ScriptScene RWApresents<br />
Screenwriting Techniquesfor Prose Fiction<br />by Bill Pace<br />
screenwriting <br />
PROSE writing <br />
screenwriting <br />PROSE writing <br />
Also…<br />
screenwriting <br />
Just dialogue<br />
screenwriting <br />is…<br />
I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST <br />
I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST 2) STRUCTURE<br />
I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST 2) STRUCTURE3) LEAN (NOT MEAN) WRITING<br />
I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST <br />
The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />
The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />
The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />What does she want?<br />
The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />What does she want?<br />What stands in her way?<...
The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />What does she want?<br />What stands in her way?<...
1) Who is the story about?<br />
An Active Protagonist is…<br />
An Active Protagonist is…<br />one who has a clear end-goal she wants to achieve and works to do so, confronting obstacles...
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates...
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates...
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates...
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates...
The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates...
2) What does she want?<br />
2) What does she want?<br />Outer Goal: what she wants at story’s end<br />
2) What does she want?<br />Outer Goal: what she wants at story’s end<br />Inner Goal: why she wants it<br />
3) What stands in her way?<br />
3) What stands in her way?<br />Obstacles!<br />
3) What stands in her way?<br />Obstacles!<br />External<br />
3) What stands in her way?<br />Obstacles!<br />External<br />Internal<br />
4) What is she going to do about it?<br />
4) What is she going to do about it?<br />a) Must be willing to do whatever it takes to achieve the Outer Goal she wants t...
4) What is she going to do about it?<br />a) Must be willing to do whatever it takes to achieve the Outer Goal she wants t...
II) STRUCTURE<br />
…is your Friend!<br />
…is your Friend!<br />No, seriously – it is.<br />
The Purpose of Structure<br />
The Purpose of Structure<br />Screenwriting is structure.<br />William Goldman<br />
The Purpose of Structure<br />"In life, things happen one after the other. In structure, one thing happens because of the ...
The Purpose of Structure<br />“Good plot structure means that the right thing is happening at the right time.”<br />Michae...
The Purpose of Structure<br />Because I said so!<br />Bill Pace<br />
The Purpose of Structure<br />Good structure places the events of your story in an alignment that gives each the maximum i...
© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />© Syd Field<br />
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />© ...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />1s...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />1s...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Cl...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Cl...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Lo...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Lo...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />TH...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />TH...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />TH...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Bl...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Bl...
Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Bl...
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:...
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:...
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:...
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:...
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:...
III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:...
A <br />script<br />example…<br />
SIMPLE BLACK ON WHITE CREDITS ROLL. <br /> <br />When all is said and done, up comes a single number in parenthesis, like ...
(1)<br /> <br />INT CONFERENCE ROOM - DAY<br /> <br />The boy is TOM HANSEN. He sits at a very long rectangular conference...
NARRATOR <br />This belief stemmed from early exposure to <br />sad British pop music and a total misreading <br />of the ...
NARRATOR <br />Since the disintegration of her parents’ <br />marriage, she’d only loved two things. <br />The first was h...
A<br />prose<br />example…<br />
Remember…<br />
screenwriting <br />PROSE writing <br />
But…<br />
screenwriting <br />&<br />PROSE writing <br />
are…<br />
WRITING!<br />
So keep on writing…<br />WRITING!<br />
Good luck!<br />
Screenwriting techniques for prose (web)
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Screenwriting techniques for prose (web)

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This was a PowerPoint presentation I used when asked to speak to ScriptScene, a screenwriting chapter of the Romance Writer’s of America, at the annual convention in NYC. The topic was on screenwriting techniques that can be applied to writing prose fiction, but it also works as a good introduction to core screenwriting concepts.

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  • This PowerPoint document was the foundation for my presentation, so a lot of what I actually lectured is not here, but if you click on the 'Speaker Notes' tab, you’ll see some of the info and prompts I used to speak mostly extemporaneously. Also it’s missing the humor I (hopefully) added in my delivery. Still, the core info here is very important. Feel free to contact me for more info if you’d like.
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  • Sounds simple, but you’d be surprised how often writers think it’s obvious who their story is about, but they fail to make it clear to the reader. And why isn’t it clear? Because the writer has failed to make sure the story moves because of the protagonist, not to the protagonist. Part of the problem may be many writers are used to observing life in order to capture it in their writing. In the world of literary fiction the passive, observing character is a strong staple … and you can get away with it in a book because we’re centered right in the character’s mind: we are privy to all thoughts and decisions. But it can be a trap too and create a story that may be well told and written, but nothing happens!Which is why I like to use the phrase ACTIVE PROTAGONIST.
  • What do you think that means?
  • The story happens because she wants something and goes out to try and achieve it despite the many things that stand in her way. The story directly progresses because of the protagonist, thus making her active in its creation.
  • What is the thing that the protagonist wants to achieve by the end of the story?This is what will propel them on the journey through the body of the story and it is called…
  • What is the thing that the protagonist wants to achieve by the end of the story?This is what will propel them on the journey through the body of the story. And for a romance writer, what they want is love. But be sure to be specific about that; make it clear who represents that love.
  • IG is the motivation for what she wants. For love, it’s something we all want, but there can be variations.Really?
  • If nothing is in the way, then the story has no conflict and most likely no interest.
  • Antagonist, circumstances, social mores, etc.
  • Fear, insecurity, sense of morality, etc.
  • May be one of the most underrated elements of character creation. If you have a great goal and obstacles, but the protagonist is not willing to really do anything about the situation, or doesn’t care or try hard enough, the audience will not be in interested in her story. Scarlet O’Hara is one of the most famous protagonist because she says, &quot;I swear by God that I will NEVER be poor again!” And she means it!
  • May be one of the most underrated elements of character creation. If you have a great goal and obstacles, but the protagonist is not willing to really do anything about the situation, or doesn’t care or try hard enough, the audience will not be in interested in her story. Scarlet O’Hara is one of the most famous protagonist because she says, &quot;I swear by God that I will NEVER be poor again!” And she means it!
  • If the protagonist is never pushed beyond her normal limits, then she will never grow and never truly earn the goal she seeks. She must be pushed to the point of nearly breaking, and in fact wants to give up … but – crucially – doesn’t.
  • Ask how many plot their stories before writing.And then ask why they don’t, if they don’t.(Hopefully something like “stifling creativity” comes up.
  • Too many writers few structure as strait-jacket or something that limits their creativity.
  • Too many writers few structure as strait-jacket or something that limits their creativity.
  • What some writers &amp; instructors have to say about structure:
  • Better known as “cause &amp; effect.” One thing happens that causes and effect, which then causes something else to happen.TITANIC – Jack wins cards, gets trip in TITANIC, meets Rose, pursues her, upsets finacee who then plants evidence on him…
  • Better known as “cause &amp; effect.” One thing happens that causes and effect, which then causes something else to happen.TITANIC – Jack wins cards, gets trip in TITANIC, meets Rose, pursues her, upsets finacee who then plants evidence on him…
  • While there areno “absolutes” in storytelling, there is an order that will enhance the narrative.
  • Hey, it sometimes works.
  • Because you spend enough time trying to come up with this stuff – why wouldn’t you want to have each element be as powerful as possible?
  • Give Syd his due.
  • ACT I - Sets up your story; tells us who your main character is, what their goal is and introduces the main conflict that becomes their obstacle. Also sets the tone and style the movie will take.
  • ACT II - Your main character begins confronting the series of obstacles standing in his/her way. They also reveal more about themselves (backstory &amp; secrets) and what motivates them. They suffer setbacks that test their desire for their goal, often culminating in a &quot;darkest hour&quot; when all seems lost right before Turning Point #2.
  • ACT III - Things pick up speed now as the protagonist moves faster and closer to achieving their goal, putting the final pieces of the plot&apos;s &quot;puzzle&quot; together and racing toward the...
  • Writing is NOT math, but these are guidelines to use.
  • Writing is NOT math, but these are guidelines to use.
  • Writing is NOT math, but these are guidelines to use.
  • TURNING POINT #1 - Is an action or event that comes near the end of Act I (around pages 25-30) and turns the narrative drive of the story into a new direction, kicking it out of the Setup of Act I and into the Confrontation of the Act II. Either the protagonist&apos;s Outer Goal is defined or the means to achieve their Goal become clear and they start on the path toward achieving it.
  • TURNING POINT #2 - Is an action or event that comes near the end of Act II (around pages 85-90) and turns the narrative drive of the story into a new direction, kicking it out of the Confrontation of the Act II, closer toward the Resolution of Act III and moves things into a &quot;higher gear.&quot; Sometimes it is the &quot;light at the end of the tunnel&quot;: something that gives them new information or inspiration to move beyond the &quot;darkest hour&quot; and push toward the climax.
  • CLIMAX - Your character faces the biggest obstacle of all in a climactic showdown and, in doing so, finally achieves the opportunity to realize his/her Outer Goal.
  • MID-POINT: (“I know it when I see it!”) “Point of no return” – raises the character&apos;s commitment to another level. TITANIC: Jack &amp; Rose make love in car AND ship hits iceberg.Sometimes it also defines a new goal for the protagonist. May also be a false victory or false defeat. T&amp;L: Pitt steals their money.
  • Remember: screenwriting is NOT prose writing.
  • Screenwriting techniques for prose (web)

    1. 1. ScriptScene RWApresents<br />
    2. 2. Screenwriting Techniquesfor Prose Fiction<br />by Bill Pace<br />
    3. 3. screenwriting <br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5. PROSE writing <br />
    6. 6. screenwriting <br />PROSE writing <br />
    7. 7. Also…<br />
    8. 8. screenwriting <br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10. Just dialogue<br />
    11. 11. screenwriting <br />is…<br />
    12. 12. I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST <br />
    13. 13. I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST 2) STRUCTURE<br />
    14. 14. I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST 2) STRUCTURE3) LEAN (NOT MEAN) WRITING<br />
    15. 15. I) ACTIVE PROTAGONIST <br />
    16. 16. The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />
    17. 17. The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />
    18. 18. The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />What does she want?<br />
    19. 19. The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />What does she want?<br />What stands in her way?<br />
    20. 20. The 4 Essential Protagonist Questions:<br />Who is the story about?<br />What does she want?<br />What stands in her way?<br />What is she going to do about it?<br />
    21. 21. 1) Who is the story about?<br />
    22. 22. An Active Protagonist is…<br />
    23. 23. An Active Protagonist is…<br />one who has a clear end-goal she wants to achieve and works to do so, confronting obstacles she must work to overcome (changing strategy as necessary) and, ultimately, getting the opportunity to achieve her goal in a climactic situation where she must confront her greatest fear and/or strongest antagonist.<br />
    24. 24. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />
    25. 25. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />
    26. 26. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />
    27. 27. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />
    28. 28. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates narrative Conflict…<br />
    29. 29. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates narrative Conflict.<br />She successfully overcomes obstacle…<br />
    30. 30. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates narrative Conflict.<br />She successfully overcomes obstacle…<br />only to run into another, bigger obstacle…<br />
    31. 31. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates narrative Conflict.<br />She successfully overcomes obstacle…<br />only to run into another, bigger obstacle…<br />she confronts with increased strength/wisdom…<br />sometimes running into setbacks but always pushing…<br />
    32. 32. The Active Protagonist Pyramid<br />Protagonist…<br />has a vital Goal…<br />but runs into an Obstacle…<br />which creates narrative Conflict.<br />She successfully overcomes obstacle…<br />only to run into another, bigger obstacle…<br />confronts it with increased strength/wisdom…<br />sometimes running into setbacks but always pushing…<br />toward Climax where she gets the opportunity to win her Goal!<br />
    33. 33. 2) What does she want?<br />
    34. 34. 2) What does she want?<br />Outer Goal: what she wants at story’s end<br />
    35. 35. 2) What does she want?<br />Outer Goal: what she wants at story’s end<br />Inner Goal: why she wants it<br />
    36. 36. 3) What stands in her way?<br />
    37. 37. 3) What stands in her way?<br />Obstacles!<br />
    38. 38. 3) What stands in her way?<br />Obstacles!<br />External<br />
    39. 39. 3) What stands in her way?<br />Obstacles!<br />External<br />Internal<br />
    40. 40. 4) What is she going to do about it?<br />
    41. 41. 4) What is she going to do about it?<br />a) Must be willing to do whatever it takes to achieve the Outer Goal she wants to claim.<br />
    42. 42. 4) What is she going to do about it?<br />a) Must be willing to do whatever it takes to achieve the Outer Goal she wants to claim.<br />b) Even when pushed and tested beyond the normal boundaries of her usual world.<br />
    43. 43. II) STRUCTURE<br />
    44. 44. …is your Friend!<br />
    45. 45. …is your Friend!<br />No, seriously – it is.<br />
    46. 46. The Purpose of Structure<br />
    47. 47. The Purpose of Structure<br />Screenwriting is structure.<br />William Goldman<br />
    48. 48. The Purpose of Structure<br />"In life, things happen one after the other. In structure, one thing happens because of the other."<br />Lew Hunter<br />
    49. 49. The Purpose of Structure<br />“Good plot structure means that the right thing is happening at the right time.”<br />Michael Hauge<br />
    50. 50. The Purpose of Structure<br />Because I said so!<br />Bill Pace<br />
    51. 51. The Purpose of Structure<br />Good structure places the events of your story in an alignment that gives each the maximum impact possible.<br />Bill Pace<br />
    52. 52. © Syd Field<br />
    53. 53. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />© Syd Field<br />
    54. 54. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />© Syd Field<br />
    55. 55. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />© Syd Field<br />
    56. 56. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />© Syd Field<br />
    57. 57. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />© Syd Field<br />
    58. 58. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />© Syd Field<br />
    59. 59. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />© Syd Field<br />
    60. 60. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />1st Turning Point <br />© Syd Field<br />
    61. 61. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />1st Turning Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />© Syd Field<br />
    62. 62. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />© Syd Field<br />
    63. 63. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />© Syd Field<br />
    64. 64. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Lowest point<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />© Syd Field<br />
    65. 65. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Lowest point<br />Recommitment to Goal<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />© Syd Field<br />
    66. 66. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />THE HERO’S JOURNEY<br />Known World<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />
    67. 67. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />THE HERO’S JOURNEY<br />Unknown World<br />Known World<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />
    68. 68. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />THE HERO’S JOURNEY<br />Unknown World<br />Known World<br />Mastery of Worlds<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />
    69. 69. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Blake Snyder’s SAVE THE CAT<br />Thesis<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />
    70. 70. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Blake Snyder’s SAVE THE CAT<br />Thesis<br />Antithesis<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />
    71. 71. Act I<br />Act II<br />Act III<br />Set-Up<br />Confrontation<br />Big Push<br />(≈ 25%)<br />(≈ 50%)<br />(≈ 25%)<br />Blake Snyder’s SAVE THE CAT<br />Thesis<br />Antithesis<br />Synthesis<br />Climax<br />1st Turning Point <br />Mid-Point <br />2nd Turning Point <br />
    72. 72. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />
    73. 73. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:<br />
    74. 74. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:<br />a character<br />
    75. 75. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:<br />a character<br />an image<br />
    76. 76. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:<br />a character<br />an image<br />an action<br />
    77. 77. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:<br />a character<br />an image<br />an action<br />an emotional response<br />
    78. 78. III) LEAN (BUT NOT TOO MEAN<br />Paragraphs shouldn’t be more than a few lines long & each should describe only one thing:<br />a character<br />an image<br />an action<br />an emotional response<br />a different view<br />
    79. 79. A <br />script<br />example…<br />
    80. 80. SIMPLE BLACK ON WHITE CREDITS ROLL. <br /> <br />When all is said and done, up comes a single number in parenthesis, like so:<br /> <br />(478)<br /> <br />EXT. PARK - DAY<br /> <br />For a few seconds we watch A MAN (20s) and a WOMAN (20s) on a park bench. Their names are TOM and SUMMER. Neither one says a word.<br /> <br />CLOSE ON her HAND, covering his. Notice the wedding ring. No words are spoken. Tom looks at her the way every woman wants to be looked at.<br /> <br />A DISTINGUISHED VOICE begins to speak to us.<br /> <br />NARRATOR<br />This is a story of boy meets girl.<br /> <br />
    81. 81. (1)<br /> <br />INT CONFERENCE ROOM - DAY<br /> <br />The boy is TOM HANSEN. He sits at a very long rectangular conference table. The walls are lined with framed blow-up sized greeting cards. Tom, dark hair and blue eyes, wears a t- shirt under his sports coat and Adidas tennis shoes to<br />balance out the corporate dress code. He looks pretty bored.<br /> <br />NARRATOR<br />The boy, Tom Hansen of Margate, New Jersey, <br />grew up believing that he’d never truly be <br />happy until the day he met his... “soulmate.”<br /> <br />INT LIVING ROOM - 1989<br /> <br />PRE-TEEN TOM sits alone on his bed engrossed in a movie. His walls are covered in posters of obscure bands. <br /> <br />From the TV, we hear: “Elaine! Elaine!” <br />
    82. 82. NARRATOR <br />This belief stemmed from early exposure to <br />sad British pop music and a total misreading <br />of the movie, “The Graduate.”<br />INT OFFICE CUBICLE - PRESENT DAY<br />The girl is SUMMER FINN. She files folders and answers phones in a plain white office. She has cropped blonde hair almost like a boy’s but her face is feminine and pretty enough to get away with it.<br />NARRATOR <br />The girl, Summer Finn of Shinnecock, Michigan, <br />did not share this belief.<br />INT BATHROOM – 1994<br />Teenage Summer stares at herself in the mirror. Her hair extends down to her lower back.<br />
    83. 83. NARRATOR <br />Since the disintegration of her parents’ <br />marriage, she’d only loved two things. <br />The first was her long blonde hair.<br />She picks up scissors from the counter and begins to slice.<br />NARRATOR <br />The second was how easily she could<br />cut it off... <br />Summer continues cutting, her expression never changing.<br />NARRATOR <br />And feel nothing.<br />
    84. 84. A<br />prose<br />example…<br />
    85. 85.
    86. 86.
    87. 87. Remember…<br />
    88. 88. screenwriting <br />PROSE writing <br />
    89. 89. But…<br />
    90. 90. screenwriting <br />&<br />PROSE writing <br />
    91. 91. are…<br />
    92. 92. WRITING!<br />
    93. 93. So keep on writing…<br />WRITING!<br />
    94. 94. Good luck!<br />

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