Leading IT Service & Support          March/April 2009                                                         TM         ...
Letter From the Editor                                                        SupportWorld Readers,                       ...
Editor-in-Chief                                                                                                           ...
What are You                                                                        Is It okay for customers to know that ...
Researchin addition to any cost benefits telecommuting might have, many     on a final note, it is important to mention an...
GEnErAtions                                                                                                               ...
Strategy    thE bAby booMErs:   Description    Born between 1946 and 1964, this group of 79 million Americans includes suc...
Reality                                                            Prescriptionsz Many are struggling to survive financial...
So, What have We Learned aboutGenerationS at Work?Do productive generational relations matter in theworkplace? Yes and the...
Robert S. Last is the content manager for HDI. For moreruLe #3                                                         tha...
www.ThinkHDI.com/HDI2009                                    |   800.248.5667                                              ...
april 6-9, 2009Mandalay Bay | las Vegas, nV                                                                               ...
th in w:      i ,     w d ne    t l u O eO e th                                                                           ...
MetricsandMeasurementsStopping the Madness—Add New MetricsFocus your attention on CUSTOMER-centric metrics                ...
This new customer metric shows how the center protects                                                           Another l...
“HDI has helped me take my help desk   from worst-in-class to first-in-class.”                     — Darien Chimoff, Help ...
hDiLoCALChAptErListinGSTaTe   ciTy                               chapTer name           chapTer conTacT      poSiTion     ...
ManagIng                                                                            a Support Center                      ...
SupportCenterManagement service is not just the responsibility   service delivered by the students.       z Make sure you ...
Moving from                         ITIL                                                            ®Version   2 to Versio...
ITIL Processes in V2IT Service Management must have a solid foundationto drive long-term value. In version 2 of the framew...
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Copyright © 2009 HDI® • HDI SupportWorldTM,
ISSN 1559-3975

SupportWorld™ is a trademark of HDI and is published six times per year.
All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of the contents in whole or in
part without permission of the publisher is prohibited.”

Copyright © 2009 Think Service, Inc. All rights reserved. Think Service, Inc.
and HDI are registered trademarks of Think Service, Inc. Other trademarks or
trade names are the property of their respective owners.

KCS SM is a registered service mark of the Consortium for Service Innovation.

ITIL® is a registered trademark, and a registered community trademark of
the Office of Government Commerce, and is registered in the U.S. Patent
and Trademark Office. IT Infrastructure Library ® is a registered trademark
of the Office of Government Commerce.

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SupportWorld 03-04 2009

  1. 1. Leading IT Service & Support March/April 2009 TM Strategy It Is the Process, Not the Medium: Using Social Networks in a Service Operation Technology Out with the Old, In with the New: New Metrics No Contact Center Manager Can Live Without Metrics and Measurements Moving from ITIL® Version 2 to Version 3 ITIL®
  2. 2. Letter From the Editor SupportWorld Readers, A s the financial crisis and turbulent economic downfall continues, our organizations are feeling the impact in ways many of us haven’t experienced in a long time, or maybe even never—we currently face challenges that are unwanted, unexpected, and yes, many times downright uncomfortable. Despite our current state of upheaval and uncertainty, optimism and innovation can help win our battle against the current economic situation. Necessity is the mother of invention. —Plato Whether you are a manager or working the frontlines, it is imperative to put on your thinking cap and get creative in the ways you service both your customers and your employees. Kelly Ackerman-McLaughlin, in her article on page 22, states, “If you are a manager or supervisor, it is important now, more than ever, to make the staff in the support center feel valued and a part of finding ways to improve processes and operate more efficiently. And, as a support center staff, it is critical to focus on that personal touch to customer service that makes the customer want to use the services that you are providing.” While the focal point of our attention is mostly (and rightly so) on the economy and its ensuing effects, there are other issues looming in the background that must be addressed as well. On top of managing and working with today’s diverse economic, cultural, and ethnic workforce, a new player has entered the field—the multi- generational workforce. Robert Last, HDI’s content manager, begins his series “Generations at Work” in this issue with an article that explores the myths and the realities about the stark variations of our “Baby Boomers,” Gen Xers,” and “Gen Yers,”—what we can expect, how to interact, and ways to utilize each generation for maximum outcome and longevity in our organizations. The HDI 2009 conference and expo is just around the corner. Taking place at the Mandalay Bay Resort in Las Vegas, April 6-9, I hope to see you there! HDI 2009 is the place to go for innovative ideas, original support strategies, and leading edge technology trends. Remember: we can all continue to thrive in 2009! More information on HDI 2009 can be found on our Web site at www.ThinkHDI.com/hdi2009. If you have questions or comments, or have a story to share, please e-mail me at jneider@ThinkHDI.com. Best Regards, Julie Neider Please send your comments and questions regarding SupportWorld TM.Letters to the editor should be sent to jneider@ThinkHDI.com or by mail to: 102 South Tejon Street, Suite 1200 • Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 We reserve the right to edit all letters.
  3. 3. Editor-in-Chief Contributors Julie Neider Kelly Ackerman-McLaughlin Robert Last Art Director Jim McKennan Scott Hanson Julie L. Mohr Dr. Jodie Monger Jenny Rains SupportWorldTM is published by HDI®6 Research What Are You Wearing? 68 Strategy Generations at Work: Understanding the Generations16 Metrics and Measurements Out with the Old, In with the New: New Metrics No Contact Center Manager Can Live Without 1622 Support Center Management Managing a Support Center in Difficult Times 24 3224 ITIL ® Moving from ITIL® Version 2 to Version 330 The Service Doctor32 Vertical Market College Students on the Help Desk: Best Practices in Managing the Millennials on Campus38 Technology Trends Down Economy Drives Creativity: Adapting to Change40 Technology It Is the Process, Not the Medium: Using Social Networks in a Service Operation46 Community NewsCopyright © 2009 HDI® • HDI SupportWorldTM, ISSN 1559-3975 For advertising opportunities, call: Cheri BrunoSupportWorld™ is a trademark of HDI and is published six times per year. Advertising Director • 781.259.4230All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of the contents in whole or in HDI® publishes SupportWorldSM professional journal six times per year.part without permission of the publisher is prohibited.” We welcome your input.Copyright © 2009 Think Service, Inc. All rights reserved. Think Service, Inc. To submit articles, write or call: Julie Neiderand HDI are registered trademarks of Think Service, Inc. Other trademarks or HDI • 102 South Tejon Street, Suite 1200, Colorado Springs, CO 80903trade names are the property of their respective owners. 770.932.1868 • jneider@ThinkHDI.comKCS SM is a registered service mark of the Consortium for Service Innovation. For subscription and membership information, contact HDI’s membership services centerITIL® is a registered trademark, and a registered community trademark of at: 800.248.5667 • 719.268.0174 • www.ThinkHDI.comthe Office of Government Commerce, and is registered in the U.S. Patentand Trademark Office. IT Infrastructure Library ® is a registered trademarkof the Office of Government Commerce.
  4. 4. What are You Is It okay for customers to know that the person on the other end of the phone mIght be In theIr pajamas? With the number of telecommuting Workers increasing in america, Where does it support stand on thisWearing? issue and What are theY doing in their support centers (or NoT iN Their supporT ceNTers)? in JanuarY 2009, hdi asked its members about their practices and beliefs around telecommuting it support analYsts.by JennyRAINS TelecommuTe—To work for aN employer from a remoTe locaTioN such as a home office. These employees are ofTeN referred To as Teleworkers, remoTe employees, or virTual employees. TelecommuTing in 2009 % of support centers that have staff who telecommute at least once a week: hdi asked how many analysts are telecommuting in each support center. results are based on 410 responses: all of their staff 6% half or more of their staff 4% % of support analysts who telecommute: less than half of their staff 25% none of their staff 64% how often employed contracted full time 5% 4% in 2009, over one-third of support centers have at least some at least once a week 7% 5% portion of their staff telecommuting once a week or more. at least once a month 5% 3% although not much difference, there is a slightly higher percent less than once a month 9% 9% of employed workers telecommuting rather than contractors. Telecommuting and Finances in a time when support center budgets are being stripped down of those who have remote staff, under half (46%) are at least to the bones, it is interesting to dig into the financial aspect of partially paying for the analysts’ phone and internet connections. telecommuting. When asked, 58% of hdi members agree that however, 72% are fully covering hardware and software costs; telecommuting saves a company money. 10% are partially covering theses costs. is it worth it? www.ThinkHDI.com I March/April 2009
  5. 5. Researchin addition to any cost benefits telecommuting might have, many on a final note, it is important to mention and to monitor inbelieve there is another positive argument for telecommuting. the future that 70% of respondents report that the concept offifty-nine percent (59%) say that companies have a staffing telecommuting is not completely accepted by all levels of theiradvantage if they allow remote workers; only 13% disagree. companies. so, while there might be a trend of a growing remote workforce in it support, many managers and directors arethe benefits of telecommuting could use more in-depth probably encountering various road blocks when attemptingresearch; however, the perception seems to be that it can save to increase these numbers.money and improve staff quality. but do the benefits outweighany hassle of managing a remote staff? Just under a quarter ofrespondents believe that they do not, while 45% believe that thebenefits are worth the trouble.What are you wearing?so, is it okay for support analysts to allow customers to knowthey are working remotely? maybe some believe that the thoughtof support analysts in their pj’s might come across asunprofessional. Whatever the case might be, it support is indeadlock about this subject. one-third believes it is okay forcustomers to know the analyst is not in the office, another thirddoes not think it should be allowed, and another third is eithertorn or indifferent. the industry needs to learn more about thecustomers’ perception of teleworkers.it is okay for the customers to know that thesupport center analyst is telecommuting?
  6. 6. GEnErAtions At work:unDErstAnDinG“GEnErAtions ArE AMonG thE Most powErFuL ForCEs in history. trACkinG thEir MArCh throuGh tiME LEnDs orDEr—AnD EvEn A MEAsurE oF prEDiCtAbiLity—to LonG-tErM trEnDs.” 11 Neil Howe and William Strauss, The Next 20 Years-How Customer and Workforce Attitudes Will Evolve (Cambridge: Harvard Business Review Publishing Corporation, 2007), Reprint R0707B, 1. C ontrary to what you may have heard, A multi-generational workforce that works together with its leaders to be successful will different generations can and do work solve the problems facing organizational together every day without driving leaders and managers for the next twenty themselves and each other to insanity, years. The best managed and most profitable organizations will be the ones that effectively to homicide, or to drunkenness. Yes, integrate multiple generations into a cohesive they are different from one another; they bring different workgroup. In this article, the author will provide a brief description of each generation, skills to the workplace and their attitudes about work explore the myths and the realities about and organizations reflect their different life experiences, each one, and offer some brief guidelines for but in case no one has mentioned it, the U.S. Department leading each generation. Finally, there will also be directions for obtaining a reading of Defense has been employing hundreds of thousands list of books and articles on the different of multi-generational employees for years. From the generations that is stored in the HDI Members Toolbox on the HDI Web site. 18-year-old U.S. Army private first class on patrol outside Kandahar to General David Petraeus (age 56) in his Central Command office in Tampa, FL, the DOD has 2 Ibid, p. 71. fielded an astonishingly effective workforce for years 3 Howe and Strauss, Op cit, p. 4. under some very trying circumstances. 4 Zemke, Raines and Filipczak, Op cit, p. 90. 5 Zemke, Raines and Filipcak, Op cit., p. 81-84. 6 “Baby Boomer Generation Versus Generation X and Y-“Generation Y and X,” Gregory P. Smith. URL: http://www.chartcourse.com/articlebabyvsgenx.html. Retrieved on January 28, 2009, p. 1-2. 7 Ibid, p 126.
  7. 7. Strategy thE bAby booMErs: Description Born between 1946 and 1964, this group of 79 million Americans includes such illustrious members as former President Bill Clinton (born 1946, age 62) and his wife Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (born 1947, age 61), President Barack Obama (born 1961, age 47), and Ron Muns, founder of HDI (born 1948, age 60). The Baby Boom cohort is unusual in that it is increasingly divided into two groups, the “First Half” and the “Second Half,” also called the “older Boomers” and the “younger Boomers.” “In fact, demographers tell us that first-halfers, those born in the 1940s, make more money and own more homes than second-half Boomers, those born between 1950 and 1960. First-halfers’ worldview was more affected by the 1950s. They felt a more integral and active part of the 1960s ‘scene’—free love, drugs, sex, rock-n-roll, Vietnam, women’s lib—if not as active participants, then at least as very aware observers. For second-halfers, the 1950s were mostly a vague memory and the 1960s “movements” more an observed than participated-in phenomenon, though individual exceptions do indeed exist.” 2 This is the generation that raised its consciousness and was involved in or was impacted by the Vietnam War protests, the Summer of Love (1967), the Democratic convention in Chicago (1968), Woodstock (1969), and Kent State (1970).3 Myths President Barack Obama is z They are on their way out. an illustrious member of the z They will grow up. baby boomer generation. z They have always had it easy; they are assured of a comfortable retirement. z They have quit learning. z Boomers are workaholics. GEnErAtion X Reality Description z The average life expectancy for today’s woman is 78.8 This demographic group has 39 million people in it years, for men, 72. Boomers can expect to live longer, born between 1961 and 1981. They account among healthier work lives than any previous generation. their members, Robert Downey, Jr (born 1965, age 43), z The sales of Harley-Davidson motorcycles doubled in the Jennifer Anniston (born 1969, age 39), Leonardo DiCaprio early 1990s, and the majority of buyers were Boomers. (born 1974, age 34), Tiger Woods (born 1975, age 33) z Of all the generations, Boomers have the largest credit and Reese Witherspoon (born 1976, age 32). Generation card debt. They have an average of twenty years X employees“ …have a voracious appetite for technology remaining on their mortgages. The gap between what and learning. This is good unless your organization is not Boomers should save and what they do save is $3,564. willing or able to share information or has up-to-date z Boomers are endlessly learning and have created a cottage technology;” they “…tend to be less motivated by industry that caters to old dogs learning new tricks. promises of overtime pay and more motivated by personal z Boomers, especially those approaching fifty, are satisfaction with their jobs. They want to grow in their working fewer hours.4 jobs and learn new skills.” They “…want, and expect, their employers to hear what they have to say. They want Prescriptions to understand the ‘big picture’ for the company and how z Let them know their experience will not only be valued, this influences their employment and growth. They are but also used and leveraged as resources, mentors, and creative thinkers, independent; results oriented and bring consultants (Note: Not all Boomers make good mentors). with them a healthy dose of skepticism.”6 z Coach tactfully; ask questions; show them that every day is an opportunity to make a difference. Myths z Watch for the Boomers with an “I know all that” chip on z They are materialistic. their shoulder. z They are whiners. z Give them lots of public recognition; give them a chance z They have a “you owe me” attitude. to prove themselves and their worth; reward their work z They are not willing to work hard. ethic and long hours.5 z They are living on “easy street.”
  8. 8. Reality Prescriptionsz Many are struggling to survive financially; “Economists z Expect them to insist upon a work-life balance. tell us this is the first U.S. generation that probably won’t z Allow them to contribute to the work and the success be able to replicate or improve their parent’s lifestyle.” 7 of the organization.z “Gen Xers face some rather daunting challenges (and this z They hate corporate politics and will not tolerate was written in 2000)—college loans and skyrocketing coworkers or organizations that “play politics.” healthcare costs—yet most are philosophical about the z Provide them opportunities for training, early problems they are inheriting.” 8 and often.z They are no more advocates of the philosophy of z They are good at multitasking and working entitlement than any other generation. with technology.z They are willing to work hard, but they will not allow z They continuously look to validate their “employee themselves to be abused or exploited; no more seventy- value proposition;” as quickly as possible, help to hour weeks in the IT department. feel like insiders.z In the 1950s, the percentage of monthly income devoted to a mortgage was 14 percent, today it can be as high as 25 to 33 percent.9 GEnErAtion XGEnErAtion y or thE MiLLEniALsThey are the second largest demographic group in American history (67 million of them) born between 1982 and 2005,they include such famous people as Miley Cyrus (1992, age 16), Daniel Radcliffe—“Harry Potter” (1989, age 19), actressJessica Alba (1981, age 27) and swimmer Michael Phelps (1985, age 23). This is the generation that received “Thanks forParticipating” trophies and were raised, in many cases by “helicopter parents.” They are known for being easily bored,being team-oriented, and having powerful technical and multi-tasking skills. They want lots of attention, expect quickresults, and expect rapid ascent to higher salaries, they are optimistic, charitable, and act with integrity; they relate betterto Baby Boomers than Generation X and they admire the values of their “elders.”10Mythsz Generation Y lives in the moment and would rather play than work. Swimmer Michael Phelps andz Generation Y expects instant gratification.z Gen Y slacks off at work to take care of Miley Cyrus join the second personal matters. largest demographic groupz Gen Y workers cannot take direction.z Generation Y employees have a sense of entitlement in American history born and do not want to “pay their dues.” between 1982 and 2005.Realityz One third of Gen Y respondents in a Robert Half survey were concerned about finding/keeping a job, supporting themselves and their families, and “saving enough” money (and this was in February 2008!).z They are focused on the future and are worried 8 Ibid, p. 126. about funding their retirement. 9 “Don’t Bite Off Too Much House,” URL: http://articles.moneycentral.z Seventy-three percent worry about balancing msn.com/Banking/HomebuyingGuide/Don’tBiteOffTooMuchHouse.aspx. Retrieved: January 30, 2009. professional and personal obligations. 10 “Workforce 2012..R U Ready?” Slide 8 “Traits.” Katherine Spencer Lee,z They want frequent communication with the boss. President, Southeast Operations, Robert Half Technology. A PowerPointz They expect to pay their dues, but in different ways.11 before the HDI Strategic Advisory Board, September 11, 2008. 11 “What Millennial Workers Want: How to Attract and retain Gen Y Employees,” Robert Half Technology, February 25, 2008, p3-4. URL: http://www.hotjobsresources.com/pdfs/MillennialWorkers.pdf. Retrieved on January 30, 2009.
  9. 9. So, What have We Learned aboutGenerationS at Work?Do productive generational relations matter in theworkplace? Yes and they are more important than manypeople think. The most important reasons are identifiedand discussed in the Randstad 2008 World of Work report(http://www.us.randstad.com/2008WorldofWork.pdf).The report states:“Workplaces are multigenerational environments withemployees from 16 to 60-plus. Each group has differingperceptions, understandings, and prejudices. With therelentless reality of Baby Boomers retirement, there hasbeen a new movement to share common workspaces andvalue cross-generational interaction. It is an optimistic,noble aspiration. But Gen Y, Gen X, Baby Boomers, andMatures have different definitions of experience, sharing,and no consistent way to understand what each other hasto offer. So, instead of creating an energetic fusion ofknowledge, perspective, and experience we end up withseveral blunt learnings.z The transfer of knowledge between retiring generations of veteran workers and newer entrants to the workforce is unlikely.z Perceptions of co-workers, particularly those in Gen Y, are based largely in stereotypes.z Each generation sees itself as bringing different strengths to the workplace that don’t enhance or expand the strengths of those older or younger.To avoid such wasteful, shortsighted, and damagingenvironments, the best leaders will follow the:neW ruLeS of ManaGeMentruLe #1Advancement is as important as compensation.Gen Y is more about advancement, additional training,and recognition of a new position. Raises aren’t viewed asrewards. They are the logical result of doing a good job.Achievement equals advancement.ruLe #2Straight talk, feedback, encouragement, and recognitionType A managers take notice, Gen Y expects passion,humor, and straight talk. Truthful, direct communicationis a straight expectation. No biz-speak, acronyms, impliedmessages, or ‘spin-doctoring.’ Clear communication,feedback, and encouragement are the clear expectation.Engagement equals motivation.
  10. 10. Robert S. Last is the content manager for HDI. For moreruLe #3 than twenty years he has been involved in the IT technicalRethink and redesign management. support field as a manager, trainer, consultant, and industry analyst. He is the author of dozens of articles,How do you manage Gen Y? How do you convert Gen Y white papers, and HDI focus books on a wide rangeto managers? The rules have changed and organizations of topics related to all aspects of technical supportneed to re-design their practices, procedures, and culture in and is the author of the soon to be released book,advance. More frequent performance reviews, accelerated How to Be a Successful Support Center Analyst. He also supports the HDI membership and staff by managingadvancement, tiered reward and incentive programs, and the “Ask the Expert” service on the HDI Web site.daily structured communication are just the beginning.Numbers remain important but impersonal. Bob is a graduate of Cleveland State University with a B.A. in urban studies and an M.A. in history. He also holds certificates in disaster recovery planning, management,ruLe #4 and instructional design. He is anCreate an evolving community. HDI certified Support Center Analyst and Support Center Manager.Cubicles became a workplace cliché before Gen Y was born.The “little boxes” perception of the workplace has absolutelyno relevance to them. Common areas, multigenerationalwork teams, “trainutainment,” and relationships aremost comfortable and meet their personal experiences.For them, meeting and interacting online is just ascomfortable and ‘real’ as face-to-face meetings sothey don’t respond to structured office environments.Plus, there is little room for compromise on this point.They expect a fluid, evolving work community that is Rockin’open to shared knowledge, rapid action, and new ideas. RobbyNothing rigid or static wanted.12the future iS So briGht,You’LL need ShadeSIs this type of workplace easy to implement and maintain?No! Is it realistic? Yes! We will see, and the test ofsuccessful leaders and employees will be, to determineif they can all work together or just drive each othercrazy! Success will produce—and I generallyhate to use this word—synergies that will becompetitive advantage, a value-added servicedifferentiator from an organization’s competitors,and give a potential employee an enhancedemployee value proposition when decidingwhat company to work for. If that weren’tenough, it’ll make the office more fun too! 12 2008 World at Work, p. 21-22. Randstad, 2008. URL: http://www.us.randstad.com/2008WorldofWork.pdf Retrieved January 22, 2008.
  11. 11. www.ThinkHDI.com/HDI2009 | 800.248.5667 special performance by penn & teller Service and Support Strategy Experienced managers and executives (five or more years in a management role), who are responsible for strategic direction, vision, and long-term planning, will benefit most from this track. The sessions address thought-provoking support perspectives and emerging trends pertinent to evolving or mature support organizations. They are designed to challenge your established thinking, generate new constructs for service excellence, and engage you in stimulating dialogue with industry peers. An ideal complement to the Executive Connections program. Key-2 Thriving in a Chaotic Economy All experience levels 501 Striking the Right Balance: Cost vs. Quality in IT Support Advanced 102 Viva Opportunity! Elevating Your Support Center’s Visibility and Value Intermediate/Advanced 502 Evaluating Outsourcing? Tips to Ensure Success Intermediate/Advanced 201 Leverage COBIT to Better Integrate the Service Desk with the Business Intermediate/ Advanced 601 The New Customer Intimacy: How Social Networking Intermediate/Advanced 202 Making the RITE Decisions Intermediate/Advanced Changes the Dynamics 301 How to Define and Value an IT Service: The Cornerstone of ITSM Intermediate/Advanced 602 Sourcing the Next Wave of IT Workers: Getting Past Denial Intermediate/Advanced 302 Transform Your Support Center From Reactive to Business-Centric Intermediate/Advanced 613 SaaS+ for End-to-End Global Support Advanced 401 Workforce Mobility: Are You Ready for a Virtual Future? Advanced 701 Help Desk Integration with Life Cycle Management Advanced 402 The First Line of Defense: The Support Center’s Role in Cyber-security Advanced 801 Strategy Formulation for Professional Shared-Services Advanced 802 Creating IT Governance Intermediate Support Operations Management For experienced managers (two or more years in a management role) responsible for day-to-day technical support operations, and for experienced service and support professionals preparing for management responsibilities. This track explores the latest approaches to operational efficiency and effectiveness, including process improvement, self-service, knowledge management, change management, proactive support best practices, and more. Pre-1 HDI Support Center Director Intermediate 403 Mind the Gap for Quality Intermediate Pre-3 Knowledge Management Foundations: KCSSM Principles Intermediate 404 Deep Dive into Problem Management Troubleshooting Techniques Intermediate/Advanced Pre-9 Mapping Support Processes: Blueprint for Success Intermediate 503 A Day in the Life of a Mobile Employee Intermediate/Advanced Pre-14 Eliminate Incidents BEFORE They Occur Intermediate 504 Organizational Readiness Intermediate 103 You Can’t Use a Tool to Solve a Process Problem! Novice/Intermediate 603 Image Management: Successfully Marketing Your Help Desk Intermediate/Advanced 104 Knowledge Management Success Factors: A Proven Scenario Intermediate/Advanced 604 Launching a Successful Work-from-Home Program Intermediate/Advanced 203 Problem Management: The Business Life Saver Intermediate 702 Service Desk/Call Center Design All experience levels 204 Taming Your Elevation Processes Intermediate/Advanced 703 Running the Business of IT: Perspectives on Change Management Intermediate/Advanced 303 Managing Off-shoring: How to Balance Cost and Quality Advanced 803 Service Desk Rescue: Root Causes and Success Factors Novice/Intermediate 304 It’s an Incident, Dr. Watson Novice/Intermediate 804 Service Level Management: A Journey of Baby Steps with Big Results Intermediate Essentials for New Support Managers For emerging and rising support managers in undeveloped or evolving technical support organizations. This track features essential concepts, processes, and best practices that provide a foundation for success in your new role. This track will also help refresh experienced managers on the fundamentals of managing a support center or service desk. Managers of both internal and external support organizations with fewer than 50 support professionals will benefit most from this track. Pre-2 HDI Support Center Manager Novice/Intermediate 405 What Managers Need To Know About Process Maturity Novice Pre-5 HDI Support Center Team Lead Novice 505 Making Sense of Service and Operating Level Agreements Novice/Intermediate Pre-6 HDI Desktop Support Technician Novice 605 Project Leadership for Support Center Professionals Novice 105 Five Hallmarks of Help Desk Excellence Novice 704 Strategies for Adopting Self-service and Automation Novice 205 Developing an Effective Service Delivery Model Novice 712 You’re Punishing Your People! Novice/Intermediate 305 Metrics That Matter Novice 805 The New Help Desk Managers Crash Course to Success Novice Metrics and Measurements Measuring performance is a fundamental and critical activity for every effective technical service and support organization. This track delves into what should be measured in your organization, what a key performance indicator is, how to determine if your data says what you think it says, and how to effectively report the most meaningful metrics. Pre-11 Support Center Metrics and Measurements Novice/Intermediate 407 Customer Satisfaction: The Metric That Matters Most Intermediate/Advanced 107 Service Metrics vs. Support Center Operational Metrics Intermediate 507 Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader? Intermediate/Advanced 207 How to Determine Key Performance Indicators Novice/Intermediate 607 A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Metrics Novice/Intermediate 213 Truth in Measuring Intermediate 707 Solve Rate Metrics: Overall, Ability, and Obtainable Intermediate 307 The Hidden Value of KPI Correlations Intermediate/Advanced 807 Making Performance Metrics Matter for Employees Intermediate
  12. 12. april 6-9, 2009Mandalay Bay | las Vegas, nV t r a c k l i s t i n g s Applying ITILThis in-depth track goes well beyond theory to assist in developing a working understanding of the emerging life cycle approach to service and support management. It focuses on how toimplement ITIL: where to begin, how to overcome the roadblocks, and how to adapt the theory into workable strategies for your own organization.Pre-4 ITIL v3 Foundation Novice 406 Why You Aren’t Ready to Write an SLA IntermediatePre-8 Why SLM Is the Key to Your Future Intermediate 413 Marrying Best Practices and ITSM Novice/IntermediatePre-10 Creating an ITIL Service Management Department Intermediate 506 Can True RCA Increase the Bottom Line? IntermediatePre-13 Implementing ITIL: Where Do You Begin? Novice/Intermediate 606 Continual Service Improvement: Strategies and Measurements Intermediate106 I Bought the Books: Now What? Novice/Intermediate 705 Driving IT Support Cost Reduction Intermediate/Advanced113 Making the Case for ITIL Novice/ Intermediate 706 Eliminate the Big Impacts: Leverage Problem Management Intermediate/Advanced206 Implementing Incident and Problem Management Novice/ Intermediate 806 Successfully Integrating Projects with Change and Intermediate/Advanced306 Implementing Change and Configuration Management Novice/Intermediate Release Management Customer FocusThis track, combining practical concepts and skills-based sessions, applies to a variety of organizations and all service and support professionals, regardless of experience level.Topics include creating a service culture, self-service, customer satisfaction, and more. It also explores skills and related techniques managers can use for in-service training back at their office.108 Creating a World-class Service Organization All experience levels 508 If You Work on the Phones, You Must… Novice208 A How-to Guide for Implementing Customer Satisfaction Programs Intermediate/Advanced 608 How to Increase Acceptance and Empower Your Novice/Intermediate308 A Crash Course in Service Level, Quality and Productivity Novice/Intermediate Customers with Self-Service313 Speed Thrills Intermediate 708 From Disdain to Delight: 12 Steps to Creating a Intermediate/Advanced408 Energizing Your Service Desk with a Self-service Portal Intermediate/Advanced Customer Service Culture410 Conversations with Customers: Best and Worst Moments Novice Human FactorsThis track will appeal to all attendees, regardless of support segment or organizational perspective, and is for anyone responsible for managing support employees. The track examines key peopleissues related to staffing, resource maximization, performance management, and metrics. It also explores the principles of leadership, team building, motivation, and effective communication.Key-3 Living the Dream All experience levels 409 The Art of Building Bridges All experience levelsKey-5 Mountain – Get Out of My Way! All experience levels 414 Global Training Strategy for World-class Support Intermediate/AdvancedKey-6 Average Is Just Not Good Enough! PERIOD. All experience levels 509 Talking without Words All experience levelsPre-7 The Refreshing Leader All experience levels 510 Leading Change and Neutralizing Resistance in Your Teams All experience levelsPre-12 Build the Best Team: Soup to Nuts Novice/Intermediate 513 Coaching and Mentoring for Improved Performance Novice/IntermediatePre-15 A “More Better” Workplace! Novice/intermediate 609 What Millennial Workers Want: How to Attract and All experience levels109 Recruiting and Developing a High-impact Service Desk Intermediate/Advanced Retain Gen Y Employees110 No Excuse! All experience levels 610 Leadership At All Levels All experience levels209 Four Steps to Improve Hiring Success Intermediate 709 Service Desk Dream Team: Raising Up Team Leads Novice/Intermediate210 Get Switched On! All experience levels 710 Positively Contagious Leadership: The Little Green Man All experience levels309 Bad Hires…How Not To Do That Again! Novice/Intermediate 808 The Games People Play Novice/Intermediate310 ZAP THE GAP All experience levels 809 Growing Your Desk, Your People, and Your Business Presence Intermediate 810 Positively Contagious Leadership: The Little Green Man (Repeat) All experience levels Make It WorkThis unique, interactive track features sessions focused on facilitated discussions, simulations, in-depth Q and A, and rapid-fire “60 Ideas in 60 Minutes”—all designed to help you dive deeperinto new ideas introduced at the conference so you can make them work in your organization. It also features the new “Career Corner” with interactive discussions and personal counseling tohelp you not only manage your career, but develop the skills and attitude you need to get ahead.112 Career Corner: Acquire Skills That Guarantee Success All experience levels 512 60 Ideas in 60 Minutes: Generations A-Z All experience levels212 Join the ITIL Apprentice Challenge, Part 1 Intermediate 612 Career Corner: Your Career Is Not the Path Less Traveled All experience levels312 Join the ITIL Apprentice Challenge, Part 2 Intermediate 812 Collaborate, Create, and Consolidate Your Action Plan All experience levels412 Ask the Experts: Wikis and More All experience levels Applying TechnologyThe concepts and case studies in this track focus on best practices for using support technologies to achieve business objectives. Learn how to select and implement the latest tools andtechnologies. Discover how to leverage wikis, virtual support, and automation to help you realize performance improvements. Take the mystery out of new technologies.Key-4 Futureview: A Look Ahead All experience levels 511 What’s Next? Moving Beyond the Service Desk Intermediate/Advanced111 Selecting Service Desk Software Novice/Intermediate 611 Managing a Support Platform Changeover Intermediate/Advanced114 ITIL v3 Meets Software-as-a-Service Intermediate/Advanced 711 Identity and Access Controls for Continuous Compliance Intermediate/Advanced211 Wikis, Knowledge Management, and Your Support Desk All experience levels 811 Why Did IT Cross the Road?...To Get to Vista Intermediate/Advanced311 Web 3.0 Through the Lens of Today’s Technologies Novice/Intermediate 813 Cost-effective Knowledge Base Solutions Intermediate/Advanced411 Virtualized Support: A New Model for Help Desk Efficiency Advanced
  13. 13. th in w: i , w d ne t l u O eO e th by dr.JodiemoNgeRthth we live and die, thrive and suffer by the numbers in thew i cOntact center. Our representatives receive incentives, bOnuses are handed Out, and recOgnitiOn Of the cOntact center thrOughOut the OrganizatiOn Occurs when it “meets” its numbers.Stop to think about what you really measure because what is measured truly drives the behavior of the representatives,the team managers, the quality team, and the center manager. It also drives the perception of the contact center withinthe organization.We are in the people business, but traditionally contact centers do not have metrics to reflect the people’s perspective.A needed change is occurring and some centers have begun to use the voice of the customer to create CUSTOMERMETRICS to complement their more traditional center metrics and balance out their performance scorecards. Whilemanagement by the numbers is necessary, it alone will not drive the correct behaviors. Key dashboard metrics mustinclude the callers’ perception of the service delivery. It is the customers’ perception of our service that is the metrictruly driving customer satisfaction…and it’s these metrics that motivate people to perform at their best.Insanity in the Contact CenterAs the saying goes, continuing to do the same thing over It is too tempting for a representative to watch the amountand over again while expecting a different outcome is, by of time on the phone and end the call when it comes closedefinition, insanity. Which metrics in your contact center to the AHT target—an ending may be a rushed summarycross over into the realm of insanity? and close or it may be simply hanging up on the customer. This is obviously not the behavior we intend to encourageAs an example, consider Average Handle Time (AHT) as a and the AHT metric does little to tell us if the customerstandard metric in the contact center. In most cases, the experience is satisfactory for callers.management team and team leaders determine AHT goalsfor the general types of calls. All representatives are then Operational metrics alone are generally not representativeheld to that standard, no matter what direction the call may of your customers’ expectations for service delivery. Whattake, or the type of customer on the phone. While we intend is worse is that these metrics reinforce the perception thatto encourage effective call control, this metric teaches the the contact center is a cost center to your organization.representatives to manage the call to that AHT goal number, Productivity is critical, yes, but your position as a strategicwhich does not take the customer and their reason for the weapon to the organization is not secured by focusing onlycall into consideration. Is it insane to expect this goal to on such metrics.contribute to an effective service experience for your callers?
  14. 14. MetricsandMeasurementsStopping the Madness—Add New MetricsFocus your attention on CUSTOMER-centric metrics of your customers. Almost all customer relationshipsto prove the contact center is a competitive weapon are maintained here and many others are built.to be leveraged by the entire organization. It is these The insanity remains in that you are not focusedmeasurements that show the true voice of the customer on metrics that measure relationships and is perpetuatedand the value of the center within the organization, by the fact that you are still using metrics thatmore so than how many or how fast. measure productivity.A credible metrics dashboard is necessary to position Often, the transition is easier said than done.the contact center as a profit center and to create a new Numbers have driven our business for a long timeparadigm as the heart of customer value within the and many have seemingly mastered the way to makeorganization. It is up to the center management team the numbers work to drive efficiency in the center.to promote the center’s value, which will probably be Problem is, we are measuring the wrong things anda new concept for internal focus and marketing. With not taking our relationships into account. Customersthe new measurements in place, and ROI based arguments are not asked how long they are willing to wait to speakin hand, this becomes an easier task. Budgeting for the to a representative, or how long they want to talk to acenter will become more of an exercise in investment representative once they get them on the phone. Werather than cost containment as a new height of awareness have made assumptions and created goals about whatamong other business units grow about how the contact customers want and have built program on top of programcenter is leveraged. to measure these things—never really including the voice of the customer in the process. All the while you areThe contact center is the relationship manager for increasing the perception of being a productivitythe organization and is the company to most, if not all, center—cost center—to the organization.Focus on ValueNow that more contact centers are being recognized as value centers within organizations, it is time to change the metrics toreinforce this new position. So much customer insight is available to the organization through the contact center. Package itup and share it. You need to make it a part of your mission to show the rest of the organization how to leverage your center.Start by measuring success in ways that will assist other parts of the organization to make decisions. Does AHT mean anythingto anyone else in the organization? Probably not. So, identify what numbers will drive change in the organization and start fromthere. Look at the big picture first—what is the organization getting for what they are budgeting for your center(s)? In essence,what is the ROI of the contact center? Look at this number monthly, and then drill it down to a daily measurement.Please note in this formula that you are claimingthe relationship management successes and taking CONTACT CENTER ROIresponsibility for the failures. This is an essential part Based on 250 Seat Contact Centerof the measurement. You cannot create credibilitywithout doing both. The behavior of the group in the {[(% delighted calls x customers served) x avg. revenue per customer] minus [(% dissatisfied calls x customers served) x avg. revenue per customer]}middle cannot be accurately predicted and it can be ————————————————————assumed that the effect of their movement away from Fully Loaded Costs for the Periodyour company or to stay with it has a zero net. {[(.60 x 100,000) x 50] minus [(.05 x 100,000) x 50]} ————————————— x 100 $2,083,333The percent Delighted Calls are 9 or 10 on a 10-point scaleor 8 or 9 on a 9-point scale. Dissatisfied is 3 or less. Contact Center ROI 132%
  15. 15. This new customer metric shows how the center protects Another likely target for relationship effectiveness is the revenue and relationships for the organization. It will also agent. Each and every person representing your company show when the investments outweigh the gains in has a fiduciary responsibility to profitability. Do they customer satisfaction and be indicative of a needed change. understand that concept or has it become lost in the day- This measure will account for investments in technology, to-day operational metric reports that we provide to them? people, and processes and will help identify the profit potential of the center. Not just to you and your staff, but Not all teams or individuals will perform equally. the entire organization as well. The center ROI may show value overall, but the center manager should identify the teams that are performing Use the same calculations to produce a team ROI. well based on the investments it has made. The same Each team is a mini-profit center, or if it is not viewed that applies to each individual agent. This will show, from way, it should be. Give the direction to the team leads to the customer’s point of view, what is working and what manage to a positive ROI. This will create happier teams, is not. Then, the information can be used to identify which will create happier agents… which ultimately leads specific training and coaching efforts needed per team to happier customers. (or individual) to increase the ROI. Another new metric that will pinpoint a customer Agent Peak Performance Index metric and focus training and coaching to include the callers’ perception is the Agent Peak Performance Index. This measure will identify how each individual agent Agent ROI x Accuracy (QM) scores on customer satisfaction. ———————————————————— % Delight Treating Customer as Valued Agent Peak Performance Index By using this index, each agent will be scored by the © Customer Relationship Metrics actual voice of the customer, not just standard metrics. If this index is falling, it raises a red flag to supervisors and trainers that this agent needs some additional coaching or training. The callers will identify agent burnout. Coaching and training budgets can be used most effectively and at the right times for the right agents—thereby increasing the ROI on these programs. The New Cycle 600 Agent Peak Performance Index Begin the focus on customer centric metrics. 550 By using these value proposition measurements, the insanity cycle can be broken. 500 450 Also, keep in mind that these new metrics are not solely for the voice channel. Service delivery from 400 Intervention all channels should have these metrics to identify 350 and build the case for value in the organization. Each channel should be profitable and these 300 measurements will assist with the overall view Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec of the center as a strategic weapon. Jodie Monger, PhD is the President of Customer Relationship Metrics, LC (www.metrics.net) and the inventor or real-time post-call surveying in the contact center industry. Her expertise is in designing and managing customized customer experience research programs (EQM programs). Her new book Survey Pain Relief can be found on Amazon.com. Jodie18 www.ThinkHDI.com I March/April 2009
  16. 16. “HDI has helped me take my help desk from worst-in-class to first-in-class.” — Darien Chimoff, Help Center Manager, Alston & Bird LLP HDI Support Center Services Engage HDI to help you discover your support center’s true strengths and weaknesses! HDI Support Center Certification Audit Achieve recognition for following the HDI Support Center Standard’s Best Practices for Service Management and identify areas for improvement HDI Support Center Maturity Assessment Receive guidance from an onsite assessment of the maturity of your support center based on the HDI Support Center Standard and HDI Support Center Maturity Model NEW Service! HDI Support Center Best Practices Evaluation Receive guidance from an onsite evaluation of the maturity of your support center based on the HDI Support Center Standard NEW Service! HDI Support Center Assisted Evaluation Engage HDI to help you evaluate of the maturity of your support center based on the HDI Support Center Standard (onsite or remote) Darien Chimoff myHDI Title: Help Center Manager Company: Alston & Bird LLP HDI Member Since: August 2000 Local Chapter: President, HDI Atlanta Chapter Certifications: Help Desk Manager, Help Desk Director, Knowledge Center Support Principles, ITIL® Foundation 800.248.5667 | www.T hink H DI.co m /S er vices
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  18. 18. ManagIng a Support Center In DIffICult tIMeS HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH by kellYAckeRmAN-mcLAughLINI have worked for a large corporation and in Focusing on the people, during this time, is really the higher education and it always amazes me that key to succeeding through these challenging times. people think managing a support center in these two vertical markets is drastically different. People If you are a manager or supervisor, it is important now, like to think they are unique…or that where they are is more than ever, to make the staff in the support center vastly different from where others are. feel valued and a part of finding ways to improve processes and operate more efficiently. And, as a support Given the current state of the economy, managing a center staff, it is critical to focus on that personal touch to support center in any market can be difficult…and customer service that makes the customer want to use the the challenges are often the same. There are higher services that you are providing. expectations to provide results with fewer resources HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH in an extremely stressful environment.StaffFinding ways to do more with less has z Professional development does not to see how the position operates inbecome a cliché, however, one of the have to cease because there is limited another environment. In terms ofthings a tough economy forces us to funding. It is important to justify actual training, you can often finddo is to look for ways to operate more the critical needs for professional very low cost alternatives to trainingefficiently and take an internal look at development. Use any dollars you by asking an expert from one of yourour processes and quality of service. do have on the training that you networking circles to present a topicThis is often perceived as a negative. cannot get for free. Often, institutions to your support center staff. ThroughHere are some ideas for helping hosting conferences will offer you my involvement in the HDI Higheryour staff cope through the difficult assistance in writing letters of Education Forum, I have formed someeconomic times: justification. HDI, for example, has great relationships with other support a template of a letter on their Web center managers and directors. I wasz Stay positive! Nothing good can site that allows you to fill in the fortunate enough to have one of those come from being negative. As leaders, information pertinent to you. colleagues from the University of South it is important to model the way The letter can be found at Carolina, Elizabeth Mathis, facilitate with a positive attitude. Don’t forget http://www.ThinkHDI.com/hdi2009 a team building exercise where we to celebrate the teams’ successes! (under the Registration menu, it is worked on our support center mission It does not have to cost a lot of titled “Letter for Approval”). So, are and vision statements. This was a huge money to reward staff for a job well you wondering how you can get hit with the staff and only cost travel done. Letters of recognition from training for free? We often overlook expenses for the facilitator. upper management, small potluck opportunities right in our backyard. celebrations, and personal notes of Partnering with other support centers z Teamwork is essential. IT Services thanks are just a few ways. Helping at another company or institution at Hobart and William Smith Colleges the staff understand how important offers the opportunity for shadowing has taken a very streamlined and they are to success becomes a way to and sharing of information. Your local dynamic organizational approach reinforce that positive behavior. There HDI chapter is a great resource for this utilizing a high performance team are many Web sites that offer creative type of networking. It is great to pair model to build a culture of intense ways to reward employees that have up folks with similar jobs and have collaboration and communication. little or no cost. Some Web sites that I them share time at each other’s work The support center is a fundamental go to for ideas are www.kirkweisler. site. It can also be a great opportunity part of the larger team. We emphasize com, www.bradbartonspeaks.com, if you have someone who is interested the importance of succeeding together and getcreative.krauscreative.com. in growing into a different position and that the reality is that customer
  19. 19. SupportCenterManagement service is not just the responsibility service delivered by the students. z Make sure you understand the of the support center staff, but the And, while we haven’t perfected business goals. Support centers entire IT services organization. As a it, feedback indicates we have made often lose focus of what business leadership team, we have facilitated significant improvements. Most often, functions are being supported. department-wide meetings where we this first impression has nothing to Technology becomes the focus and organize the entire staff into small do with technical knowledge. It’s all we lose sight of what the individual groups. Each group is comprised of about how the customer feels about is trying to accomplish with their members from across the department their interaction with the support technology. Even in higher education, who may not usually interact on a center individual they are speaking which people don’t always consider daily basis. This is done with the with. Often, our customers call us a “business,” it is important to goal of fostering relationships and and have anxiety or apprehension understand what are the high-level team building. Each group was asked about a variety of things. They could goals of the institution. This level to run through customer service be apprehensive about getting good of understanding allows for better scenarios. This opportunity to look at service or they could be anxious prioritization of work coming into scenarios as a team helped reinforce about the task they are trying to the support center. positive behavior and let each person perform. It is the role of the support take away personal learnings on how center to ease that anxiety and Leaders are often born out of tough they can be better team players. The apprehension. Earlier, I mentioned circumstances. Regardless of our role exciting part was the “Aha moments” some Web sites that I find helpful. in the support center, we all have the that several people took away with Kirk Weisler’s Web site offers a ability to demonstrate leadership and them. Things that they realized about “Thought 4 the Day.” There are so be creative in ways to be successful… the group or themselves that they many times that I read this tip and regardless of the circumstances. were willing to share that hadn’t been feel like Kirk can see the situation obvious to them. we are in. I always take something away from his wisdom.I was surprised to learn that thecosmetics industry was born during z Involve your customers in processthe Great Depression. It goes to show improvements. Do you survey yourthat individuals with determination customers? Do you do anythingcan accomplish anything, even when with those survey results? Surveyingtimes are tough. your customers without acting on the results of those surveys is Kelly Ackerman-McLaughlin serves as Director of Operations and TechnicalCustomers meaningless and the customers often Support for Information TechnologyOur customers are pressured see that. This perception of “why are Services at Hobart and William Smithwith doing more with less as well. you asking, when you don’t care?” Colleges. Her team is responsible forThis pressure often gets passed along just makes things worse. Hobart technology support on campus for faculty, staff, and students. This supportto the support center, as the customers and William Smith Colleges has a is delivered via a centralized supportrely on us to help them. Here are a few governance process for both faculty center. Additionally, Kelly oversees theideas for helping our customers manage and administrative staff. These two Colleges Post Office and Print Servicesthrough these difficult economic times: governance bodies are consulted operations. Prior to joining HWS more when making any changes to process. than three years ago, Kelly was the Desktop Service Line Manager forz Making a positive first impression Additionally, I will often personally Eastman Kodak Company. While she is so important. At Hobart and speak with a customer that has has a degree in Journalism, Kelly has William Smith Colleges, students provided either extremely positive a history of technology support in higher staff the frontlines of the support or constructive feedback. This type education having also worked at the University center. Anybody who works in of feedback cannot be provided in of Rochester and Buffalo higher education can appreciate the most surveys. It is really important State College. Kelly is the challenges of using students to staff to have these types of conversations President of the Western frontline operations. Over the past as close to when the feedback and Central NY Local HDI Chapter and is a few years, we have worked very is provided as possible. Never member of the HDI diligently at Hobart and William underestimate the power of a Higher Education Forum. Kelly Smith to improve the quality of personal conversation.
  20. 20. Moving from ITIL ®Version 2 to Version 3 by Julie l.mohr The Information Technology Infrastructure Library or ITIL® is a source of information that is incredibly relevant to the discussion of process implementation or re-engineering. It would be very difficult today to say that you are operating at a high level of efficiency without having implemented many of the processes that are defined and documented within the framework. But ITIL has undergone a major revision since it was initially developed and version 3 is dramatically different than version 2.
  21. 21. ITIL Processes in V2IT Service Management must have a solid foundationto drive long-term value. In version 2 of the framework,the foundation is the Configuration Management process. Service Level ManagementThis is the process where we manage all of theconfiguration items and their relationships. Without this IT Service Security Management Financial Capacity Availability Continuity Management Management Managementcritical process and its repository the Configuration ManagementManagement Database (CMDB), the rest of the ITILprocesses would be inefficient or even unstable—limiting Service Desk Incident Management Problem Management Change Management Release Managementtheir effectiveness to the business. If we view ITIL as a Configuration Managementhouse—then Configuration Management would be thefoundation of the house. The foundation of the house isrequired in order to build the structure and it would be Figure 1 – ITIL Version 2impossible to build a strong first floor of the housewithout the solid foundation. ITIL V2 WeaknessesOn the first floor of the house, we have the ServiceSupport processes of Incident Management, Problem ITIL version 2 has some significant weaknesses.Management, Change Management, and Release First, it is missing some key processes that manyManagement. In version 2 we only have one function, organizations have implemented including Eventthe service desk, and its focus is also within Service Management, Knowledge Management, and AccessSupport. These processes and singular function are Management. But more than just missing processes,all the day-to-day or operational activities that take version 2 attempts to achieve business alignment byplace to support the business. Incident Management soliciting minimal input from the business. Many ofutilizes the service desk to provide a single point of the processes had inputs that required IT to solicitcontact to the business for all issues relating to the information from the business but it lacked a holisticservices that IT provides to the business. Problem approach to understand how IT can strategically integrateManagement seeks to resolve the root cause of itself with the business. The framework did little to helpissues—in order to have a more stable infrastructure. IT understand what information to leverage from theChange Management accepts, assesses, and approves business and how to utilize that information to createchanges to the infrastructure and Release Management better IT alignment. Version 2 was a process-orientedmakes certain that they are efficiently released into the approach and focused on business alignment—but ITenvironment with little disruption to business processes had to do much more than that to create value forand operations. the business.The second floor is Service Delivery—the processes Many consulting companies and ITSM architects builtthat are more strategic in nature that plan for the future ITIL houses—each organization had a process-orientedneeds of the business. These processes—Availability approach starting with the Service Support processes andManagement, Capacity Management, IT Service Continuity over time reaching a higher level of maturity to build inManagement, and Financial Management—are all very the Service Delivery processes. As architects, we built thefocused on creating a higher level of value to the business. same house over and over and what we got was incredibleThe roof of the house is the process that negotiates process efficiency and control but we were all looking forthe levels of required service and ensures that the IT something that elevated IT to the next level—as a strategicorganization is meeting the objectives of the business, advisor and partner of the business.Service Level Management. The front door wouldthen be Security Management—where we ensure theconfidentiality, integrity, and availability of all information.This view of ITIL is depicted in Figure 1.

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