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Apr 5 07 courier

  1. 1. 4/5/2007 12:46 Page 1 PG 1 COLOR Home of the Atlantic Fleet Seabees Gulfport, Mississippi Vol. 44 No. 7 PG 24 COLOR April 5, 2007 inside this edition Detail X-Ray is a new Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seventy Four detachment formed to carry out highly specialized missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. See page 4 April 5, 2007 Col. John Alexander, Commander Army Support Group-Kuwait and Col. Kenneth Beard, ASG-KU, Commander Zone Six, officially open the MWR Stage in Camp Arifjan, Kuwait which was constructed by Seabees from three different battalions. See page 9 Seabee Courier Boy Scouts from several South Miss. troops arrived onboard NCBC March 17, armed with shovels, mulch and several species of trees which they planted in locations throughout the Seabee Center. Photo by MC1 Nicholas Lingo See page 11 http://cbcgulfport.navy.mil Five servicemembers stationed at Camp Moreell, Kuwait attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Thirty Three were awarded the Army Commendation Medal for their efforts in providing emergency medical assistance to a large number of civilian workers who were severely injured in an automobile accident. Pictured left to right, Gunnery Sgt. Tom McCarty, HM1 Charlotte Bethea, UT2 Kelly Caponigro, BU2 Tyler Morgan and BUCN Nicholas Condon. Presenting the awards is Colonel John S. Alexander, Area Support Group – Kuwait, Commander. See page 8 24 CB PG 01-24 COLOR Courier5 April.qxd
  2. 2. Page 2 PG 2 B&W CLEAN NCBC/20SRG Commanding Officer Capt. Van Dobson Executive Officer Cmdr. Bill Finn Public Affairs Officer Jean Remley Editor Bonnie L. McGerr Mass Comm. Specialist MC1 Sean Mulligan 22ND NCR Commander Capt. Eric Odderstol Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Kyra Hawn NMCB ONE Commanding Officer Cmdr. Dean A. Tufts Public Affairs Officer Lt.j.g. Chris Casne Mass. Comm. Specialists MC2 Chad Runge MC2 Demetrius Kennon MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB SEVEN Commanding Officer Cmdr. David J. Sasek Public Affairs Officer Ensign Russell Becker Mass Comm. Specialists MCC Jeffrey J. Pierce MC3 Paul D. Williams NMCB SEVENTY FOUR Commanding Officer Cmdr. Craig S. Prather Public Affairs Officer Lt. Edsil L. Logan Mass Comm. Specialist MC2 Gregory N. Juday NMCB ONE THIRTY THREE Commanding Officer Cmdr. Allan Stratman Public Affairs Officer Lt.j.g. Riley Smith Mass Comm. Specialists MC1 Nicholas Lingo MC3 Jessica A. McIver PG 23 B&W Gulf Coast community leader celebrates Women's History Month with Seabees By Jean Remley NCBC Public Affairs Officer This year marks the 20th anniversary of Women's History Month and on March 27 Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport held its celebration in honor of this federal program. Capt. Van Dobson welcomed the guests to the program with a few facts about Women's History Month. NCBC held their first Federal Women's Day program in 1973, fourteen years before Congress established Women's History Month, which makes the Seabee Center a trailblazer in recognizing the strong roles women occupy in the federal government. Harrison County District Five Supervisor, Connie Rockco was the guest speaker. In 2002, Rockco was elected as District Five Supervisor after capturing 78 percent of the votes. She stated she leads by example in her effort to revitalize and streamline Harrison County. Her leadership style led to her selection as the first female President of the Harrison County Board of Supervisors and in the state of Mississippi. During her remarks, Supervisor Rockco had warm words of praise for the Seabees and said that their Hurricane Katrina help was very much appreciated by the Gulf Coast. Ms. Rockco also acknowledged the women who served in the Civil War, World War I, and World War II. "In the home front or on the front lines, women are there," said Rockco, "Women in history have had a passion to change. They [women] have come a long way – moving in a different way then past generations." Ms. Rockco summed up the essence of her speech by simply stating, "It takes a team and a team is made up of men and women." At the conclusion of the formal portion of the celebration, light refreshments were served in the drill hall. The celebration was sponsored by the NCBC Diversity Committee. If you are interested in serving on the committee, contact BU1 Nick Hoffmann, 871-2144. Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan AGC (SW) Michael J. Bradley received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Natural Science and Mathematics from Thomas A. Edison State College after 21 years of active service thanks to the great help he received from Navy College Counselor Alex Carter. From Unity page 11 Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan Connie Rockco, Harrison County, Miss. District Five Supervisor addresses the audience as NCBC marks the 20th Annual Celebration of Women's History Month with a ceremony at the NOSC Drill Hall March 27. Breakfast with the Mayor NCTC Gulfport Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Darius Banaji Public Affairs Officer BU1(SCW) James LePage 2 The Seabee Courier is an authorized publication for members of the military services and their families. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the DoD or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in this newspaper, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U. S. Government, DoD, the Navy, NCBC Gulfport or Gulf Publishing Company of the products and services advertised. All content in this newspaper shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other nonmerit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The Seabee Courier is published 22 weeks a year by Gulf Publishing Company, a private firm in no way connected with the DoD , under an exclusive contract with the U. S. Navy. The Seabee Courier solicits news contributions from military and civilian sources, but the Public Affairs staff reserves the right to edit and/or rewrite material selected for publication to conform with journalism standards. The deadline for material is close of business Wednesday the week prior to publication. Your comments are always welcome. The Seabee Courier office is in Building 60, Room 250. The mailing address is 4902 Marvin Shields Blvd., Code 15, Gulfport, MS 39501. Phone: 228 871-3662, Fax: 228 871-2389. Email: seabeecourier@navy.mil. Academic Achievement ABC's, Primary Survey, direct pressure to the wounds; Lt. Harrison called for IV's to be placed, oxygen by non-rebreather, chest X-ray, medications, etc. The troops sprung into action quickly, agilely rushing through the crowd to reappear quickly with supplies in-hand. And so it went, patient after patient, small, quickly self-assembled teams of medical and non-medical professionals identifying surgical patients and providing stabilizing care to the dozens of unfortunate victims. The translator never left Lt. Harrison's side; providing the critical link of communication with the patients until all were provided the proper care or air-lifted to a higher echelon of care. At the end of that long day, 58 Iraqi casualties from the blast were treated at "Charlie-Med." Medical personnel from NMCB 74, 501st Army Medical Company, attached Navy Surgical team members, physicians and medics from the Army's 1st Artillery Division Task Force 1-37, Navy Corpsmen attached to the 1-6 Marines, native translators, as well as countless troops from many different units, all worked together to help our fellow humans. There were no inter-service politics that day, no pause given because the casualties weren't Coalition Forces, just peo- ple helping their fellow humans in need. The multitude of volunteers that appeared to help did so, not because they were required to, but because it was the right thing to do. "I'm proud to serve alongside my fellow dedicated service members from all branches of the military contributing to the struggle to win the hearts and minds of Iraqis by showing compassion and care to the injured," Lt. Harrison said. On that cold, January morning, like so many times before and since, there was unity amidst the chaos; professionals from all branches of the military working as one team to provide the best medical care possible to those in need. SAVI Training Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan Gulfport Mayor Brent Warr welcomes Chamber members to Breakfast with the Mayor hosted by NCBC, Gulfport in Colmer Galley on March 21. The mayor spoke of ongoing improvements to Gulfport while the crowd of 93 enjoyed their meal. Command Action Line Because of limited IG resources throughout the Southeast Region, all Fraud, Waste and Abuse hotline work will now be handled by the Region. To report Fraud, Waste and Abuse, contact the Region at: Toll Free 1-877-657-9851 Comm: (904) 542-4979 DSN 942-4979 FAX: (904) 542-5587 E-mail: CNRSE_HOTLINE@navy.mil An Initial Command SAVI Victim Advocate class is scheduled for April 16 - 19 at the FFSC, NCBC Gulfport. If you are interested in attending, contact Peggy Cuevas 8713000, X7428 for an interview and return completed necessary paperwork prior to March 29. The class is limited to 25 participants, so please register early. The Naval Officers Spouses Club presents SELF DEFENSE TRAINING with instructor Derek Pruitt of South Coast Martial Arts, along with guest speaker Peggy Cuevas, Sexual Assault Rights Coordinator April 21, 9 a.m. in the Bubble Gym - Cost $5 registration fee 100 Percent of proceeds will benefit the Gulf Coast Women's Center for Nonviolence Purchase tickets at the Fleet & Family Support Center or call Beverly Conrad, 871-3000 Dress comfortably - light refreshments will be served No One Under the age of 12 will be admitted to the gym for safety reasons 23 CB PG 02-23 12:47 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  3. 3. Courier5 April.qxd 4/5/2007 12:48 Page 3 3 COLOR CLEAN 22 COLORClassified Groundbreaking ceremony marks formal kick-off of Katrina Recapitalization Program Rain falls on the city and soon the clouds give way to clear skies. Clear skies, but polluted water. Trash, sediment, yard debris, vehicle fluids, pet waste, fertilizers and pesticides have been picked up by the rain runoff and are transported to local streams, creeks, and groundwater. No matter where we live in Mississippi our daily activities contribute to polluted runoff. In fact, most water pollution in Mississippi comes from polluted runoff, not from wastewater discharge pipes. When performing lawn maintenance, water and fertilize wisely and use pesticides only when absolutely necessary. Wash your vehicle with low-phosphate soap and keep suds out of gutters. Recycle crankcase oil. Always sweep walkways and driveways rather than hosing debris into storm drains. Protect our earth. Think Green! April 10, Mississippi Coast Coliseum & Convention Center 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. Job seekers, register at: www.VetsJobs.net Employers, register at: www.JobFairs.ms.gov Sponsor: The Military Order of the Purple Heart 22 CB PG 03-22 COLOR Provided by Gary Broom CBC Environmental Veterans Job Fair Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Seabee Courier 3 Rein in runoff Runoff pollution threatens water quality April 5, 2007 Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan Key stakeholders, including supported commanders and construction contract representatives, broke ground on March 16, 2007 for $124 million in combined construction projects at NCBC Gulfport. Pictured from left: Cmdr. Chris LaPlatney, OICC Katrina; Capt. Van Dobson, NCBC Commanding Officer; Ted Kennedy, BE&K Government Group; Roy Anderson III, Roy Anderson Corporation; Tim Culp, TJC Engineering; Lt. Cmdr. James Tannahill; METOC Executive Officer; and Cmdr. Darius Banaji, NCTC Commanding Officer. Construction for 13 military construction projects will begin between now and the end of May 2007. These projects represent nearly 40 percent of NCBC Gulfport's total Recapitalization Program and will create 1500 construction jobs in the local area over the next two years.
  4. 4. Courier5 April.qxd 4/5/2007 12:48 Page 4 PG 4 B&W No Higher than 4” across 5 columns 21 B&WChurch Page NMCB 74 'Bees create buzz with new Detachment A typical Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) deployment sends Seabees to various locations around the globe. Normally, these Bees will spend their six-month deployment in one geographic location honing their construction skills and developing as young leaders. Rarely do they get the chance to serve their country on multiple fronts during the same deployment. This uncommon opportunity arose for a few members of NMCB 74 when the Battalion was tasked to support a new classified mission three months into the deployment called Detail X-Ray. Photo by Lt.j.g. Chad Marshall EACR Jesse Bruenn crimps two panel sections of a Kspan together prior to lifting them with a crane for placement. April 5, 2007 April is the month of the Military Child Take your child to lunch at Colmer Galley April 6 Children's prices: E-4 and below: $3:15 E-5 and above: $3.65 Sponsored by the Colmer Dining Facility and Fleet and Family Support Center This highly energetic group is comprised of Fearless 74 Seabees brought together from all three of its primary deployment sites across two geographic areas of operations. The majority of the detail originally deployed to Guam and contributed to projects in support of Pacific Command. The remaining Seabees came from various parts of Southwest Asia where they supported the Marine Expeditionary Force or U.S. Special Operations Command. The journey of Detail XRay began in December for four motivated Seabees selected to venture back to the United States and complete specialized training needed to carry out the mission of the new detail. These valuable team members knew the impact of this training and responsibility that came with it. "We realized the importance of passing on what we learned to the other troops," stated BU1 (SCW) Erwin Hoffmann of Gulfport, Miss. With this initial training complete the rest of Detail X-Ray was ready to mobilize and get to work. The battalion utilized Camp Morrell in Kuwait as the arrival and assembly area. The Seabees from Guam began arriving at Kuwaiti International Airport in mid-January. For many of them, this was the first time they had flown through airports in foreign countries. Once all passengers from Guam had arrived, the Fearless Seabees from Iraq made their voyage back to Kuwait to join their Detail X-Ray comrades. The detail spent the next three weeks at Camp Morrell training for their upcoming mission and working on the team-building skills that would allow them to function flawlessly as one team. Upon completion of their training in Camp Morrell, these Seabees stepped on a plane destined for a Forward Operating Base in an undisclosed location in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Although the specifics of their mission are classified, each Seabee assigned to Detail X-Ray knows the value and importance of the work they are doing. "What I have experienced on this deployment has been exciting and fulfilling," said CECN Felton Randal, a native of Austin, Texas. "Being part of a project that will help in the efforts against the Global War on Terror means a lot to me and the other guys," he continued. These Seabees from NMCB 74 assigned to Detail X-Ray have demonstrated that even though we may leave homeport in separate groups bound for extremely different circumstances, we must always be prepared to come back together for a common goal. From the United States, Guam and Iraq to Kuwait and Afghanistan, we are always "One Command, One Team, One Family, Period." Seabee Days 2007 - May 4, 1 - 8 p.m. & May 5, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Displays! Music! Rock Climbing Wall! Car Show! Food! Crafts! Games! Tons of Fun for Everyone, Don't Miss It! (May 4, Special Day - Open to all Retired/Active Military & DoD personnel) May 5, Gulf Coast Community Day April 5, 2007 By Lt.j.g. Chad Marshall NMCB 74 Public Affairs 21 CB PG 04-21 4 Seabee Courier Seabee Courier Special Kids Menu!
  5. 5. Courier5 April.qxd 4/5/2007 12:48 Page 5 PG 5 Color Church Page 20 Color Gulf Coast USO NCBC Honors Fallen Shipmate 3001 6th Street, (Bldg 306), 228-575-5224 FREE SERVICES AVAILABLE Fax - Send & Receive (228-575-5225), Copies (limited amount) X-Box Snacks & Drinks, Information and Referral United through Reading Program Computers (4): with web cams, Internet Access, Email Access,Yahoo, Hotmail Office Hours: Monday – Friday 8a.m. - 5 p.m.Saturday 11 a.m. - 7 p.m., Closed on Sunday Photo by MC3 Ja'lon A. Rhinehart 5 20 CB PG 05-21 Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Friends and family mourn the loss of Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Jared D. Krutke of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seventy Four at a memorial ceremony held in the base chapel at Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, Miss., March 22, 2007.
  6. 6. Page 6 PG 6 B&W CLEAN NMCB 7 Seabee builds Long Beach playground Fort Leonard Wood Seabee selected as 2006 Joint Service NCO of the Year By EQCM(SCW) Tom Kirkle CSFE, Det Fort Leonard Wood April 5, 2007 Photo by MC3 Paul D. Williams EA2 (SCW/SW) Michael Urban from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seven hand mixes concrete for a 46' X 76' play area at the West Railroad Park in Long Beach, Miss. Petty Officer Urban took special liberty to volunteer his time and skills to the project. "I like to be involved in my community," Urban said. "I live in Long Beach and it will be a great place where my wife and I can take our four children to play." In addition to the West Railroad Park in Long Beach, Kaboom, with the help of over 3,000 volunteers, which included over sixty volunteers from NMCB 7, helped transform 10 playgrounds in seven Gulf Coast communities last August to mark the one year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Fleet & Family Support Center April Classes Seabee Courier Please call Fleet and Family Support Center at 871-3000 to preregister. Pre-registration is not required for FastTrack classes. 6 Anger Management, Tuesdays, 10 - noon Babysitting Class for Ages 11 & Up, April 6, 8 - noon Command Financial Specialist , April 23-27, 8 a.m. daily Consumer Awareness, April 19, 10 - 11 a.m. Credit Management, April 9, 10 - 11 a.m. Employment Workshop, April 13, 9 -11 a.m. Ind. Aug. Family Member Meeting, April 25, 4 - 5 p.m. Recovering Myself, Wednesdays 10 - 11 a.m. SAVI Advocate Inservice, April 24, 1030-noon SAVI Advocate Training, April 16-18, 8 a.m. daily SAVI Liaison, Data Collection Coord., April 30, 8 - noon Suicide Prevention, April 5, 9 - 10 a.m. Transition Assistance Program, April 2-6, 8 a.m. daily PG 19 B&W 2 Col. Cln On March 9, 2007, Builder First Class Jeffrey E. Owens, assigned to the Center for Seabees and Facilities Engineering (CSFE), Detachment Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, was selected as the Fort Leonard Wood Joint Service NonCommissioned Officer of the Year. Major General William McCoy, Jr., the Commanding General of Fort Leonard Wood, awarded the Army Commendation Medal to Owens for his exemplary performance before the Joint Service NCO board. Petty Officer Owens, a native of nearby Lebanon, Missouri, is the first Sailor to win this recognition since the Navy Detachment was established in 1995. Petty Officer Owens had previously competed against Soldiers, Airmen, and Marines to win the first quarter 2006 Joint Service NCO board. To compete, a service member must be recommended by his or her chain of command and had been selected as their respective service's quarterly board winner. During these challenging boards service members are asked military related questions related to flags and honors, leadership, military justice, first aid, chemical and biological warfare, current events, and the code of conduct. The boards are chaired by the Fort Leonard Wood Command Sergeant Major with Senior Enlisted Leaders from the other three service detachments as members. While assigned to CSFE Detachment Fort Leonard Wood, Petty Officer Owens has been an instructor for the Disaster Preparedness Operations Specialist course and is currently serving as a Sailor Development Continuum (SDC) Leading Petty Officer for the Engineering Aid and Equipment Operator "A" Schools. The SDC program provides basic military training and administrative support to "A" School students destined to be the Naval Construction Force's future Seabees. SDC leaders are handpicked for this challenging role and are expected to exhibit outstanding military bearing and knowledge. This Seabee has clearly exceeded these expectations. Fleet and Family Support Center's Jeff Isabell briefs Atlanta executives By FFSC, Gulfport Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Work and Family Life Specialist Jeff Isabell briefed the eleven-member Military Advisory Team Meeting of the Southern Company in Atlanta, Georgia on Friday, March 23. His 90-minute presentation on the Transition Assistance Program (TAP) and the Family Employment Readiness Program (FERP) covered the military transition process, military rates and how they translate into civilian jobs, and best strategies for announcing job vacancies to both mili- tary spouses and to service members making the transition to civilian life. Mr. Isabell was invited by the Southern Company because of its ongoing interest in hiring military spouses and former military personnel. "Southern Company has traditionally been a strong employer of our spouses, separatees, and retirees," said Mr. Isabell. "Speaking to this forum promoted even more visibility for our customers." Southern Company employs 26,000 personnel who provide electrical service to four million customers in the Southeast. It is projected to have 12,000 job openings in the next Jeff Isabell three to five years. For more information about the TAP and FERP programs, contact Jeff Isabell at Fleet and Family Support Center, 871-3000. Safety habits are free. Have you picked up any lately? Seabee Community Notes NMCB 1 FRG We would like to invite all friends and family of NMCB 1 Seabees to join us on the first Thursday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the CBC Chapel in Fellowship Hall. Bring the kids, babysitting is available and free. The NMCB 1 FRG offers fun activities including movies, picnics, bonfires, holiday parties and lots more for the whole family. During homeport and during the deployment we are available to help support all of our NMCB 1 families and friends. If you have any questions please call the FRG President, Monica Ortega at (210) 421-7810 or email her at mluvsden@yahoo.com or Ombudsman, Kathy Thomas at 392-8464 or email seabeezac@bellsouth.net. We hope to see you there. NMCB 1 FRG also has a new website that will keep you up to date on what is happening within our military family. The new website is http://hub.cinchouse.com/n mcb1seabees. NMCB 133 FRG We would like to invite all friends and family members of NMCB 133 to join us on the first Wednesday of every month at 6:00 p.m. in the base chapel. We also do many activities such as holiday parties, fun trips, movie outings and more. During homeport we share in each others excitement and during deployments we lean on each other for support. We offer battalion information and welcome those with children, those without, wives, husbands and other loved ones. NMCB 7 FRG Come join our growing family. We are here to promote and grow social relationships and encourage interaction of spouses and family members during often trying and difficult times during the deployment of our NMCB 7 men and women. We have lots of fundraisers and activities planned for the whole family. There are games and crafts for the kids and speakers on different topics for the adults. We will also have drawdowns for door prizes and refreshments each month. We meet the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck dinner at the start. Come and get together with us and meet your fellow family members. For more information on NMCB 7's FRG, contact Kathleen Whisenhunt, FRG president at kwhisenhunt@gmail.com. You can also check out nmcb7fsg@cinchouse.com and http://hub.cinchouse.com/nmcb7 fsg/for more information. NMCB 74 FRG The NMCB 74 Family Readiness Group welcomes friends and families of NMCB 74 personnel. We encourage and promote friendly and sympathetic relationships among our family members. We have a new Careline number for battalion updates, it is 1-866-531-1101 (toll free), or 871-3650 (local). Family Readiness Group meetings are held every third Monday of the month at the CBC Chapel in Fellowship Hall at 6:30 p.m. Free baby-sitting and activities for the children are provided. For information contact FRG President, Helen Walker at (228) 586-0114; or Secretary, Robyn Baca at (228) 539-9059. The FRG Advisor is Susan Prather, (228) 392-5945. NCTC TRI-SERVICE FRG We invite all spouses and loved ones of NCTC to join us on the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30pm in the Fellowship Hall of CBC Chapel. We are offering fun activities for the family, girls night out, and fellowship among the NCTC Command. For more information, please contact our FRG President Tessa Grimes @ 8654364 or email her at tgrimes730@hotmail.com. Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Thrift Shop is located at the far north end of McKinney Ave, Building 16. The Thrift Shop is staffed entirely by volunteers. The retail hours of operation are Monday - Thursday, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. and Friday, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. New volunteers are always welcome. Visit the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society offices at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Building 30, Suite 103, or call (228) 871-2610 to obtain information about becoming a part of the NMCRS volunteer team! Childcare and mileage are reimbursed. Mississippi Gulf Coast First Class Association MGCFCA is seeking new members. Meetings are every Weds at 2 p.m at CBC's Beehive, Bldg. 352. Call BU1 Reyes or CE1 Johnson at 871-2145 for more information. VFW Post 3937 VFW Post 3937 Long Beach is open every Friday from 6 - 8 p.m. for a seafood, steak, of pork chop dinner. Weekend breakfasts are served from 7 10 a.m. on Saturday and from 9 - noon on Sunday. VFW meetings are held the 2nd Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. New members are always welcome. Point of contact for more information is Post Commander, Mike Hanko at 228 863-8602. Retired Activities Office The Retired Activities Office (RAO) is located in the Fleet and Family Support Center and staffed entirely by volunteers for the retired military community. A wide range of services are offered to retirees and surviving spouses of military members that includes pay issues, the Survivor Benefit Program, and dealing with the Department of Veterans Affairs to obtain benefits. RAO volunteers act as a liaison to guide the customer through all aspects of the above programs. RAO's services are free and intended to assist the customer to obtain their entitled rights, benefits, and privileges as a retiree, dependent, or survivor of a military service member. Customers from other RAO's are welcome to visit the NCBC, Gulfport Retired Activity Office. The hours of operation are Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. Call for an appointment at 871-3000 ext. 35 or just drop in. Customers and volunteers are welcome. Navy College Test Prep The Navy College Learning Center Facilitators have announced the spring schedule of test preparation classes. The two-week classes can be taken by those who want to prepare for the ASVAB, ACT, SAT, GED, or CLEP Exams. The class dates are April 9-19 and April 23 - May 3. To enroll, select dates, verify availability with the NCLC, submit a chit, and see your command career counselor to secure a slot. For additional information and reservations contact Anna or Bonnie in the Navy College Learning Center, located in Building 60 on the second deck, Room 234, call 871-2508, or send an email to: gulfportnclc@plato.com. 1st Annual VFW District 1 Golf Tournament VFW District 1 will hold a golf tournament at Great Southern Club on April 14. Lineup is a 4-person scramble, 8 a.m. shotgun start. Deadline for sign up is April 1. Contact Rick (228) 818-9404 or Pete (228) 324-5149 for information. COMPASS COMPASS is a team of trained seasoned military spouses mentoring other navy spouses. Classes are intimate and informative. Our 12 hour3 day course is offered the last week of the month(Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday)from 9am-1pm at the Chapel Fellowship Hall CBC Gulfport. The course AND child care are FREE! Please R.S.V.P. 228-871-3000 ext. 7444 Ask for COMPASS! New Colmer Dining Facility Hours Until further notice... Breakfast 5:45 - 8 a.m. Lunch 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Dinner 4:30 - 6 p.m. Both lines in the galley will run for breakfast, lunch, and dinner to enable our patrons to get food faster and easier. 19 CB PG 06-19 12:49 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  7. 7. Page 7 PG 7 B&W CLEAN PG 18 B&W 5X11.5 Aspiring for success Fearless Seabee earns fourth warfare qualification By MC2 Gregory N. Juday NMCB 74 Public Affairs It is not uncommon for Seabees to study hard and dedicate their time to qualify as a Seabee Combat Warfare Specialist during a deployment cycle or to possibly even work to earn their Fleet Marine Force qualification, but it is an extraordinary accomplishment for someone to earn four warfare qualifications during his or her 12-year career in the Navy. Hospital Corpsman 1st Class (Seabee Combat Warfare, Fleet Marine Force, Enlisted Surface Warfare, Air Warfare) Danny L. Hawkins Jr. of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 exhibits the pride and professionalism for which many young sailors strive. While he credits his parents' support and nurturing for his accomplishments, some of the credit is due to his own steadfast dedication and commitment to excellence. "I have never been one to seek out recognition," said Hawkins, "I started my career to make my parents proud but now I accomplish the things I do out of my own sense of pride." HM1 Hawkins' father retired from the Navy after 21 years of service, and has been an inspiration for Danny throughout his career. "I have always looked up to my father, and all he has accomplished throughout his career," said Hawkins, "now that I know I have made both of my parents proud, I now strive towards aspirations of my own. I know I will make something of myself in the Navy. One day I would like to serve as the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy." HM1 Hawkins earned his first two warfare devices onboard the USS Enterprise as an E-3 and earned the second two in a period of five months while deployed to Iraq with NMCB 74. "During my 22 years serving the Navy, HM1 Hawkins is the first person I have ever met or known with four warfare qualifications. Not only is this an awesome personal achievement, but it truly sends a strong message to all Sailors and Seabees that our skies have no limits. I am really proud of HM1 Hawkins and his family," remarked Commanding Officer Craig Prather. Petty Officer Hawkins' tour with NMCB 74 is coming to a close. He has accepted orders to Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fla. so he can be closer to his parents. He plans on moving down there and beginning his own family with his fiancé Chantel Babb and carry on the family tradition bestowed upon him by his father. Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Many Sailors returning from an Individual Augmentee (IA) assignment, such as the Middle East and Afghanistan, have a hard time readjusting to a normal life style and some even suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to physiological and psychological stressors experienced while deployed. Military members go through a series of health screenings before and after deployment to identify any mental or physical problems that may have been caused by their deployment and treatment is issued accordingly. However, until recently, the families of those deployed have had little in the way of education on what to expect from their spouse or parent after they return from the war zone. Commander, Navy Region Southeast's (CNRSE) family support program, in conjunction with a directive from the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mike Mullen, is ensuring that all bases implement an IA support group to help families after loved ones deploy. 7 Olivia O'Neal, the regional fleet and family support program coordinator for CNRSE as well as the working family life coordinator described how these programs will develop. "One of my responsibilities is being the individual augmentee point of contact," she said. "Here at CNRSE we've been working on the subject of IAs and reaching out to IA families for more than a year now. Many months ago, our installations began outreach programs to the families of IAs and we realized that we had a major obstacle which was identifying who the IA member and their families were." According to O'Neal, they have started to receive that information from the Expeditionary Combat Readiness Command (ECRC) based in Norfolk, Va. The ECRC has established a hotline, 1-877364-4302, for families of active duty and reserve Sailors who are deploying as IAs. They will provide information that will allow the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) to contact family members and offer services such as the IA support group, counseling, financial planning, etc. Lt. Cmdr. Shawn Oxendine, from CNRSE, who was deployed as an IA to Afghanistan for six months and returned last August, elaborated on some of the challenges she and her family faced while she was gone and after she got back. "Some of the problems we faced were based on my husband having to take over the role of mother as well as a father. I know he took good care of our daughter, but there were some things he didn't know how to handle," she said. "I also had to worry about them worrying about me because I wasn't always able to tell them what I was doing and wasn't always able to call." Oxendine continued on to talk about readjusting to normal life. "It was very difficult because when I got home I wanted to just take over everything, but before we got back they briefed us that we would have to let our families carry on in their routines and gradually readjust. I think it would be helpful if they had something on the family end about how to readjust when their spouse or parent get home." O'Neal and the FFSC are working hard to do just that. "We're now in the midst of incorporating as many spouses as we can into FFSC IA coordinator to make referrals for those who are having a particularly hard time and need more individual assistance. Some may need help with things such as parenting skills or just help going on From Poison page 14 Photo by MC2 Gregory Juday HM1 Danny L. Hawkins of NMCB 74 receives the Fleet Marine Force Device; his fourth warfare qualification during his 12-year Navy career. CNRSE implements family IA support program By MC2(SW/AW) Rebecca Kruck CNRSE From IA page 7 the IA support program. By March 23, all of our installations will be mandated by CNRSE to start a program targeted towards the families of IAs. We felt it necessary to designate a program for IA families because they are under different stressors than those who go on routine deployments on ships," she continued. Some of the installations under CNRSE, which covers a radius spanning from mid-Eastern Texas to South Carolina, also including Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have already began IA support programs. These programs, as well as those that will begin shortly, will introduce families to the services that the fleet and family support programs offer and educate families on PTSD, other stressors their spouse will experience overseas and help them prepare for the transition that will occur when they return home. "We provide the bases with guidance and suggestions and we'll be getting information back from them on how successful their groups have been," she said. "It will also be the responsibility of See IA page 17 always safe. Children will climb to reach medicines. 5. Do not take medications in front of small children and never refer to medications as candy. Many of the flavored over-the-counter medications contain high levels of alcohol and are especially attractive to children. Always buy alcoholfree products when possible. 6. Keep a bottle of syrup of ipecac in your house to induce vomiting – use it only when directed by the poison control center. 7. Keep cosmetics/beauty products out of the reach of children. Permanents, dyes, relaxers, perfumes, hairsprays, nail polishes, and polish removers are toxic. 8. Store cleaning products in high cabinets with safety latches. Never store them under the sink. 9. Keep gardening items (fertilizers, pesticides, etc.) From Cute page 14 monthly Budget for Baby Class given by Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Gulfport. Along with basic budget training and valuable resource information attendees receive a free "Junior Sea Bag" and layette. The "Junior Sea Bag" is a From Retire page 15 England; chief of the merchandising branch and later chief of the operations division for DeCA's European Region, Kapaun Air Station, Germany; zone manager for Zone 29, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C.; and deputy director, Eastern Region, Virginia Beach, Va. Kanitz received numerous distinguished awards with their lives. Many of these families have spouses who haven't been married very long, have very young children and are at their first station away from home so they need someone to rely on. If they don't have that then people can quickly start falling apart." O'Neal also stated that the FFSC's will be working with MWR to assist with childcare to influence maximum participation. The concept of an IA children's support group has also been undertaken by FFSC and is already in in a locked area. 10. Be careful of using decorative lamps/candles containing lamp oils. Lamp oils can be extremely toxic if ingested. 11. Always read medication labels and dose instructions twice. Never give children medications intended for adult consumption or for which there is no child dose listed. Your pharmacist is an excellent resource for information on drugs and drug interactions. Always ask about effects and side effects before starting on a medication. 12. If you take vitamin supplements, be careful of interactions with over-thecounter and prescription drugs. Ask the pharmacist. Many have interactions with drugs that can be life threatening (ginkgo enhances the effects of the anticoagulant drug warfarin and may cause fatal bleeding). Remember, supplements are not regulated and have no good labels or warnings. Using supplements is "buyer beware." 13. Know which common household and yard plants may be toxic to children and animals. Several common plants found in homes can be toxic. These include dumb cane, caladiums, hydrangea, oleander, wisteria, holly, and mistletoe. Check with your garden shop or county extension office for more information. 14. Other common household items that pose a poisoning threat include adhesives/glues, arts/crafts/office supplies, batteries, deodorizers, polishes and waxes, and tobacco products. Using these simple precautions and other common sense care can prevent a poisoning tragedy at your home. Poison-proofing your home should be a priority for every parent. canvas tote loaded with brand new Gerber baby items that can help families get started on setting up their new nurseries. The layette is a delicately knitted or crocheted afghan and sweater set that have been made and donated by NMCRS Volunteers. According to Charlie Gibson, "Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Gulfport issued 74 free "Junior Sea Bags" in 2006 and would like to double that number in 2007. To register for or receive more information about the Budget for Baby Class, call 228-871-2601, and speak to a NMCRS representative. throughout her career, including Equal Employment Opportunity awards from the Air Force, DeCA and several states for her work in selective placement and leadership. In 2005, she received the American Logistics Association's annual Women in the Military Resale Industry Award. Kanitz said that while she feels honored to be DeCA's first female member of the Senior Executive Service, the accomplishment is a tribute to the agency's commissary career program, which offers and encourages career broadening assignments and recognizes individual accomplishments and achievements. "It's been a great career," she said, "and I encourage everyone to pursue their dreams because dreams do come true, albeit with a little hard work." place on some installations. O'Neal added one last statement regarding the importance of these support programs. "The emphasis on these support groups is coming straight from the CNO. He is adamant in seeing that these families are taken care of, and it falls upon our leadership to make it happen." 18 CB PG 07-18 12:49 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  8. 8. Page 9 PG16 B&W Clean PG 9 B&W Tragedy Turns NMCB 133 Trainers into Heroes By MC3 Jessica A. McIver NMCB 133 At approximately 5:30 on the morning of March 14, 2007, five members of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Thirty Three (NMCB 133) were en route to the Udari range in Kuwait for a training exercise when they came upon the scene of a horrific traffic accident. The accident, which involved two 20passenger vans and a fourdoor Nissan truck, happened only moments before the Seabees' arrival. "The accident occurred within just a few minutes as the air was still full of dust," said Gunnery Sgt. Tom McCarty, Military Advisor to NMCB 133. Led by McCarty, NMCB 133 personnel responded immediately with medical care and on-scene organization. McCarty proudly stated, "Everywhere you looked, One Thirty Three guys were there. They were cutting bandages, hooking up IV's and bringing in MEDEVAC choppers to get the seriously injured to the hospitals." While McCarty ensured emergency services were contacted, HM1 Charlotte Bethea immediately began assessing casualties and creating a Casualty Collection Point. With assistance from UT2 Kelly Caponigro, Bethea began bandaging the injured and administering intravenous fluids (IV) as needed. "I was helping Doc [Bethea] as best I could with bandages and helping cut clothing away from the injured. We were moving from body to body so fast, that I had to go back and retrieve supplies we may have left at the last [patient]. I was trying to stay busy so I couldn't react to what was truly going on," said Caponigro. The number of casualties was beyond the medical supply capabilities of the five responders, but as Seabees "Can-Do," they adapted to the situation, and assisted as best they could. Bethea recalls how appreciative the injured were of her efforts. "I remember one of the men saying, 'Thank you, Soldier, thank you, Soldier.' Even with my lack of supplies, he was thankful that I was doing what I could for him," said Bethea. When McCarty discovered two men pinned beneath one of the passenger vans, he worked with BU2 Tyler Morgan and BUCN Nicholas Condon to rescue the men. Overcoming the language barrier, the rescuers successfully organized the uninjured survivors to lift the van, thus allowing Morgan, Condon and McCarty to pull the two severely injured men to safety. Once the victims were clear of the wreckage, Bethea and Caponigro immediately began applying bandages and tourniquets. At this point, a third victim was discovered trapped inside the overturned van. After McCarty found that he could not safely move the victim through the front window of the van, Morgan and Condon smashed the rear window, crawled in, and carried the third man from the vehicle. As the sun rose, a Nissan truck was discovered a short distance away with seven men still trapped inside. By this point, 20-30 civilians arrived on the scene and endeavored to assist the rescuers in freeing the men from the truck. McCarty found a steel pipe and unsuccessfully attempted to lever apart the twisted wreck- Community Calendar April 2007 Sunday Monday Tuesday 2 8 Easter 9 Seabee Days 10 All Cmdr's Mtg, 11 Lunchtime Bible 12 Mtg, Bldg 1, 1 p.m. Bldg. 1, Conf. Study, Bldg 1 Conf. All Khaki Social, Room, 10 a.m. Room, 11:30 - 12:30 A&E, 3 p.m age. The men were eventually freed using the Jaws of Life. After a number of minutes with McCarty and the four Seabees as the only care providers on the scene, members of Camp Beuhring's Emergency Fire and Medical Rescue Team arrived. Even with the rescue team present, Bethea, Caponigro and McCarty continued to assist, directly treating the injured as 15 16 Federal Income 17 See Heroes page 15 22 Earth Day April 5, 2007 Friday Saturday 6 Holy Week/Easter Services, Chapel, Protestant, Noon Catholic, 3 p.m. 7 Month of Mil. 13 14 20 CBC Blood Drive, Chapel, 8 - 12:45 CPOA Car Wash, A&E, 11a.m. - 1 p.m. All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m Holy Week/Easter Services Chapel, Protestant, 5 p.m. Catholic 7 p.m. 21 Basewide Hail & Farewell, Sponsored by NMCB 7, A&E., CBC/20SRG PRT makeup Child Easter Egg Hunt/Carnival, 10 a.m. - Noon, Youth Center Sports Field Holy Week Easter Vigil, Chapel, Catholic, 7:30 p.m. 23 CNRSE Taxes due 18 Spring info 19 Fitness 5K run, 6:30 a.m. Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg 1 Conf. Room, 11:30 - 12:30 24 CNRSE 25 Lunchtime Bible 26 CNRSE 27 CNRSE 28 Hurricane Exercise Hurricane Exercise Study, Bldg 1 Conf. Hurricane Exercise Hurricane Exercise April 23 - May 4 April 23 - May 4 Room, 11:30 - 12:30 April 23 - May 4 April 23 - May 4 CNRSE Hurricane Exercise April 23 May 4 COMPASS Seabee Courier 5 CBC/20SRG PRT Compass Gulfport Spouse Teams Mentoring Spouses Make New Friends, Learn about the Navy lifestyle, Acquire Knowledge and Skills, Develop Realistic expectations and a positive attitude What is COMPASS? Spouse-to-Spouse Mentoring Program 12 Hour Session Presented Over Three Days Taught by Experienced Volunteer Navy Spouses Upcoming Sessions: The Course Curriculum Benefits and Services Anchors Aweigh April 24, 25, & 26 Local Insights 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Personal Finance Moving in the Navy Getting along with others Naval History and Traditions All Navy Spouses are welcome. 8 4 Thursday 1 Commissary closed Catholic Easter Mass, Chapel 9:30 a.m. ;Protestant Easter service, Chapel, 11 a.m. 3 Wednesday Need babysitting? Inquire during registration. From Heroes page 9 well as providing medical supplies to the Rescue Team. "When they [Rescue Team] showed up, they were kind of standing aside because they thought all of us were medics. This was because all our guys were so calm and collected. I was really proud of them," said McCarty. When the Rescue Team called in medical evacuation helicopters (MEDEVAC), Morgan stopped traffic before directing the MEDEVAC choppers to the landing zone. As the three helicopters flew in, Condon marked the landing area with signal flares. Upon MEDEVAC's arrival, One Thirty Three coordinated with the crew chiefs and rescue team to load nine of the most seriously injured victims into the helicopters. Numerous other victims were treated at the scene by the Seabees and the Buehring Rescue Team. In response to this tragedy, the members of One Thirty Three once again demonstrated the importance of their skills and training. Reflecting on Seabee readiness and the team effort so evident during the rescue, Bethea commented, "More than anything else, I am so proud of the Seabees that were there with me. They stepped up and did whatever was asked of them without a second thought or hesitation." To register call: (228) 871-3000, X 7444 Force Condition Awareness COMPASS will be held at CBC Chapel Fellowship Hall. For directions call: (228) 871-3000, X7444. Provided by NCBC Public Safety COMPASS is presented by experienced Navy spouses. The Naval Construction Battalion Center commanding officer can authorize the elevation of Force Protection Conditions locally. The Crisis Management Team determines the nature and extent of threats and makes recommendations to the commanding officer. Plans are evaluated for implementing higher Force Protection Conditions. All personnel are reminded to report all suspicious or unusual incidents to NCBC Security at X2361. 16 CB PG 09-16 12:49 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  9. 9. Page 10 PG 10 Color NMCB 1 earns spot on Navy's Retention Honor Roll 'Bees build stage for MWR Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 By MC3 Jessica A. McIver NMCB 133 Public Affairs 9 The Seabees of Naval Mobile Construction Battalions (NMCB) Twenty Six and One Thirty Three completed construction on a Morale, Welfare and Recreation stage which was constructed for use as an entertaining venue for the Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, and Airmen stationed on the Camp. The Buffalo Bills' cheerleaders opened the stage at the ribbon-cutting ceremony this week. The stage has also featured such names as actor/comedian Jamie Kennedy and rapper Paul Wall during Jamie Kennedy's Hip Hop Comedy Tour. NMCB 5 began the project in late January. NMCB 26 took the lead in early February upon their departure. In a joint effort, 133 helped tackle its completion. The project was completed 11 days earlier than the projected deadline. The stage was an important project for the crew, as well as the troops stationed at Arifjan. BU1 Steve Hansen (NMCB 26), comments on the contribution the stage will make to the welfare of the camp. "The project is important because it allows Arifjan to get some higher priority shows, which helps with the troops' morale," said Hansen. Constructed near the community center, the stage affected morale before construction began, according to Colonel Kenneth Beard, Commander, Zone Six at Camp Arifjan, who spoke at the opening ceremony. "It was a fishbowl project," said Beard. "The troops got to see it change almost daily." The 'Bees stand ready to put their skill sets to use in order to improve the quality of life all over the See Stage page 14 PG 15 color 4TH ANNUAL SEABEE DAYS CAR, TRUCK & MOTORCYCLE SHOW Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, MS 39501 Show will be in the Base Theater parking lot to the Navy Exchange---RAIN OR SHINE next ENTER THROUGH THE PASS ROAD GATE- MUST HAVE ID AND PROOF OF INSURANCE Saturday May 5, 2007 Open to All Military & Civilians OVER 30 CLASSES FOR SHOW ANTIQUE(VINTAGE), IMPORT, DOMESTIC AND FORE IGN CLASSES—WE HAVE A CLASS FOR EVERYONE KANDYLAND KUSTOMS IS DONATING A CUSTOM PAINT JOB TO A LUCK PARTICIPANT! LAND KUSTOMS CUSTOM P LUCKY P !!!!BEST OF SHOW, BEST INTERIOR, BEST E NGINE & CLUB PARTICIPATION TROPHIES!!!! $$$$$$$$$$$THOUSANDS IN PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS FROM LOCAL SPONSORS $$$$$$$$$$$ COME OUT AND HELP SUPPORT THE SEABEE BALL! 1ST AND 2ND place Trophies will be awarded in all Mild & Wild Categories 7:00 am-11:00 am Registration 11:00 am-1:00 pm Judging 2:00 pm Award Presentation **GULFPORT DRAGWAY & T Y TIRE KINGDOM IS SPONSORING A $10 BURNOUT CONTEST AT THE SHOW!** SH SPL CONTEST: SPONSORED BY SOUND SOLUTIONS--$20--1ST, 2ND & 3RD PLACE For questions contact: David Fulcher (228)365-1611 or Brian Harrison (228)343-9891 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------DELTA WORLD TIRE O’REILLY’S AUTO PARTS HARLEY DAVIDSON OF BILOXI AUTO ZONE ADVANCE AUTO FIRESTONE GOODYEAR COAST CYCLE WORLD GULF COAST RHINO LININGS SHOW SPONSORED BY: SOUND SOLUTIONS NA PA GULFPORT DRAGWAY DUNAWAY GLASS TOPPER WORLD 5 MINUTE OIL CHANGE KANDYLAND KUSTOMS SPEEDEE OI CHANGE L KLEIN MUFFLER SUZUKI CITY EMPRESS AUDIO HEADLINERS PLUS XTREME CONVERSIONS TIRE KINGDOM PRECISION GLASS TINTING RED ARROW CAR WASH Early Registration fee is $20. Must received by April 25th. be The registration fee the day the event will be $25. of ALL SPECTATORS ARE FREE!!! Pre-Registration Form: Mail to: Seabee Ball Committee, ATTENTION: Davi d Fulcher, P.O. Box 3641, Gulfport, MS 39505 Money Order Only Please! Name:________________________________________________________________________________________ Contact Number:________________________________________________________________________________ Vehicle Make and Model:_________________________________________________________________________ Vehicle Year:____________________________________ Club Name:____________________________________ By MC2 Chad Runge NMCB 1 Public Affairs Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One (NMCB 1) started the Fiscal Year off right by recently being named to the First Quarter All-Navy Retention Honor Roll. During the three month time period, NMCB 1 reenlisted 25 of its troops, who accumulated over $99,000 in selective reenlistment bonuses. "We've had the benefit of a truly engaged chain of command," said NCC (SW) Jake Brady, NMCB 1's Command Career Counselor. "That plays a huge role in having a better informed battalion." Chief Brady hasn't done it alone however. "Our 29-person Career Development Team fully engages with each and every person in the Battalion," he added. "One person cannot raise retention, but a great chain of command can." NMCB 1 is currently on pace to repeat their achievement for the next quarter. Kanitz to retire from DeCA in August By Rick Brink, richard.brink@deca.mil Bonnie Kanitz, director of DeCA East and the first woman in DeCA appointed to the Senior Executive Service, will retire from federal service in August. Kanitz, whose career spans 32 years, leaves a legacy as a pioneer not only for women in the federal workforce, but for anyone who strives for excellence on the job, said Patrick B. Nixon, DeCA's director and chief executive officer. "I've watched Bonnie move up the leadership chain during our years together at DeCA, and I can't think of a more dedicated leader who delivered results that improved the commissary benefit wherever she served. She accomplished some significant 'firsts' as a woman in the workforce and her work ethic, determination, leadership and concern for the commissary benefit are great examples for everyone to follow. She'll be missed, but she's going on to a well-deserved retirement and we all wish her the best," Nixon said. Kanitz said she plans to return to Michigan where she grew up and her family lives. She made agency history "Ms. Kanitz will truly be missed by all in DeCA. She is a grass roots manager that cares greatly, not only for those that work for her, but also for our military members and their families that we are here to support. She left her personal mark at Gulfport while visiting in early September 2001, by initiating the placement of a deli in the store, a step that has been realized and enjoyed by our patrons since we reopened following Katrina in May, 2006. I hate to see her go, but wish her the best for an enjoyable and long retirement!" Walt Taylor, Store Director Gulfport NCBC Commissary in February 2002 when she became the first woman in DeCA to become a Senior Executive Service member and lead a region – the former Midwest Region. She went on to lead DeCA's European Region during the startup of Operation Iraqi Freedom before taking the reins of DeCA East in July 2004. "It's been a privilege to be part of providing such a great benefit to the deserving men and women of our nation's military – the best in the world. I've always had a great passion for this benefit and for our stores, where commitment, dedication and selflessness is overwhelming. There are so many in our stores who do more than asked, who are heroes in going the extra mile to add to the quality of life for our military and their families. I'm extremely proud to have been a part of it all and privileged to be their leader! I'll miss the people in DeCA and industry partners I've worked with over the years – many have become my friends – but I know the great work will continue and the benefit will only get stronger because of the dedication people have for it," Kanitz said. Kanitz is known as an approachable, engaged leader who especially relished visits to commissaries where she was quick to share insights for success and seek employee and customer input on how to improve the commissary benefit. She knows what it takes to run a commissary. Her career began in 1975 when she became the store manager at Calumet Radar Site, Mich., after earning her bachelor's degree from Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mich. She was selected into the first four-year intern class in the Air Force Commissary Service in 1979 and received an early placement after her first year of intern training. She went on to earn a master's degree in management and served as a store director in over seven commissaries in the United States and Europe. While store director at the Peterson Air Force Base Commissary, Colo., in 1985, the store took best commissary and best overall commissary awards, and she received the Air Force Senior Civilian Service Manager of the Year Award while there. Over the years, she served as operations division director for the AFCOMS' United Kingdom Complex, RAF Lakenheath, See Retire page 18 15 CB PG 10-15 COLOR 12:49 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  10. 10. Page 11 PG14B&W PG 11 B&W Unity amidst chaos: Teamwork essential in crisis Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 By Lt. James Harrison Medical Officer, NMCB 74 10 A garbled message pierced the cold, dusty air over the din of noisy tank engines and helicopter blades churning overhead. "All medical personnel and litter bearers please report to Charlie Medical immediately." The message repeated over and over from Camp Ramadi's public address system, as those who recognized the call sprung into action. One of Fearless 74's Independent Duty Corpsmen, HM1 Richard Poole, and Medical Officer, Lt. James Harrison rushed to their HUMMVEE ambulance and rumbled down the dusty, crater-filled road; making their way across Camp Ramadi to arrive on a scene so frequently played out at bases throughout the Al Anbar province of Iraq. Crowds of people were amassed in a dusty parking lot; dozens of field stretchers erected and occupied, everyone moving with urgency and a purpose. Scores of injured cried out in Arabic; and their cries fell on the ears of the understanding medical community. While very few understood the words, everyone understood the meaning… "Please help me, I'm hurting." Lt. Harrison asked the first person he approached, "Quickly, what happened?" The person's reply spoke volumes, "Suicide vehicle borne IED (Improvised Explosive Device)—dump truck." The civilian casualties had been brought to Charlie Medical Company housed in a facility resembling an abandoned block warehouse building you might pass by in the States. However, inside this flatroofed one-story structure held the best chance for Iraqis and Coalition Forces alike to receive life-saving medical care in the Al Anbar province. There were so many injured, for a moment it was hard to know where to start, but a quick survey of the scene showed most had been triaged already and separated accordingly. HM1 Poole and Lt. Harrison immediately made their way toward the priority category where scores lay wounded with just a handful of medics attending them. Lt. Harrison began assessing the first patient and found a young man, who appeared to be in his thirties, with numerous shrapnel wounds covering his body. Lt. Harrison began to talk to him, but his words didn't register. Suddenly, a thin man of Arabic descent and eager eyes appeared at his side. "Doctor?" he asked. Lt. Harrison acknowledged, "Yes." The Arabic man who was a translator, began assisting Lt. Harrison in assessing the patient. Several unfamiliar faces of uniformed soldiers, sailors and Marines began to appear around the man as they conducted their exam. See Unity page 20 What's under your kitchen sink? From Stage page 10 Provided by NCBC Safety Kuwaiti are of operation. The Seabees have made many improvements on and off base, said Beard. "Seabees' skills, abilities, and equipment have been used for almost every part of base operations here at Arifjan, and throughout the Kuwaiti Theater of Operations," said Beard. The Seabees continue to Millions of poisoning exposures occur each year in the United States, resulting in nearly 900,000 visits to emergency rooms and approximately 21,183 fatalities. About 90 percent of poisonings happen in the home, and common household products are usually the cause. The poisons most often involved are cleaning products, pain relievers, cosmetics, personal care products, plants and cold/cough medications. Children – especially those under age six – are at the highest risk for unintentional poisonings. However, adolescents and adults contribute a significant portion of poisoning incidents. Many poisonings can be prevented if safety precautions are taken around the home. The precautions are easy to implement and may save the life of someone you love. 1. Post the toll-free poisoncontrol number (800-2221222), family physician's number, and parent's work numbers next to the phone. 2. Remove all non-essential drugs and household products from your home. 3. Avoid keeping highly toxic products, such as drain cleaners, metal polishes, oven cleaners, in an area where children can access them. Substitute less toxic products when possible. Store these items in lockable areas. Use safety latches on cabinets. 4. Buy medicines and household products in child-resistant packaging and be sure that caps are on tightly. Keep these items in a locked area. Keeping them in high areas isn't make their mark in their contribution to the war on terrorism. "They have always been a part, often the first part, of many efforts to defeat terrorism," said Beard. "The association with the Seabee elements here in Zone Six will be one that I will take away from this deployment as one of my highest honors." BUCKLE UP EVERY TIME YOU GET INTO A VEHICLE... IT'S A HABIT YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO BREAK! See Poison page 18 Cute! Cuddly! Costly! NMCRS Class helps parents plan for new expenses By Alice Huffman NMCRS Official U.S. Navy photo Members of NMCB 74's medical team provide treatment to a 4-year-old Iraqi child (center). Left to right are team members: HM1 Danny Hawkins, Lt. James Harrison, HM3 Jaclyn Place and HM1 Richard Poole. No one will argue that babies are cute and cuddly. Their chubby faces, cooing sounds and innocence can't help but make us smile. It's the cost of raising them that shocks us and without proper planning can throw a family into a financial tailspin. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Budget for Baby Class teaches expectant parents that they should be financially prepared and plan for the upcoming birth of a new baby along with the added costs to the household that can be anticipated. Charlie and Betty Gibson, NMCRS Volunteers, teach the local Budget for Baby Class and state that, "the main component of the free two-hour course is teaching expectant parents general budgeting tips." The most common mistake expectant parents make is going financially overboard when they are setting up their home for the arrival of a new baby. Charlie and Betty cover the importance of planning for the added expenses of preparing for the new baby and recommend purchasing secondhand items such as cribs, high chairs, and baby clothing. Secondhand items can cut the setup costs almost in half and most people will find that secondhand work just fine. Charlie and Betty also recommend that attendees keep a spending log for 30 days to track their miscellaneous expenses and obtain a better idea where loose change and "hole in the pocket" money is being spent. They warn attendees about being targeted by costly photography plans, children's book clubs or insurance scams for children. Charlie reminds parents that dependent children are covered, at no cost, under the Servicemen's Group Life Insurance. The only requirement is that the military service member be covered under the plan. Even parents expecting their second or third child can find benefits to attending the Budget for Baby Class. Although the addition of a second or third child may not be as costly or significant, household expenses can be expected to increase with the newest family member. All Navy and Marine Corps service members, active duty and retired, and their eligible family members can attend the See Cute page 18 14 CB PG 11-14 12:50 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  11. 11. Courier5 April.qxd 4/5/2007 12:51 Page 12 Pg12 Clean Clean Pg13 Boy Scout Spring Planting Seabee greets VIP on job site Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan 11 With the arrival of Spring, the Boy Scouts from South Mississippi came to help replant new life on the Seabee base in the form of 42 new trees. The trees were donated through the efforts of Judy Steckler using the Hurricane Katrina Grant Program. The grant program was set up by the U.S. Forestry Commission to help replace lost trees due to Hurricane Katrina. Mrs. Steckler who oversees the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain was instrumental in providing replacement trees. This is part of a partnership between Land Trust and the Sun Herald in an effort to "Replant South Mississippi". On Saturday morning, March 17 approximately 30 Boy Scouts and their Leaders came out to plant the trees. Retired Navy Capt. Frank DiGeorge, former commanding officer of NCBC Gulfport, along with the Public Works department helped organize and coordinate the replanting efforts. The Boy Scouts were represented by Troops 190, 205 and 209. Those who helped included: Paul Krass, Pat Gibson, Mike Young, Donna Gibson, Josh Crowe, Glen East, Steve Hymel and daughter, Dylon Cooke, Colby Cowart, Jon Hagwood, Brenden Phillips, Bryan Mogler, Calvin Perrone, Kane Keith, Patrick Stovall, Christian Hymel, and Kevin Peters. As with the Seabees, the Boy Scouts came out with the "Can Do" spirit and completed the task by hand. The trees were a variety of oaks and maples and can be seen in several locations around the base. I would like to give a special "thank you" to all who made this possible. NMCB One Corpsman train in Port Hueneme By Lt. Anthony O'Daniel, MD NMCB 1 Medical Officer Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One (NMCB 1) recently took advantage of training held by the First Naval Construction Division's (1 NCD) Medical Department in Port Hueneme, Calif. The course, designed for junior Corpsman, focused on Tactical Casualty Care and highlighted recent medical advances in the combat arena. NMCB 1 sent three Corpsmen to participate; HM1 Scott Gervasi, HM2 Shannon Rodriguez and HM2 Tiffany Little. In the future, this course will become the "gold standard" for all Field Medical Corpsmen. Topics covered during the four day conference included: movement of patients under hostile fire, hemorrhage control for injured warriors, and introduction to advanced medical equipment currently being used on the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. This course enabled the NMCB 1 Medical Department to have the most up-to-date information currently available to the Naval Mobile Construction Battalions. "Focused training like this is exactly what we need for our junior Corpsmen," said Lt. Anthony O'Daniel, M.D, NMCB 1's Battalion Medical Officer. "They need this training the most, because they are the ones that will be providing medical coverage for our Convoy Security Teams this fall." HMC Michael Haggerty added, "This training allows my Corpsmen to teach our Combat Life Savers the newest techniques and train them on the latest equipment. This training could potentially save lives when we deploy this October." Discussing this training opportunity, HM1 Gervasi said, "1 NCD did a great job of getting this vital training for our junior Corpsmen on the deck plates." In an effort to better prepare their Medical Department for the upcoming deployment, NMCB 1 Medical has scheduled numerous training events throughout the country for their key personnel. This proactive approach will pay huge dividends upon deployment. Photo by MC3 (SCW) Ja'lon Rhinehart HM2 Tiffany Little demonstrates how to use the new compression bandage that will be found in the Navy's first aid and first responders kits. April 5, 2007 By Ben P. Barker Public Works Dept., Gpt 13 CB PG 12-13 COLOR Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Photos by Bonnie McGerr Arbor Day Comes Early to Seabee Center Seabee Courier South Mississippi Boy Scouts planted trees at several locations onboard NCBC Gulfport. UT1 (SCW) John West met with Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour during his visit to the Kaboom playground build at West Railroad Park in Long Beach March 14, 2007. West was one of the Seabees to volunteer as a Team Leader for the project. The Long each Civic Club hosted 250 volunteers from across the country to participate in the build. The Gulf Coast First Class Association provided facilities to the volunteers for a makeshift galley and shelter.
  12. 12. Courier5 April.qxd 4/5/2007 12:51 Page 12 Pg12 Clean Clean Pg13 Boy Scout Spring Planting Seabee greets VIP on job site Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan 12 With the arrival of Spring, the Boy Scouts from South Mississippi came to help replant new life on the Seabee base in the form of 42 new trees. The trees were donated through the efforts of Judy Steckler using the Hurricane Katrina Grant Program. The grant program was set up by the U.S. Forestry Commission to help replace lost trees due to Hurricane Katrina. Mrs. Steckler who oversees the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain was instrumental in providing replacement trees. This is part of a partnership between Land Trust and the Sun Herald in an effort to "Replant South Mississippi". On Saturday morning, March 17 approximately 30 Boy Scouts and their Leaders came out to plant the trees. Retired Navy Capt. Frank DiGeorge, former commanding officer of NCBC Gulfport, along with the Public Works department helped organize and coordinate the replanting efforts. The Boy Scouts were represented by Troops 190, 205 and 209. Those who helped included: Paul Krass, Pat Gibson, Mike Young, Donna Gibson, Josh Crowe, Glen East, Steve Hymel and daughter, Dylon Cooke, Colby Cowart, Jon Hagwood, Brenden Phillips, Bryan Mogler, Calvin Perrone, Kane Keith, Patrick Stovall, Christian Hymel, and Kevin Peters. As with the Seabees, the Boy Scouts came out with the "Can Do" spirit and completed the task by hand. The trees were a variety of oaks and maples and can be seen in several locations around the base. I would like to give a special "thank you" to all who made this possible. NMCB One Corpsman train in Port Hueneme By Lt. Anthony O'Daniel, MD NMCB 1 Medical Officer Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One (NMCB 1) recently took advantage of training held by the First Naval Construction Division's (1 NCD) Medical Department in Port Hueneme, Calif. The course, designed for junior Corpsman, focused on Tactical Casualty Care and highlighted recent medical advances in the combat arena. NMCB 1 sent three Corpsmen to participate; HM1 Scott Gervasi, HM2 Shannon Rodriguez and HM2 Tiffany Little. In the future, this course will become the "gold standard" for all Field Medical Corpsmen. Topics covered during the four day conference included: movement of patients under hostile fire, hemorrhage control for injured warriors, and introduction to advanced medical equipment currently being used on the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. This course enabled the NMCB 1 Medical Department to have the most up-to-date information currently available to the Naval Mobile Construction Battalions. "Focused training like this is exactly what we need for our junior Corpsmen," said Lt. Anthony O'Daniel, M.D, NMCB 1's Battalion Medical Officer. "They need this training the most, because they are the ones that will be providing medical coverage for our Convoy Security Teams this fall." HMC Michael Haggerty added, "This training allows my Corpsmen to teach our Combat Life Savers the newest techniques and train them on the latest equipment. This training could potentially save lives when we deploy this October." Discussing this training opportunity, HM1 Gervasi said, "1 NCD did a great job of getting this vital training for our junior Corpsmen on the deck plates." In an effort to better prepare their Medical Department for the upcoming deployment, NMCB 1 Medical has scheduled numerous training events throughout the country for their key personnel. This proactive approach will pay huge dividends upon deployment. Photo by MC3 (SCW) Ja'lon Rhinehart HM2 Tiffany Little demonstrates how to use the new compression bandage that will be found in the Navy's first aid and first responders kits. April 5, 2007 By Ben P. Barker Public Works Dept., Gpt 12 CB PG 12-13 COLOR Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 Photos by Bonnie McGerr Arbor Day Comes Early to Seabee Center Seabee Courier South Mississippi Boy Scouts planted trees at several locations onboard NCBC Gulfport. UT1 (SCW) John West met with Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour during his visit to the Kaboom playground build at West Railroad Park in Long Beach March 14, 2007. West was one of the Seabees to volunteer as a Team Leader for the project. The Long each Civic Club hosted 250 volunteers from across the country to participate in the build. The Gulf Coast First Class Association provided facilities to the volunteers for a makeshift galley and shelter.
  13. 13. Page 11 PG14B&W PG 11 B&W Unity amidst chaos: Teamwork essential in crisis Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 By Lt. James Harrison Medical Officer, NMCB 74 11 A garbled message pierced the cold, dusty air over the din of noisy tank engines and helicopter blades churning overhead. "All medical personnel and litter bearers please report to Charlie Medical immediately." The message repeated over and over from Camp Ramadi's public address system, as those who recognized the call sprung into action. One of Fearless 74's Independent Duty Corpsmen, HM1 Richard Poole, and Medical Officer, Lt. James Harrison rushed to their HUMMVEE ambulance and rumbled down the dusty, crater-filled road; making their way across Camp Ramadi to arrive on a scene so frequently played out at bases throughout the Al Anbar province of Iraq. Crowds of people were amassed in a dusty parking lot; dozens of field stretchers erected and occupied, everyone moving with urgency and a purpose. Scores of injured cried out in Arabic; and their cries fell on the ears of the understanding medical community. While very few understood the words, everyone understood the meaning… "Please help me, I'm hurting." Lt. Harrison asked the first person he approached, "Quickly, what happened?" The person's reply spoke volumes, "Suicide vehicle borne IED (Improvised Explosive Device)—dump truck." The civilian casualties had been brought to Charlie Medical Company housed in a facility resembling an abandoned block warehouse building you might pass by in the States. However, inside this flatroofed one-story structure held the best chance for Iraqis and Coalition Forces alike to receive life-saving medical care in the Al Anbar province. There were so many injured, for a moment it was hard to know where to start, but a quick survey of the scene showed most had been triaged already and separated accordingly. HM1 Poole and Lt. Harrison immediately made their way toward the priority category where scores lay wounded with just a handful of medics attending them. Lt. Harrison began assessing the first patient and found a young man, who appeared to be in his thirties, with numerous shrapnel wounds covering his body. Lt. Harrison began to talk to him, but his words didn't register. Suddenly, a thin man of Arabic descent and eager eyes appeared at his side. "Doctor?" he asked. Lt. Harrison acknowledged, "Yes." The Arabic man who was a translator, began assisting Lt. Harrison in assessing the patient. Several unfamiliar faces of uniformed soldiers, sailors and Marines began to appear around the man as they conducted their exam. See Unity page 23 What's under your kitchen sink? From Stage page 10 Provided by NCBC Safety Kuwaiti are of operation. The Seabees have made many improvements on and off base, said Beard. "Seabees' skills, abilities, and equipment have been used for almost every part of base operations here at Arifjan, and throughout the Kuwaiti Theater of Operations," said Beard. The Seabees continue to Millions of poisoning exposures occur each year in the United States, resulting in nearly 900,000 visits to emergency rooms and approximately 21,183 fatalities. About 90 percent of poisonings happen in the home, and common household products are usually the cause. The poisons most often involved are cleaning products, pain relievers, cosmetics, personal care products, plants and cold/cough medications. Children – especially those under age six – are at the highest risk for unintentional poisonings. However, adolescents and adults contribute a significant portion of poisoning incidents. Many poisonings can be prevented if safety precautions are taken around the home. The precautions are easy to implement and may save the life of someone you love. 1. Post the toll-free poisoncontrol number (800-2221222), family physician's number, and parent's work numbers next to the phone. 2. Remove all non-essential drugs and household products from your home. 3. Avoid keeping highly toxic products, such as drain cleaners, metal polishes, oven cleaners, in an area where children can access them. Substitute less toxic products when possible. Store these items in lockable areas. Use safety latches on cabinets. 4. Buy medicines and household products in child-resistant packaging and be sure that caps are on tightly. Keep these items in a locked area. Keeping them in high areas isn't make their mark in their contribution to the war on terrorism. "They have always been a part, often the first part, of many efforts to defeat terrorism," said Beard. "The association with the Seabee elements here in Zone Six will be one that I will take away from this deployment as one of my highest honors." BUCKLE UP EVERY TIME YOU GET INTO A VEHICLE... IT'S A HABIT YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO BREAK! See Poison page 17 Cute! Cuddly! Costly! NMCRS Class helps parents plan for new expenses By Alice Huffman NMCRS Official U.S. Navy photo Members of NMCB 74's medical team provide treatment to a 4-year-old Iraqi child (center). Left to right are team members: HM1 Danny Hawkins, Lt. James Harrison, HM3 Jaclyn Place and HM1 Richard Poole. No one will argue that babies are cute and cuddly. Their chubby faces, cooing sounds and innocence can't help but make us smile. It's the cost of raising them that shocks us and without proper planning can throw a family into a financial tailspin. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Budget for Baby Class teaches expectant parents that they should be financially prepared and plan for the upcoming birth of a new baby along with the added costs to the household that can be anticipated. Charlie and Betty Gibson, NMCRS Volunteers, teach the local Budget for Baby Class and state that, "the main component of the free two-hour course is teaching expectant parents general budgeting tips." The most common mistake expectant parents make is going financially overboard when they are setting up their home for the arrival of a new baby. Charlie and Betty cover the importance of planning for the added expenses of preparing for the new baby and recommend purchasing secondhand items such as cribs, high chairs, and baby clothing. Secondhand items can cut the setup costs almost in half and most people will find that secondhand work just fine. Charlie and Betty also recommend that attendees keep a spending log for 30 days to track their miscellaneous expenses and obtain a better idea where loose change and "hole in the pocket" money is being spent. They warn attendees about being targeted by costly photography plans, children's book clubs or insurance scams for children. Charlie reminds parents that dependent children are covered, at no cost, under the Servicemen's Group Life Insurance. The only requirement is that the military service member be covered under the plan. Even parents expecting their second or third child can find benefits to attending the Budget for Baby Class. Although the addition of a second or third child may not be as costly or significant, household expenses can be expected to increase with the newest family member. All Navy and Marine Corps service members, active duty and retired, and their eligible family members can attend the See Cute page 17 13 CB PG 11-14 12:50 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  14. 14. Page 10 PG 10 Color NMCB 1 earns spot on Navy's Retention Honor Roll 'Bees build stage for MWR Seabee Courier April 5, 2007 By MC3 Jessica A. McIver NMCB 133 Public Affairs 10 The Seabees of Naval Mobile Construction Battalions (NMCB) Twenty Six and One Thirty Three completed construction on a Morale, Welfare and Recreation stage which was constructed for use as an entertaining venue for the Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, and Airmen stationed on the Camp. The Buffalo Bills' cheerleaders opened the stage at the ribbon-cutting ceremony this week. The stage has also featured such names as actor/comedian Jamie Kennedy and rapper Paul Wall during Jamie Kennedy's Hip Hop Comedy Tour. NMCB 5 began the project in late January. NMCB 26 took the lead in early February upon their departure. In a joint effort, 133 helped tackle its completion. The project was completed 11 days earlier than the projected deadline. The stage was an important project for the crew, as well as the troops stationed at Arifjan. BU1 Steve Hansen (NMCB 26), comments on the contribution the stage will make to the welfare of the camp. "The project is important because it allows Arifjan to get some higher priority shows, which helps with the troops' morale," said Hansen. Constructed near the community center, the stage affected morale before construction began, according to Colonel Kenneth Beard, Commander, Zone Six at Camp Arifjan, who spoke at the opening ceremony. "It was a fishbowl project," said Beard. "The troops got to see it change almost daily." The 'Bees stand ready to put their skill sets to use in order to improve the quality of life all over the See Stage page 14 PG 15 color 4TH ANNUAL SEABEE DAYS CAR, TRUCK & MOTORCYCLE SHOW Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, MS 39501 Show will be in the Base Theater parking lot to the Navy Exchange---RAIN OR SHINE next ENTER THROUGH THE PASS ROAD GATE- MUST HAVE ID AND PROOF OF INSURANCE Saturday May 5, 2007 Open to All Military & Civilians OVER 30 CLASSES FOR SHOW ANTIQUE(VINTAGE), IMPORT, DOMESTIC AND FORE IGN CLASSES—WE HAVE A CLASS FOR EVERYONE KANDYLAND KUSTOMS IS DONATING A CUSTOM PAINT JOB TO A LUCK PARTICIPANT! LAND KUSTOMS CUSTOM P LUCKY P !!!!BEST OF SHOW, BEST INTERIOR, BEST E NGINE & CLUB PARTICIPATION TROPHIES!!!! $$$$$$$$$$$THOUSANDS IN PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS FROM LOCAL SPONSORS $$$$$$$$$$$ COME OUT AND HELP SUPPORT THE SEABEE BALL! 1ST AND 2ND place Trophies will be awarded in all Mild & Wild Categories 7:00 am-11:00 am Registration 11:00 am-1:00 pm Judging 2:00 pm Award Presentation **GULFPORT DRAGWAY & T Y TIRE KINGDOM IS SPONSORING A $10 BURNOUT CONTEST AT THE SHOW!** SH SPL CONTEST: SPONSORED BY SOUND SOLUTIONS--$20--1ST, 2ND & 3RD PLACE For questions contact: David Fulcher (228)365-1611 or Brian Harrison (228)343-9891 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------DELTA WORLD TIRE O’REILLY’S AUTO PARTS HARLEY DAVIDSON OF BILOXI AUTO ZONE ADVANCE AUTO FIRESTONE GOODYEAR COAST CYCLE WORLD GULF COAST RHINO LININGS SHOW SPONSORED BY: SOUND SOLUTIONS NA PA GULFPORT DRAGWAY DUNAWAY GLASS TOPPER WORLD 5 MINUTE OIL CHANGE KANDYLAND KUSTOMS SPEEDEE OI CHANGE L KLEIN MUFFLER SUZUKI CITY EMPRESS AUDIO HEADLINERS PLUS XTREME CONVERSIONS TIRE KINGDOM PRECISION GLASS TINTING RED ARROW CAR WASH Early Registration fee is $20. Must received by April 25th. be The registration fee the day the event will be $25. of ALL SPECTATORS ARE FREE!!! Pre-Registration Form: Mail to: Seabee Ball Committee, ATTENTION: Davi d Fulcher, P.O. Box 3641, Gulfport, MS 39505 Money Order Only Please! Name:________________________________________________________________________________________ Contact Number:________________________________________________________________________________ Vehicle Make and Model:_________________________________________________________________________ Vehicle Year:____________________________________ Club Name:____________________________________ By MC2 Chad Runge NMCB 1 Public Affairs Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One (NMCB 1) started the Fiscal Year off right by recently being named to the First Quarter All-Navy Retention Honor Roll. During the three month time period, NMCB 1 reenlisted 25 of its troops, who accumulated over $99,000 in selective reenlistment bonuses. "We've had the benefit of a truly engaged chain of command," said NCC (SW) Jake Brady, NMCB 1's Command Career Counselor. "That plays a huge role in having a better informed battalion." Chief Brady hasn't done it alone however. "Our 29-person Career Development Team fully engages with each and every person in the Battalion," he added. "One person cannot raise retention, but a great chain of command can." NMCB 1 is currently on pace to repeat their achievement for the next quarter. Kanitz to retire from DeCA in August By Rick Brink, richard.brink@deca.mil Bonnie Kanitz, director of DeCA East and the first woman in DeCA appointed to the Senior Executive Service, will retire from federal service in August. Kanitz, whose career spans 32 years, leaves a legacy as a pioneer not only for women in the federal workforce, but for anyone who strives for excellence on the job, said Patrick B. Nixon, DeCA's director and chief executive officer. "I've watched Bonnie move up the leadership chain during our years together at DeCA, and I can't think of a more dedicated leader who delivered results that improved the commissary benefit wherever she served. She accomplished some significant 'firsts' as a woman in the workforce and her work ethic, determination, leadership and concern for the commissary benefit are great examples for everyone to follow. She'll be missed, but she's going on to a well-deserved retirement and we all wish her the best," Nixon said. Kanitz said she plans to return to Michigan where she grew up and her family lives. She made agency history "Ms. Kanitz will truly be missed by all in DeCA. She is a grass roots manager that cares greatly, not only for those that work for her, but also for our military members and their families that we are here to support. She left her personal mark at Gulfport while visiting in early September 2001, by initiating the placement of a deli in the store, a step that has been realized and enjoyed by our patrons since we reopened following Katrina in May, 2006. I hate to see her go, but wish her the best for an enjoyable and long retirement!" Walt Taylor, Store Director Gulfport NCBC Commissary in February 2002 when she became the first woman in DeCA to become a Senior Executive Service member and lead a region – the former Midwest Region. She went on to lead DeCA's European Region during the startup of Operation Iraqi Freedom before taking the reins of DeCA East in July 2004. "It's been a privilege to be part of providing such a great benefit to the deserving men and women of our nation's military – the best in the world. I've always had a great passion for this benefit and for our stores, where commitment, dedication and selflessness is overwhelming. There are so many in our stores who do more than asked, who are heroes in going the extra mile to add to the quality of life for our military and their families. I'm extremely proud to have been a part of it all and privileged to be their leader! I'll miss the people in DeCA and industry partners I've worked with over the years – many have become my friends – but I know the great work will continue and the benefit will only get stronger because of the dedication people have for it," Kanitz said. Kanitz is known as an approachable, engaged leader who especially relished visits to commissaries where she was quick to share insights for success and seek employee and customer input on how to improve the commissary benefit. She knows what it takes to run a commissary. Her career began in 1975 when she became the store manager at Calumet Radar Site, Mich., after earning her bachelor's degree from Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mich. She was selected into the first four-year intern class in the Air Force Commissary Service in 1979 and received an early placement after her first year of intern training. She went on to earn a master's degree in management and served as a store director in over seven commissaries in the United States and Europe. While store director at the Peterson Air Force Base Commissary, Colo., in 1985, the store took best commissary and best overall commissary awards, and she received the Air Force Senior Civilian Service Manager of the Year Award while there. Over the years, she served as operations division director for the AFCOMS' United Kingdom Complex, RAF Lakenheath, See Retire page 17 14 CB PG 10-15 COLOR 12:49 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  15. 15. Page 9 PG16 B&W Clean PG 9 B&W Tragedy Turns NMCB 133 Trainers into Heroes By MC3 Jessica A. McIver NMCB 133 At approximately 5:30 on the morning of March 14, 2007, five members of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Thirty Three (NMCB 133) were en route to the Udari range in Kuwait for a training exercise when they came upon the scene of a horrific traffic accident. The accident, which involved two 20passenger vans and a fourdoor Nissan truck, happened only moments before the Seabees' arrival. "The accident occurred within just a few minutes as the air was still full of dust," said Gunnery Sgt. Tom McCarty, Military Advisor to NMCB 133. Led by McCarty, NMCB 133 personnel responded immediately with medical care and on-scene organization. McCarty proudly stated, "Everywhere you looked, One Thirty Three guys were there. They were cutting bandages, hooking up IV's and bringing in MEDEVAC choppers to get the seriously injured to the hospitals." While McCarty ensured emergency services were contacted, HM1 Charlotte Bethea immediately began assessing casualties and creating a Casualty Collection Point. With assistance from UT2 Kelly Caponigro, Bethea began bandaging the injured and administering intravenous fluids (IV) as needed. "I was helping Doc [Bethea] as best I could with bandages and helping cut clothing away from the injured. We were moving from body to body so fast, that I had to go back and retrieve supplies we may have left at the last [patient]. I was trying to stay busy so I couldn't react to what was truly going on," said Caponigro. The number of casualties was beyond the medical supply capabilities of the five responders, but as Seabees "Can-Do," they adapted to the situation, and assisted as best they could. Bethea recalls how appreciative the injured were of her efforts. "I remember one of the men saying, 'Thank you, Soldier, thank you, Soldier.' Even with my lack of supplies, he was thankful that I was doing what I could for him," said Bethea. When McCarty discovered two men pinned beneath one of the passenger vans, he worked with BU2 Tyler Morgan and BUCN Nicholas Condon to rescue the men. Overcoming the language barrier, the rescuers successfully organized the uninjured survivors to lift the van, thus allowing Morgan, Condon and McCarty to pull the two severely injured men to safety. Once the victims were clear of the wreckage, Bethea and Caponigro immediately began applying bandages and tourniquets. At this point, a third victim was discovered trapped inside the overturned van. After McCarty found that he could not safely move the victim through the front window of the van, Morgan and Condon smashed the rear window, crawled in, and carried the third man from the vehicle. As the sun rose, a Nissan truck was discovered a short distance away with seven men still trapped inside. By this point, 20-30 civilians arrived on the scene and endeavored to assist the rescuers in freeing the men from the truck. McCarty found a steel pipe and unsuccessfully attempted to lever apart the twisted wreck- Community Calendar April 2007 Sunday Monday Tuesday 2 8 Easter 9 Seabee Days 10 All Cmdr's Mtg, 11 Lunchtime Bible 12 Mtg, Bldg 1, 1 p.m. Bldg. 1, Conf. Study, Bldg 1 Conf. All Khaki Social, Room, 10 a.m. Room, 11:30 - 12:30 A&E, 3 p.m age. The men were eventually freed using the Jaws of Life. After a number of minutes with McCarty and the four Seabees as the only care providers on the scene, members of Camp Beuhring's Emergency Fire and Medical Rescue Team arrived. Even with the rescue team present, Bethea, Caponigro and McCarty continued to assist, directly treating the injured as 15 16 Federal Income 17 See Heroes page 16 22 Earth Day April 5, 2007 Friday Saturday 6 Holy Week/Easter Services, Chapel, Protestant, Noon Catholic, 3 p.m. 7 Month of Mil. 13 14 20 CBC Blood Drive, Chapel, 8 - 12:45 CPOA Car Wash, A&E, 11a.m. - 1 p.m. All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m Holy Week/Easter Services Chapel, Protestant, 5 p.m. Catholic 7 p.m. 21 Basewide Hail & Farewell, Sponsored by NMCB 7, A&E., CBC/20SRG PRT makeup Child Easter Egg Hunt/Carnival, 10 a.m. - Noon, Youth Center Sports Field Holy Week Easter Vigil, Chapel, Catholic, 7:30 p.m. 23 CNRSE Taxes due 18 Spring info 19 Fitness 5K run, 6:30 a.m. Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg 1 Conf. Room, 11:30 - 12:30 24 CNRSE 25 Lunchtime Bible 26 CNRSE 27 CNRSE 28 Hurricane Exercise Hurricane Exercise Study, Bldg 1 Conf. Hurricane Exercise Hurricane Exercise April 23 - May 4 April 23 - May 4 Room, 11:30 - 12:30 April 23 - May 4 April 23 - May 4 CNRSE Hurricane Exercise April 23 May 4 COMPASS Seabee Courier 5 CBC/20SRG PRT Compass Gulfport Spouse Teams Mentoring Spouses Make New Friends, Learn about the Navy lifestyle, Acquire Knowledge and Skills, Develop Realistic expectations and a positive attitude What is COMPASS? Spouse-to-Spouse Mentoring Program 12 Hour Session Presented Over Three Days Taught by Experienced Volunteer Navy Spouses Upcoming Sessions: The Course Curriculum Benefits and Services Anchors Aweigh April 24, 25, & 26 Local Insights 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Personal Finance Moving in the Navy Getting along with others Naval History and Traditions All Navy Spouses are welcome. 9 4 Thursday 1 Commissary closed Catholic Easter Mass, Chapel 9:30 a.m. ;Protestant Easter service, Chapel, 11 a.m. 3 Wednesday Need babysitting? Inquire during registration. From Heroes page 8 well as providing medical supplies to the Rescue Team. "When they [Rescue Team] showed up, they were kind of standing aside because they thought all of us were medics. This was because all our guys were so calm and collected. I was really proud of them," said McCarty. When the Rescue Team called in medical evacuation helicopters (MEDEVAC), Morgan stopped traffic before directing the MEDEVAC choppers to the landing zone. As the three helicopters flew in, Condon marked the landing area with signal flares. Upon MEDEVAC's arrival, One Thirty Three coordinated with the crew chiefs and rescue team to load nine of the most seriously injured victims into the helicopters. Numerous other victims were treated at the scene by the Seabees and the Buehring Rescue Team. In response to this tragedy, the members of One Thirty Three once again demonstrated the importance of their skills and training. Reflecting on Seabee readiness and the team effort so evident during the rescue, Bethea commented, "More than anything else, I am so proud of the Seabees that were there with me. They stepped up and did whatever was asked of them without a second thought or hesitation." To register call: (228) 871-3000, X 7444 Force Condition Awareness COMPASS will be held at CBC Chapel Fellowship Hall. For directions call: (228) 871-3000, X7444. Provided by NCBC Public Safety COMPASS is presented by experienced Navy spouses. The Naval Construction Battalion Center commanding officer can authorize the elevation of Force Protection Conditions locally. The Crisis Management Team determines the nature and extent of threats and makes recommendations to the commanding officer. Plans are evaluated for implementing higher Force Protection Conditions. All personnel are reminded to report all suspicious or unusual incidents to NCBC Security at X2361. 15 CB PG 09-16 12:49 April 5, 2007 4/5/2007 Seabee Courier Courier5 April.qxd
  16. 16. Courier5 April.qxd 4/5/2007 12:49 Page 8 PG 17 Color CLEAN PG 8 COLOR ADS Youth Activities Center 1April 5, 2007 Seabee Courier 8 16 CB PG 08-17 COLOR April 5, 2007 3, 5:30-8:30 Teens Only Keystone Club Meeting 4, 5:30-8:30 Smart Moves & Indoor games 5, 5:30-8:30 Easter egg coloring, and Easter crafts 6, 6:00-9:00 Movies on the Big Screen Snacks Included! 7, 10:00-noon FREE Easter Egg Hunt 4 Youths ages 3-12 10, 5:30-8:30 Youth Only Torch Club Meeting 11, 5:30-8:30 Boys Vs Girls Game Night Prizes Awarded 12, 5:30-8:30 Art Club & Phase 10 tournament 13, 6:00-10:00 CiCi Pizza & Mall Trip 12-up! 14, 11:00-3:00 Pepsi Pitch, Hit & Run Local Competition 17, 5:30-8:30 Backwards Day 18, 5:30-8:30 Jr Olympic USTA Rapid Rally Compaction 19, 5:30-8:30 Spelling Bee, Prizes, Parents Welcome 20, 6:00-9:00 Dress Up Movie Night, Limit 50-$1/Person 21, 9:00-4:00 Bellingrath Gardens and Cruise! 24, 5:30-8:30 Tie Dye T-Shirt, Bring Your Own White T-Shirt 25, 5:30-8:30 Dragonfly Quest & Outdoor games Seabee Courier April April April April April April April April April April April April April April April April April

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