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SCC 2014 - The People, the People, the People: Engaging under-served audiences

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He aha te mea nui o te ao
What is the most important thing in the world?

He tangata, he tangata, he tangata
It is the people, it is the people, it is the people

This Maori proverb emphasises that people are the most important thing in the world: a concept we will explore in this session serving as a reminder of the importance of tailoring engagement towards your audience’s needs. We will present findings from research commissioned by the Wellcome Trust, which looked at reaching young people from low socio-economic backgrounds, alongside research commissioned by the British Science Association exploring how to include under-represented audiences in National Science and Engineering Week. Comparisons with other cultures will be presented by the University of the West of England, with a case study of engagement with Maori in a New Zealand science festival.

Speakers: Mat Hickman (Wellcome Trust), Hema Teji (British Science Association), Laura Fogg Rogers (University of the West of England), Chair: Karen Folkes (BIS)

Published in: Science, Education, Technology
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SCC 2014 - The People, the People, the People: Engaging under-served audiences

  1. 1. The People, the People, the People Engaging under-served audiences Mat Hickman - @mathickman Hema Teji Laura Fogg-Rogers - @laurafoggrogers Chair: Karen Folkes - @Karen_Afolk #SciComm14 #SciComm14
  2. 2. Introduction www.britishscienceassociation.org Hema Teji Manager of Regional Programmes hemateji@britishscienceassociation.org
  3. 3. 2014 •Event estimate, 2,363 •Attendees estimate, 620,000 •Resource downloads, 78,342 •Home website page views , 104,000 www.britishscienceassociation.org National Science & Engineering Week 2013 Kick Start Grants • 103,370 pupils and students were involved in NSEW activities •48% high proportion of pupils eligible for school meals •34% high proportion of pupils from BAME backgrounds •18% were in remote and rural locations
  4. 4. Audience development 1. Literature review 2. Focus groups 3. Case studies of best practice 4. Fieldwork sampling www.britishscienceassociation.org
  5. 5. • People enduring socio-economic hardship regardless of age, gender or ethnicity • Specific ethnic groups – Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Black British • Women and Girls www.britishscienceassociation.org Literature review
  6. 6. www.britishscienceassociation.org Fieldwork sampling Categories Groups     Affluent Achievers Lavish Lifestyles Executive Wealth Mature Money     Rising Prosperity City Sophisticates Career Climbers     Comfortable Communities Countryside Communities Successful Suburbs Steady Neighbourhoods Comfortable Seniors Starting Out     Financially Stretched Student Life Modest Means Striving Families Poorer Pensioners     Urban Adversity Young Hardship Struggling Estates Difficult Circumstances Each ACORN Category is sub-divided into a number of Groups and subsequent Types which provide even greater detail and granularity. To find detailed descriptions of ACORN Categories, Groups and Types, please visit http://acorn.caci.co.uk/ and follow the link ‘ACORN User Guide’. ACORN Categories were assigned based on respondents’ postcode data
  7. 7. www.britishscienceassociation.org Fieldwork sampling: headline findings On average, 68% of respondents were attending in families with children, in particular with 5-11 year olds. On average, 36%were motivated to attend by children’s education. 14% were brought by others and a significant proportion were ‘just passing’. Respondents were most commonly aged 35-44(28%), or 25-34(22%). Urban Prosperity and Financially Stretched respondents were more likely than the other segments to be in the 16-24 age range. (14%-15%) The Urban Adversity and Financially Stretched segments were more likely than other segments to be attending with friends (16%) 8%of the Urban Adversity segment was from non-white ethnic groups (slightly higher than the proportion amongst other segments) Hands on activitiesare of prime interest to Urban Adversity, followed by Festivals/ Family Days and Exhibitions / Displays Open Days / Toursare also a key driver of Urban Adversity attendance Word of mouthwas the most influential promotional channel for all segments, followed by NSEW leaflet/poster and passing by the venue On average, 73% of respondents (66% of the Urban Adversity segment) were first- time attendees at National Science & Engineering Week
  8. 8. www.britishscienceassociation.org Fieldwork sampling: survey respondents’ ACORN composition NSEW 2014 Survey Respondents’ ACORN Composition ACORN Category % Survey Respondents % GB Population Difference INDEX Affluent Achievers 32.3 22.6 9.7 143 Rising Prosperity 7.6 9.0 -1.4 84 Comfortable Communities 23.7 27.1 -3.5 87 Financially Stretched 24.8 24.1 0.7 103 Urban Adversity 11.7 17.2 -5.5 68
  9. 9. www.britishscienceassociation.org Fieldwork sampling: ethnicity NSEW 2014 Survey Respondents’ Ethnicity White Mixed Asian / Asian British Black / Black British Chinese Other Affluent Achievers 97.1% 1.7% 0.6% NO DATA NO DATA 0.6% Rising Prosperity 95.0% 2.5% NO DATA NO DATA 2.5% NO DATA Comfortable Communities 96.8% NO DATA 3.2% NO DATA NO DATA NO DATA Financially Stretched 93.8% 2.3% 1.5% 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% Urban Adversity 92.0% 3.2% 3.2% 1.6% NO DATA NO DATA ALL 95.5% 1.7% 1.7% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4%
  10. 10. www.britishscienceassociation.org Next steps: The engagement cycle 6-step process to drive engagement
  11. 11. Who do you think are your under- served audiences? Why do you think you should engage with them? www.britishscienceassociation.org hema.teji@britishscienceassociation.org Activity
  12. 12. Experiments in Engagement Engaging with young people from disadvantaged backgrounds Mat Hickman | Wellcome Trust m.hickman@wellcome.ac.uk @WTeducation [newsletter link]
  13. 13. Practical outcomes •A better understanding of the scope of informal learning: • understanding • behaviour • attitudes •Better understanding of how to evaluate the impact of informal science learning •Best practice in reaching deprived learners schools and families •Best practice in linking informal and formal learning.
  14. 14. Underserved groups • Under 5s • Adults • Lower socio- economic groups • Commissioned follow-up research with young people to explore what they would most engage with or value
  15. 15. Methodology Interviews with: •young people aged 9 to 19 in schools or youth organisations •teachers/youth workers responsible for the young people •parents • Interviews in • London • Birmingham • Yorkshire and • Glasgow • Total of • 93 young people • 16 teachers/youth workers and • 16 parents
  16. 16. KEY FINDINGS
  17. 17. Diversity There is a large diversity present within low SES families, ranging from those highly engaged, active and aspirational to those very disengaged. But there are a number of emergent themes: •Ethnicity •Family make-up •Level of parental support •Influence of community and school environment
  18. 18. Attitudes to Science “[Science] makes me feel bubbly, I don’t know why!” “I wrote ‘half and half’. It depends what you are doing.” I don’t really like science to be honest, but I love experiments I like doing practicals, I don’t like writing a lot but I like doing practicals. Doing it yourself rather than watching. The future does depend on science “It’s dull, proper dull.” “I don’t like it because I don’t know the words they use.” “I want to be a doctor but I don’t like science, that’s so weird!”
  19. 19. Attitudes to Science “[Science] makes me feel bubbly, I don’t know why!” “I wrote ‘half and half’. It depends what you are doing.” I don’t really like science to be honest, but I love experiments I like doing practicals, I don’t like writing a lot but I like doing practicals. Doing it yourself rather than watching. The future does depend on science “It’s dull, proper dull.” “I don’t like it because I don’t know the words they use.” “I want to be a doctor but I don’t like science, that’s so weird!”
  20. 20. Attitudes to Science “[Science] makes me feel bubbly, I don’t know why!” “I wrote ‘half and half’. It depends what you are doing.” I don’t really like science to be honest, but I love experiments I like doing practicals, I don’t like writing a lot but I like doing practicals. Doing it yourself rather than watching. The future does depend on science “It’s dull, proper dull.” “I don’t like it because I don’t know the words they use.” “I want to be a doctor but I don’t like science, that’s so weird!”
  21. 21. Attitudes to Science “[Science] makes me feel bubbly, I don’t know why!” “I wrote ‘half and half’. It depends what you are doing.” I don’t really like science to be honest, but I love experiments I like doing practicals, I don’t like writing a lot but I like doing practicals. Doing it yourself rather than watching. The future does depend on science “It’s dull, proper dull.” “I don’t like it because I don’t know the words they use.” “I want to be a doctor but I don’t like science, that’s so weird!”
  22. 22. Attitudes to Science “[Science] makes me feel bubbly, I don’t know why!” “I wrote ‘half and half’. It depends what you are doing.” I don’t really like science to be honest, but I love experiments I like doing practicals, I don’t like writing a lot but I like doing practicals. Doing it yourself rather than watching. The future does depend on science “It’s dull, proper dull.” “I don’t like it because I don’t know the words they use.” “I want to be a doctor but I don’t like science, that’s so weird!”
  23. 23. Influencers on attitudes to science • Gender • Ethnicity • Age • School environment • Role of the science teacher • Parental attitudes to science • Religion When I was in years 7 and 8 we dissected so many things but in year 10 its just boring. It’s just work, work, work, work. Tests, books, you revise that, you do a test, books again. Even the practicals lead to a test!
  24. 24. Engagement with activities • Wide range • Fewer structured leisure time activities • After school clubs • Sport • Unlikely to visit museums and galleries, heritage sites and public libraries • Few young people, particularly in secondary schools, visited museums etc., even at weekends or holidays • The number of free or low cost activities outside of school was low, or unattractive to young people
  25. 25. Engagement with science • Most did not mention science-related activities • Television is the main source of in-home informal science experiences • Visits to, e.g. science centres, typically arranged by schools • Visits tended to be for younger children • Tended to be one-off • Repeat visits rare, except for younger siblings “If you do it for one you have to do it for the others, and we can’t afford that.” (Parent)
  26. 26. Influencers on activities they do • Friendship • Enjoyment • Being in control • Increased self esteem • Incentives to participate • Parental support/family involvement If my friends didn’t go to the YMCA then I wouldn’t go on my own, don’t want to be billy no mates Success breeds success, they keep coming because they are doing well. If they fail then they don’t want to come back. These kids have enough knocks in life to deal with.
  27. 27. Recommendations 1. Know your audience and objectives 2. Engage a champion and be mindful of family influence • Not celebrities 1. Ensure the activity is young person-led • Not too academic 1. Ensure the activity is relevant and pitched at the right level 2. Invest in long-term relationships for maximum impact
  28. 28. Recommendations 6. Make it practical and interactive 7. Facilitate socialising with friends 8. Be financially and geographically accessible • In the community, not just giving ‘access’ to your activity 6. Celebrate and reward success 7. Communicate carefully and through trusted channels • Not science! Not celebrities
  29. 29. Recommendations 2. A desire for an online central resource system for sharing informal science knowledge and tools was expressed 1. Funding processes need to be developed in a way that allows activities to be led by young people
  30. 30. WHAT’S NEXT…
  31. 31. Activity 1. Know your audience and objectives 2. Engage a champion and be mindful of family influence 3. Ensure the activity is young person-led 4. Ensure the activity is relevant and pitched at the right level 5. Invest in long-term relationships for maximum impact 6. Make it practical and interactive 7. Facilitate socialising with friends 8. Be financially and geographically accessible 9. Celebrate and reward success 10.Communicate carefully and through trusted channels How will you engage with your underserved audiences? m.hickman@wellcome.ac.uk
  32. 32. Teenagers as Agents of Change: Engaging Māori in Brain Awareness Week Laura Fogg Rogers laura.foggrogers@uwe.ac.uk
  33. 33. Know your Audience!
  34. 34. Social constructionism Genis Carreras, 2011 VS
  35. 35. Rangahau Māori Positivism: Science is Truth The truth is out there Tangata whenua People of the land knowledgeVS Social constructionism: we co-construct the truth
  36. 36. Brain Day • Science festival format • 3000 attendees • 80% rate lectures as very appealing and most useful
  37. 37. Co-construction of the brain Māori make up 2% of the audience, but 17% of the NZ population WHY? For Māori, the brain is tapu (sacred) as the seat of the soul Scientific research is done by Westerners with a Western ideology of scientific detachment Research is viewed as done ON Māori, not WITH or BY them
  38. 38. Health literacy Engagement is essential to: raise aspirations in science increase involvement in research reduce health inequalities Māori are one of NZ’s most deprived social groups disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease and diabetes
  39. 39. Teenagers as agents of change
  40. 40. Students as Researchers  Māori Advisory Board  Whaea advisor  Six schools, 44 students  11 scientist mentors  100 family members
  41. 41. Feedback in an oral culture Consider alternative methods of evaluation to fit audience needs - video messages suited our storytelling cultures
  42. 42. Engaging with under-served audiences Issues Different ways of viewing the world Historical mistrust of science and scientists Power imbalances Health inequalities Learning points Respect other cultures Find gatekeepers or bridges into the community Co-construct your meaning together Find a topic that motivates you both and work towards changing it together
  43. 43. Teenagers as Agents of Change: Engaging Māori in Brain Awareness Week Laura Fogg Rogers laura.foggrogers@uwe.ac.uk
  44. 44. Breakout 1. Evaluation 2. Partnership 3. Institutional change 4. Networks m.hickman@wellcome.ac.uk hemateji@britishscienceassociation.org laura.foggrogers@uwe.ac.uk

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