Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Demystifying Lean: Going to Gemba

1,204 views

Published on

This presentation debunks many of the mythologies surrounding the philosohpies and methodologies of Lean. Starting with the fundamental premise that value is defined by the customer, the presentation reviews the principles of Lean in the context of the 21st century economy, and what this means to you and your organization. Connect your organization’s day-to-day activities with Lean concepts and “learn to see” in ways that fundantally transform how you lead, manage, and work.

  • Be the first to comment

Demystifying Lean: Going to Gemba

  1. 1. Demystifying Lean Muda 無駄 Muri 無理 Mura 斑 (Waste) (Overburden) (Unevenness) { Going to Gemba 現場 Scott Leek Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC LeanUXDenver, September 20, 2012© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  2. 2.  People agree more about where Lean came from than how to define it… unfortunately both are wrong History of Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  3. 3.  The origin of Lean is the “Toyota Production System”  The term Lean was first used in the article "Triumph of the Lean Production System” (Krafcik)  Popularized in the book The Machine That Changed the World History of Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  4. 4.  The Japanese did not invent Lean as much as they perfected it, at least to a level…  Preceded by a long history of human endeavor to be responsible Shepherds of Earth’s resources History of Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. Caveman (Prehistoric) • Frequently starved • Minor injury or infection often fatal • Had enough of nothing • Knew the value of everything • Wasted virtually nothing Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  6. 6. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) • Popularized a common sense approach to waste reduction in Poor Richards Almanac • Recognized the waste related to unnecessary inventory in The Way to Wealth • Cited by Henry Ford as an influence in his business practices Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 – March 21, 1915) • Father of Scientific Management 1. Base work methods on a scientific study of the tasks 2. Select, train, and develop employees rather than leaving them to train themselves 3. Provide detailed work instruction and supervision 4. Divide work between managers applying scientific management principles to planning the work and workers to perform the tasks Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  8. 8. Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) • Founder of the Ford Motor Company • Invented the assembly line and mass production • Implemented an early version of what became known as Just-in- Time • Doubled employee wages to reduce turnover and allow employees to afford his automobiles Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. Taiichi Ohno (February 29, 1912 – May 28, 1990) • Father of the Toyota Production System • Recognized the scheduling of work should not be driven by sales or production targets but by actual sales (takt time, flow, pull) Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  10. 10. Shigeo Shingo (1909 - 1990) • A leading expert on manufacturing practices and the Toyota Production System • Shingo Prize recognizes world- class, lean organizations • Invented the tools of Poka- yoke (mistake proofing) and SMED (single-minute exchange of die) Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  11. 11. People doing work… enabled to do the right thing. (Prehistoric – Present) Contributor’s to Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  12. 12.  Doing more with less What Lean IS NOT!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  13. 13.  Incessant measurement (time & motion studies) What Lean IS NOT!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  14. 14.  Crowding people & equipment What Lean IS NOT!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  15. 15.  Efficiency above all else What Lean IS NOT!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  16. 16.  Complicated & mysterious What Lean IS NOT!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  17. 17.  Defining value from the customer’s perspective What Lean IS!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  18. 18.  Defining value from the customer’s perspective What Lean IS!© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  19. 19. Value Centered Design*  Continuous improvement of Enterprise Objectives value by eliminating waste Offering Return on Investment Delivery and creating flow Product Service Value Process Channel Return on Experience Content Fulfillment Customer Experience What Lean IS! * Adopted from Harry Nieber at http://blogs.infosupport.com/value-centered-design/© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  20. 20. Create Reduce Flow Waste  Symbiotic relationship between waste and flow Reduce Create Waste Flow What Lean IS! * Adopted from Harry Nieber at http://blogs.infosupport.com/value-centered-design/© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  21. 21.  Using the customer’s definition of value, all waste is eliminated from the Value Stream MUDA Lean & Waste© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  22. 22.  Transportation Each time a product or person is moved there is a cost and risk (damage, loss, spoilage, delay, et cetera) Waste (Muda 無駄) “The Flying Cadillac”© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  23. 23.  Inventory Represents a capital outlay that is not producing income and comes in the form of raw material, work-in- progress, or finished goods Waste (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  24. 24.  Motion Results in damage to equipment (wear and tear) or people (repetitive stress injuries) who are in the process of producing the product or service Waste (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  25. 25.  Waiting Items waiting to be worked on (WIP) or people waiting Waste (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  26. 26.  Overproduction Producing more than is needed in a given time Waste (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  27. 27.  Over-processing Completing more work than is required Waste (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  28. 28.  Defects Products or services not meeting requirements, necessitates reworking, disposal, adjustment, or concession Waste (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  29. 29.  Transportation  Inventory  Motion  Waiting  Overproduction  Over-processing  Defects The Seven Wastes (Muda 無駄)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  30. 30. Create Reduce Flow Waste  Symbiotic relationship between waste and flow Reduce Create Waste Flow What Lean IS! * Adopted from Harry Nieber at http://blogs.infosupport.com/value-centered-design/© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  31. 31.  Synchronizing the pace of the process to the pace of customer demand Creating Flow (Muri 無理 Mura 斑)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  32. 32. Takt Time  Pace required to match customer demand  Available Time ÷ Demand  Drumbeat Creating Flow (Muri 無理 Mura 斑)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  33. 33. Point Efficiency  Processes operated to optimize individual performance  Guarantees sub-optimization and waste in the system Creating Flow (Muri 無理 Mura 斑)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  34. 34. System Efficiency  Processes operated to work together to the drumbeat of Takt Time  Minimizes waste and optimizes value defined by the customer Creating Flow (Muri 無理 Mura 斑)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  35. 35. Some Tools for Creating Flow  5S  Standard Work, Work Balancing & Pull  Work Cells  Batch Size Reduction  Change-over/setup Time Reduction  Overall Equipment Effectiveness  Kaizen/Rapid Improvement Events Creating Flow (Muri 無理 Mura 斑)© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  36. 36. Now What? { Some things you might do* * Spear, Steven J., “Learning to Lead at Toyota,” Harvard Business Review, May 2004.© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  37. 37. “There is no substitute for direct observation”  The place for direct observation is:  Where work is done  Wherever there is a customer experience  Going to Gemba (現場)  The knowledge needed for improvement is seldom found in a conference room Taking Action© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  38. 38. “Proposed changes should be structured as an experiment”  Use of the Scientific Method  A hypothesis, a plan to test the hypothesis, objective criteria and data to accept, reject or modify the hypothesis, action  The value of knowledge is judged based on its ability to correctly predict, an increased ability to predict increases the degree of belief (confidence) in the knowledge Taking Action© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  39. 39. “Workers and managers should experiment as frequently as possible”  Quick simple experiments  Sequential building of knowledge  Advances knowledge but manages risk  Encourages more (appropriate) risk taking Taking Action© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  40. 40.  Busy and effective are not synonymous  Tools and techniques are means, not ends  Reduce waste and improve flow  Improve flow and reduce waste  Define simple measures to evaluate results  Value is defined by the customer, not you  Continual improvement and respect Demystifying Lean© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.
  41. 41. Questions© 2012 Sigma Consulting Resources, LLC. All rights reserved.

×