces.Thelearnershouldbeenticed toclick throughandlearnmore.” Shehasadegreein teachingandhasworked one-learninginmultinationalorganizations. Shehasbeenat Semconfornearly twoyears andsees thegrowingpotentialofe-learning. “Development isinitsinfancy.Manystill haveaninaccurateviewofcomplex technolo- gyandcooldesign that wehave toovercome. Goode-learningisbasedonsimplicityand technology that worksfor theuser. E-learninghas theadvantageofnot being dependent on timetablesandclassrooms. Learningbecomescompletelyflexible,andwith theright toolscanbebothentertainingand effective.That iswhat Zsófiaandhercolleagues makesureof. Therearecurrently threepeoplein the e-learning teaminBudapest,but theywill surelyneedreinforcementsin thefuture.Then, shewants tocontinue todevelopherspecialist skillsand takeamorestrategicrole,creating storyboardsandshaping theeducational process.Anobviousambitionforsomeone workinginlifelonglearning. The e-learning expert ZSÓFIA dali, technical writer and e-learning consultant, semcon hungary
  36. 36. 36 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 Eightlanguages,sevensubsidiariesindifferent countriesandaproductwhichadministerstensof thousandsofkeysandlockcylinders.Theseweresome ofthechallengeswhenSemcontookonthetaskof creatingabetterandsmartermanualfortheCLIQlock systemforASSAABLOY. TEXT JOHAN LARSSON PHOTOS KRISTOFER SAMUELSSON 7 MANUALS 8 LANGUAGES
  37. 37. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 37  JohanHäggbom Project Manager,ASSAABLOY SharedTechnologies. PetterDahlman InformationEngineer, Semcon.
  38. 38. 38 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 T he cliq locking system developed by Assa Abloy consists of, among other things, an electronic lock cylinder which can be put into standard door locks, padlocks and other standard locks. In the cylinder is a circuit that is activated when an electronic key is inserted into the lock. Within the key, conditions and permissions are stored which determine if the lock can be opened or not. Keys and cylinders are ad- ministered by the central software CLIQ Web Manager. The system makes it easy to control which individuals have access to open differ- ent locks, and at what times. It also makes it possible to see who has come and gone in one place, as well as dealing with lost keys. Although the system’s uses are easy to understand, the administration can be very complex when the system is used in real life. This was something that became clear when Semcon’s Petter Dahlman began work on de- veloping the new software manual. “Some customers have very large systems with tens of thousands of keys and cylinders. And these have to be administered and loaded with different permissions for different users. Incredibly advanced features configure this. It was a challenge for us first to understand how it works and then describe it to others,”says Dahlman. THIS MEANS THAT the system manual is ex- tremely comprehensive. In addition to this is the fact that CLIQ is sold in a number of different markets around the world by Assa Abloy’s local subsidiaries. Because the stand- ards for locks are different, the lock cylinders and keys vary depending on the country. This means that the manual needs to be translated into various languages but also that the actual mechanics have different features and appear- ances. The subsidiaries also have their own brands and graphical profiles, which require additional customization. PREVIOUSLY EVERY SUBSIDIARY created its own manual. But this took time and cost money. The companies wanted to avoid this work and “It was a challenge for us first to understand how it works and then describe it to others.” Petter Dahlman, information engineer, Semcon About: CLIQ CLIQ is an electronic lock system with cylinders which fits in ordinary locks. Information is stored in the keys regarding the conditions and permissions that de- termine if the lock can be opened or not. Keys and cylinders are administrated by an online tool.The cylinder does not need its own power source - this comes from the key.Therefore,the system is suitable for geographically-dispersed installations and where you cannot have or do not want a battery or other power source in the lock.
  39. 39. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 39 appealed to the development unit Assa Abloy Shared Technologies to find a central solu- tion. Semcon was selected for the assignment to structure the information and find a way to create customized manuals for different markets efficiently. “Semcon also carries out technical con- sultancy for Assa Abloy, and that was one of the reasons we chose Semcon for this assignment. Semcon staff have a technical understanding that has impressed us. It’s not just about understanding how to struc- ture the information but also understanding the product. Because it’s a complex system,” says Johan Häggbom, project manager at Assa Abloy Shared Technologies. Semcon’s Petter Dahlman first received five local manuals from different subsidiaries. His first task was to coordinate the infor- mation so that it could be managed by Assa Abloy centrally from Stockholm. It turned out that the manuals were not only in different languages, but there were also significant dif- ferences in quality and what information that was included. “At the start, we had to rewrite a lot. Then we had to make it understandable and tailor it for different audiences who need different types of information,”says Dahlman. When it came to writing the contents of the manual, Dahlman had help from his Sem- con colleague Sophia Faitt. BEFORE THE CONTENT of the manual was fin- ished, Dahlman structured the information using a‘topic-based’method. This means that you divide the content into smaller pieces ac- cording to specific topics. Each text deals with just one subject and should be understanda- ble on its own, i.e. regardless of the context in which it is presented. This topic-based way of writing makes it possible to reuse materi- al and to present information in a variety of ways without it being strange to the reader. For example, if a company wants to have a manual that only caters to a certain type of user, it is easy to create a version that con- tains only the necessary parts. You can, for example, produce a“Getting Started”guide PetterDahlman InformationEngineer, Semcon. JohanHäggbom Project Manager,ASSAABLOY SharedTechnologies.
  40. 40. 40 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 About: Kentucky Kentucky is an information management system developed by Semcon.The system is used by customers who need to manage large amounts of information in many different forms and versions.The content is stored as XML,which means that text and style information as fonts,colours and images are stored separately.This makes it easy to publish content in different versions with different appearances depending on the purpose.Kentucky also manages mul- tiple versions or translations of the same content,for example. with the most basic features, or a manual which excludes features which the customer hasn’t bought. This approach also means that in the future it will be easy to create a web- based help site or a mobile app, among other things. “The challenge is to think of different formats and units right from the start. If you think in the right way from the start it gets easier at the end,”says Dahlman. To manage the contents of the manual, the XML-based information management tool, Kentucky, is used. This was developed by Semcon for situations where companies have a lot of information that has to be adapted in a lot of different ways for different needs. With Kentucky, every unit saves informa- tion in just one place, but it can then be used in different contexts. It is easy to reuse the information and you just need to update it in one place when there are changes. The system is already used with around fifteen other customers. WITH THE NEW set-up, subsidiaries don’t have to produce their own manuals. They tell us instead what information they want, in which language and how it should look, and then Semcon generates a custom manual. There are many advantages to this. “Local companies get a manual at a lower cost in terms of both time and money. But they also get more complete and more accu- rate information,”says Dahlman. “We developed the product and are now also updating the manual. We can deliver everything at the same time. Moreover, there is only one source of information and there- fore no risk that it is different in different versions of the manual,”says Urban Well- holm, director of product innovation at Assa Abloy, who commissioned the project. “Now, local companies can get a working manual as soon as a new version of the prod- uct is ready,”says Johan Häggbom. Kentucky keeps track of languages, chang- es, and version control. The tool also keeps track of what has already been translated and so does not need to be translated again in an updated version. This leads to cost-effective translations. THE NEXT STEP in the project is adding more languages. Currently the manual is in eight languages. However, the target is 20. “20 languages and seven companies gives you 140 possible combinations of language and profile. That’s when Kentucky really comes into its own,”says Petter Dahlman. Another step is making information available in other forms such as the internet or a mobile app. Everyone involved can also see that, even if nothing is agreed right now, the same approach could be used for other Assa Abloy products. “The project has deliberately been an evalua- tion on our part to see how it worked. And we are extremely satisfied,”says Häggbom. 1 “Now, local companies can get a working manual as soon as a new version of the product is ready.” Johan Häggbom, project manager, Assa Abloy Shared Technologies
  41. 41. The Sonic Movement reimagines what vehicles could sound like. The project is a result of close-knit collaboration between engineers, designers and sound artists. WORDS LINATÖRNQUIST PHOTO LUKE CASEY N ew technologies can give rise to entirely new pro- blems. But they can also bring urgency to solving old problems in new ways. “With the emergence of electric vehicles, we wanted to think about how vehicles can interact differently with their environment,”says Fernando Ocaña, cre- ative director at Semcon’s design department. Together with hybrid designer James Brooks he initiated Sonic Movement, a Semcon colla- boration with US music/art duo Holly Hern- don and Mat Dryhurst, which aims to work out how car sounds can be reimagined. In the past, the problem with vehicle sounds – such as motors and sirens – is that they have often been far too loud. But today, electric cars are being criticised as a hazard to pedestrians for being too quiet. And the project is, in part, a reaction to new law under discussion in the US that may legislate for what sounds electric vehicles should make, in an effort to increase traffic safety. “Our fear was that once something beco- mes implemented it becomes impossible to change. If a big car company introduces the sound of a V8 engine into an electric vehicle or adds an annoying bleeping sound, almost immediately you’ll find that it sets legisla- tion,”says James Brooks.“But the project was also a way to start working with something that resonates on a cultural level and an opp- ortunity to work with someone like Holly who understands sound in a completely dif- ferent way.” For sound artist Holly Herndon the project presented a different type of challenge from the way she normally works:“The project is not only about personal expression, it is about safety codes and reimagining what the future sounds like,”she says.“I wanted to THE NEW SOUND OF OUR CITIEScreate something that sounded like the future but with human elements – not a 1960’s ver- sion of the future.” THE PROJECT TEAM drew on Semcon’s broad ex- pertise and includes, among others, inhouse sound engineers and sound designers. Their rethink of vehicle sounds has prompted inte- rest from the automotive industry, tech firms and coverage in the BBC after the premiere at IAA motor show in Frankfurt. These positive reactions to the project are a testament to that fact that the project fills a need the auto industry has not been addressing. “It makes sense to people that we could change the way our cars sound – and ultima- tely the way our cities sound,”says Fernando Ocaña. ”It shows the strength of research based on a more exploratory approach and it is a way of working we plan to replicate with other projects.” “In the end,”James Brooks fills in,“we’re just raising questions. We’re laying out con- cepts. As a passer-by, why do I have to hear the horn of a car far away? Why can’t that be a sound that is directed with directional speakers towards the person in front? New technologies are opening up new possibilities to solve those issues.”1 Listen to theresult ofSemconsinnovative soundcollaboration:SonicMovement. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 41
  42. 42. 42 FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 SEMCON UPDATEWHAT’S HAPPENING IN SEMCON’S WORLD THE BANGALORE OFFICE hasrecentlyrunapro- ject with the theme“Yournext generationwill thankyou.”Thegoalis toraiseawarenessofhow peopleaffect theenvironment andwhat wecan doso that ourchildrenandgrandchildrencan haveahighqualityoflife. Aspart of theproject Semconhashelped schoolchildren toplant trees.Thisisbothasym- bolicandconcreteexampleofwhat wecanalldo forourenvironment. “Ourschoolsare thebest place tostart a project like this,wherewecandirectlyeducate thechildren,”saysKishoreKumarGattu,Acting ManagingDirector,SemconIndia. Activitiesincludeanessaycontest on the topic ofpollution,a’GoGreen’drawingcompetition andadebateon themajorrolewhichplantsand treesplay. Oneof theissuesdiscussedwas that“wesave upforourstudiesandculturalexperiences-why not forcleanair,water,fuelsourcesandcropsfor futuregenerations?” “Everyoneagreedthatweneedtoreduceemis- sions,thatdrinkingwaterisrunningout,that the airwebreatheismakingussickandthat thereis lesslandforustogrowfood,”saysKishore. It wasallverymuchappreciatedbyboth studentsand teachers,andit openedup the opportunity tocontinuewithsome typeofpro- grammein thefuture. At Semconweweremotivatedby theactivity andhope toimplement moreCSRinitiativesin thefuture. GreeninitiativefromSemconIndia PHOTO: SEMCON
  43. 43. FUTURE BY SEMCON 3.2013 43 SemconexpandsinnorthernSweden WhenSemcon’sLuleåofficeopened,it becameSemcon’snorthernmost operation. “WiththeLuleåofficewearestrengtheningourpositioninthenorthofSweden,an attractiveareainwhichwewant tocontinuetoincreaseourbusinessandpresence,” saysOlofChristensson,PresidentofbusinessareaDesign&Development.“Ourinitialfo- cusisondeliveringservicestocustomersprimarilyintheenergy,processingandmining sectors.” JensBergisresponsibleforLuleåoperations,whicharecontinuallyexpanding.This means that Semconnowhas46officesspreadacrossninecountries. DeLavalandSemconformapartnership DeLaval,whichworksprimarilywithmilkproduction technicalsolutions,hasonce againcontractedSemcon tobeitsexclusiveproviderofaftermarket services. “DeLavalisactivearound theworldandweneedapartnerwhichislarger than most Swedishconsultingcompanies.Thefact that Semconisaglobally-estab- lishedcompanywasakeyfactorin thedecision,”saysThomasFunck,managerat DeLavalBASharedSupport Services. TheSemconsitesinvolvedin theworkarelocatedinSweden,theUKand Hungary. FocusontheenvironmentattheIAAfairinFrankfurt WHEN THE ANNUAL IAA fairwas heldinFrankfurt,Semconwas thereofcourse.SonicMovement (readmoreonpage41)receiveda lot ofattention,asdid thefocuson rechargeablehybridenginesand electriccars. “Wewereclose tooneof the mainentrances,whichmeant that manyof thevisitorswalkedbyand wereable tostopat ourboothand interact withusandlookat our information,”saysJohanDarsbo, BusinessDevelopment Directorat AutomotiveR&D. Inaddition,wewere treated toa glimpseintowhat theautomotive industrywillofferin thefuture -largerinfotainment systems withlargerscreensofferingmore real-timeinformation. PHOTO:SEMCONPHOTO:DELAVAL PHOTO:123RF
  44. 44. futurebysemcon#32013 “Thefeelingof goingreallyfast isaddictive” ANN-CHARLOTTE EKLUND AFTER WORK name Ann-Charlotte Eklund. at work Project Manager in the pharmaceutical and medical technology industry. after work Roller derby training. current challengeTo get better at tackling harder! TEXT:MAGNUSCARLSSONPHOTO:MATTIASBARDÅ About me “I work a lot and spend a lot of my free time playing roller derby.Both training and getting involved in the voluntary aspect of the association.I’m 31 and live in Södermalm in Stockholm.” About my job “I work as a project management consultant at a large pharmaceutical company.There I manage investment projects within tablet manufacture.I have been at Sem- con since 2009 and am very happy in what I do.” About roller derby “About a year ago a friend told me that she had joined a roller derby team.It’s a full contact sport on roller skates,and it’s just girls playing.I follo- wed along and gave it a try and became hooked and bought skates from a girl there immedia- tely.The adrenaline rush,the game and the feeling of going really fast is addictive.” What I’ve learnt from roller derby “For me,roller derby has been a great way to switch off from my job - a good complement to the daily grind at work.I also benefit at work from meeting many different kinds of people at roller derby.And as I’m a project manager at work,I think it’s inte- resting to go in and see how projects are run in an association where everyone works as a volunteer.There are many similarities with my job but at the same time it’s completely different.” ABOUT: ROLLER DERBY Roller derby is a full-contact sport played on old-fashioned roller skates.The sport develo- ped in the USA in the 1920s and in recent years has spread as an underground movement to many countries over the world. Roller derby is based on five players on each team on an oval indoor track trying to win points through one player,the “jammer”,trying to run around the opposition,called“blockers”. + HOWKATHERINE KUCHENBECKERWANTS TOFOOLOURSENSES POWERPAC –AREVOLUTION INFUELCELLS KENTUCKYMAKES ASSAABLOY’SELECTRONIC KEYSCHEAPER A MAGAZINE ABOUT THE ART OF CREATING THE FUTURE #3 2013 THE GOLDEN YEARS TOMORROW’S 60-YEAR-OLDS WILL BE STRONGER BOTH PHYSICALLY AND FINANCIALLY. HOW DOES THIS AFFECT SOCIETY – AND HOW CAN WE PREPARE?

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