Principal Leadership for the Common Core Webinar Presenation

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How can school principals and other educational leaders and administrators help their schools implement the Common Core State Standards? In this webinar, Dr. Lisa Leith discusses ways that everyone can be involved to effectively use the Common Core Standards to help increase and track student achievement.

View the full recording of the webinar at http://www.schoolimprovement.com/resources/webinars/leadership-for-the-common-core/

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  • Within every implementation model, there are some key competencies and resources that building leaders will need to gain if they are to successfully lead their school communities into the new age of the Common Core: A clear understanding of the rationale behind the decision to adopt the Common Core. Great school leaders care deeply about the educational outcome of every one of their students. Believing there will be life-long benefits for students because they will be better prepared for college and career success will inspire enthusiasm for leading this, sometimes difficult, work. Strategies and resources for developing teacher awareness about and teacher capacity for creating and deploying standards-based lesson plans. Deep understanding of the processes of unwrapping the standards including facilitation of teacher collaboration around curriculum mapping, creating thematic units, constructing pacing guides, aligning lesson plans, and designing formative assessments.Systems for evaluating evidences of effective standards-based education, for incorporating a standards-based lens during classroom walk-throughs, teacher observations, and formal staff evaluations.   Perhaps most important, yet most straightforward to accomplish:  Principals need to get to know the standards. A critical principal role in implementing the standards change process is to facilitate powerful conversations regarding what the new standards indicate students should know and be able to do by the time they enter and by the time they leave each grade level. To do this, principals need to become intimately familiar with the organization, scope, depth and purpose of the Common Core standards for both English Language Arts and mathematics.
  • IN terms of college success, text complexity was at least as important as higher order thinking skills such as inferencing
  • CONSEQUENCE: TOO MANY STUDENTS READING AT A LOW LEVEL—BELOW COLLEGE PROFICIENCY
  • Creating a school-wide community of support for students; • Providing students a “math support” class during the school day; • After-school tutoring; • Extended class time (or blocking of classes) in mathematics; and • Additional instruction during the summer.Watered-down courses which leave students uninspired to learn, unable to catch up to their peers and unready for success in postsecondary courses or for entry into many skilled professions upon graduation from high school are neither necessary nor desirable. The results of not providing students the necessary supports they need to succeed in high school are well-documented. Too often, after graduation, such students attempt to continue their education at 2- or 4-year postsecondary institutions only to find they must take remedial courses, spending time and money master- ing high school level skills that they should have already acquired. This, in turn, has been documented to indicate a greater chance of these students not meeting their postsecondary goals, whether a certificate program, two- or four- year degree. As a result, in the workplace, many career pathways and advancement may be denied to them. To ensure students graduate fully prepared, those who enter high school underprepared for high school mathematics courses must receive the support they need to get back on course and graduate ready for life after high school.Furthermore, research shows that allowing low-achieving students to take low-level courses is not a recipe for aca- demic success (Kifer, 1993). The research strongly suggests that the goal for districts should not be to stretch the high school mathematics standards over all four years. Rather, the goal should be to provide support so that all students can reach the college and career ready line by the end of the eleventh grade, ending their high school career with one of several high-quality mathematical courses that allows students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the college- and career-ready standards.With the Common Core State Standards Initiative comes an unprecedented ability for schools, districts, and states to collaborate. While this is certainly the case with respect to assessments and professional development programs, it is also true for strategies to support struggling and accelerated students. The Model Course Pathways in Mathematics are intended to launch the conversation, and give encouragement to all educators to collaborate for the benefit of our states’ children.
  • Creating a school-wide community of support for students; • Providing students a “math support” class during the school day; • After-school tutoring; • Extended class time (or blocking of classes) in mathematics; and • Additional instruction during the summer.Watered-down courses which leave students uninspired to learn, unable to catch up to their peers and unready for success in postsecondary courses or for entry into many skilled professions upon graduation from high school are neither necessary nor desirable. The results of not providing students the necessary supports they need to succeed in high school are well-documented. Too often, after graduation, such students attempt to continue their education at 2- or 4-year postsecondary institutions only to find they must take remedial courses, spending time and money master- ing high school level skills that they should have already acquired. This, in turn, has been documented to indicate a greater chance of these students not meeting their postsecondary goals, whether a certificate program, two- or four- year degree. As a result, in the workplace, many career pathways and advancement may be denied to them. To ensure students graduate fully prepared, those who enter high school underprepared for high school mathematics courses must receive the support they need to get back on course and graduate ready for life after high school.Furthermore, research shows that allowing low-achieving students to take low-level courses is not a recipe for aca- demic success (Kifer, 1993). The research strongly suggests that the goal for districts should not be to stretch the high school mathematics standards over all four years. Rather, the goal should be to provide support so that all students can reach the college and career ready line by the end of the eleventh grade, ending their high school career with one of several high-quality mathematical courses that allows students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the college- and career-ready standards.With the Common Core State Standards Initiative comes an unprecedented ability for schools, districts, and states to collaborate. While this is certainly the case with respect to assessments and professional development programs, it is also true for strategies to support struggling and accelerated students. The Model Course Pathways in Mathematics are intended to launch the conversation, and give encouragement to all educators to collaborate for the benefit of our states’ children.
  • Principal Leadership for the Common Core Webinar Presenation

    1. 1. This webinar was held on May 3, 2012.Watch the recording of this webinar athttp://www.schoolimprovement.com/resources/w Principal Leadershipebinars/leadership-for-the-common-core/ for the Common Core: Synthesize, Prioritize, M aximize! Dr. Lisa Leith ©2012 School Improvement Network
    2. 2. Essential Questions1. How should principals prioritize the Common Core work in light of multiple ongoing initiatives?2. How can principals support Common Core learning environments where failure is not predictable along socio-economic or racial lines?3. Why does text complexity matter and how can teachers effectively select appropriate text?5. What “look-fors” or evidences of Common Core practice could be observed duringwalkthroughs?© 2011 School Improvement Network
    3. 3. Common Core Leadership Strategy To combine multiple SYNTHESIZE and separate elements into a coherent whole PRIORITIZE To arrange in order of relative importance MAXIMIZE To make the most of and get the highest value from© 2011 School Improvement Network
    4. 4. The Mission TEACHER COMMON PRACTICE 100% CORE STANDARDS STUDENT READY ENGAGEMENT ROBUST LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT© 2011 School Improvement Network
    5. 5. The Mission 100% COMMON READY CORE 100% TEACHER PRACTICESTANDARDS READY STUDENT ENGAGEMENT ROBUST LEARNING HIGH ACHIEVEMENT© 2011 School Improvement Network
    6. 6. Principal Mission PRINCIPAL TEACHER PRACTICE LEADERSHIP STUDENT 100% COMMON CORE ENGAGEMENT STANDARDS TEACHER QUALITY READY ROBUST LEARNING RTI HIGH ACHIEVEMENT LITERACY PLC’s 100% ASSESSMENT READY EQUITY© 2011 School Improvement Network
    7. 7. Prioritizing the Work Mental Model for Educational Decision Making LESS OPPORTUNITY CHOICE MORE OPPORTUNITY Mica Pollack, PhD Harvard University© 2011 School Improvement Network
    8. 8. Serving the WHOLE Child • Relationship • Relevance • Safety • Self Efficacy • Comfort • Hope • Laughter • Optimism • Expectation • Vision Emotion Belief Intellect or • Aptitude Cognitive Motivation • Cognition Capacity • Cause & Effect • Memory • Hierarchy of Needs • Reasoning • Engagement • Critical Thinking • Future Focus • Creativity© 2011 School Improvement Network
    9. 9. • Relevance • Relationship • Self Efficacy • Safety • Hope • Comfort • Optimism • Laughter Emotion Belief • Vision • Expectation Intellect • Aptitude • Cognition Motivation • Memory • Reasoning • Hierarchy of • Critical Thinking Needs • Creativity • Cause & Effect • Engagement • Future Focus© 2011 School Improvement Network
    10. 10. How can CC support success for all? STUDENT SUCCESS FACTORS COMMON CORE IMPACT Focuses conversations Authentic relationships Offers clear targets for ALL Student-centered Flexible content (CHOICE) Culturally Responsive High expectations High expectations Rigorous & Engaging Rigorous & Engaging 21st century learning Relevant Collaboration Collaborative Learning Progression Developmentally appropriate HOT Skills Future-focused Emphasis on CC Readiness© 2011 School Improvement Network
    11. 11. 5 Steps to Common Core SUCCESS 1. Messaging & Awareness 2. Reference the Source 3. Support Learning Progressions 4. Make Explicit Connections 5. Empower Teachers and Students© 2011 School Improvement Network
    12. 12. Assemble these tools A. Copy of ELA & Math Common Core Standards Appendices A & B of the ELA Standards for Mathematical Practice List of Anchor Standards & CCR Standards B. Wagner’s list of 21st Century Skills C. BLOOMS new taxonomy D. HOT VERBS List E. Standards-based lesson plan format F. Your professional expertise G. A vision for the success of every child© 2011 School Improvement Network
    13. 13. FAQuestion How can I design curriculum when I don’t know what the new tests will look like?© 2011 School Improvement Network
    14. 14. CC Alignment© 2011 School Improvement Network
    15. 15. FAQuestion What curriculum should we use?© 2011 School Improvement Network
    16. 16. Start Here© 2011 School Improvement Network
    17. 17. New Rules of Engagement 1. The Common Core Standards define a framework for engagement with the curriculum that you already teach 2. The VERBS within the Common Core Standards define Higher Order Thinking skills students will need to apply as they explore content in new ways 3. The Common core Standards define College and Career readiness skills to support student success across curriculum, content, and context© 2011 School Improvement Network
    18. 18. At the Heart of the COMMON CORE… 21st Century Skills 1. Critical thinking and problem solving 2. Collaboration and leadership 3. Agility and adaptability 4. Effective oral and written communication 5. Initiative and entrepreneurialism 6. Analyzing and accessing information 7. Curiosity and imagination© 2011 School Improvement Network
    19. 19. At the heart of the COMMON CORE . . . Higher Order Thinking Bloom’s New Taxonomy© 2011 School Improvement Network
    20. 20. At the heart of the COMMON CORE . . . Higher Order Thinking Bloom’s New Taxonomy ELA CCR.8 DELINEATE AND EVALUATE THE ARGUMENT AND SPECIFIC CLAIMS IN A TEXT INCLUDING THE VALIDITY OF THE REASONING AS WELL AS THE RELEVANCE AND SUFFICIENCY OF THE EVIDENCE.© 2011 School Improvement Network
    21. 21. Designing Performance Tasks within Blooms Taxonomy Invent a solution Consider evidence Discuss cause & effect Propose a solution Explain the reasons List the types© 2011 School Improvement Network
    22. 22. HIGHER ORDER THINKING Verbs Classify Estimate Communicate Evaluate Compare Contrast Explain Convert Identify Integrate Correlate Interpret Create Justify Critique Predict Define Prioritize Demonstrate Prove Differentiate Revise Discover Summarize Distinguish Support© 2011 School Improvement Network
    23. 23. © 2011 School Improvement Network
    24. 24. ELA Appendix A TEXT COMPLEXITY Q. Why does text complexity matter? ACT RESEARCH REPORT 2006 > While college and workplace texts have become more complex over 50 years, K-12 texts have become less demanding. > At college level, students are held accountable for understanding and synthesizing complex texts independently© 2011 School Improvement Network
    25. 25. ELA Appendix A TEXT COMPLEXITY Q2: How do teachers effectively select appropriate text?A 3 PART MODEL FOR MEASURING TEXT COMPLEXITYQUALITATIVE DIMENSIONSQUANTITATIVE DIMENSIONSREADER & TASK CONSIDERATIONS© 2011 School Improvement Network
    26. 26. Text Complexity QUALITATIVE DIMENSIONS • Levels of meaning & purpose • Structure • Language • Conventionality & clarity • Knowledge demands © 2011 School Improvement Network
    27. 27. Text Complexity QUANTITATIVE DIMENSIONS • Word length • Word frequency • Sentence length • Text cohesion Typically measured by computer analysis© 2011 School Improvement Network
    28. 28. Reader & Task Considerations • Students’ ability to read complex text does not always develop in a linear fashion • Standard 10 defines required grade-by- grade growth in students’ ability to read complex text • Students need opportunities to stretch & to experience the satisfaction of fluent reading • Students’ motivation, knowledge, and experiences: Students deeply interested in a given topic may engage more deeply with texts on that subject© 2011 School Improvement Network
    29. 29. Appendix B Table of Contents© 2011 School Improvement Network
    30. 30. Sample Performance Tasks After listening to L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, students describe the characters of Dorothy, Auntie Em, and Uncle Henry, the setting of Kansas prairie and major events such as the cyclone. RL1.3 Students (with prompting and support from the teacher) when listening to Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House in the Big Woods as questions about the events that occur (such as the encounter with the bear) and answer by offering key details drawn from the text. RL1.1 Students identify the points at which different characters are telling the story in the Finn Family Moomintroll by Tove Jansson RL 1.6 Students identify words and phrases within Molly Bang’s The Paper Crane that appeal to the senses and suggest the feelings of happiness experienced by the own of the restaurant (eg, clapped, played, loved, overjoyed) RL1.4© 2011 School Improvement Network
    31. 31. Designing Performance Tasks Recommended Follow-up Activity • LOCATE APPENDIX B in ELA Standards http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf • 1. Explore Stories, Poetry and Informational Texts • 2. Notice grade level groupings • 3. Compare Sample Performance Task to the Standard the task references • 4. Choose 1 text sample • 5. Create a PERFORMANCE Lesson Plan using Template© 2011 School Improvement Network
    32. 32. © 2011 School Improvement Network
    33. 33. Standards for Mathematical Practice 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them 2. Reason abstractly & quantitatively 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others 4. Model with mathematics 5. Use appropriate tools strategically 6. Attend to precision 7. Look for & make use of structure 8. Look for & express regularity in repeated reasoning ASK “WHAT DO MATHEMATICIANS DO?”© 2011 School Improvement Network
    34. 34. Math Standards Appendix A “Create a school-wide community of support for students • Provide students a “math support” class during the school day • After-school tutoring • Extended class time (or blocking of classes) in mathematics • Additional instruction during the summer”© 2011 School Improvement Network
    35. 35. Math Standards Appendix A “Create a school-wide community of support for TEACHERS • Provide teachers a “math support” class during the school day • After-school tutoring • Additional instruction during the summer” RESOURCES Gates Math Design Collaborative www.mathreasoninginventory.com© 2011 School Improvement Network
    36. 36. LEARNING PROGRESSION A sequenced set of aligned standards that students master in order to graduate prepared for life beyond school© 2011 School Improvement Network
    37. 37. ?© 2011 School Improvement Network
    38. 38. ELA Learning Progression Reading Standards for Literature K-5 Kindergarten students: Grade 1 students: Grade 2 students: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. With prompting and 7. Use illustrations and details 7. Use information gained support, describe the in a story to describe from the illustrations and relationship between its characters, setting, or words in a print or digital text illustrations and the story in events to demonstrate which they appear (e.g., what understanding of its moment in a story an characters, setting, or plot. illustration depicts) 9. With prompting and 9. Compare and contrast 9. Compare and contrast support, compare and the adventures and two or more versions contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in of the same story (e.g., experiences of characters in stories. Cinderella stories) by familiar stories. different authors or from different cultures.© 2011 School Improvement Network
    39. 39. Walkthrough & Observation CC Look-Fors© 2011 School Improvement Network
    40. 40. Graphic Map Example Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5 Grade 5 Standard 5: • Compare & contrast the overall structure (chronology, cause/effect, problem/solu tion) of events, ideas, concepts or information in two or more texts.© 2011 School Improvement Network
    41. 41. Common Core…How? GRAPHIC MAPS Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5 Grade 5 Standard 5: Compare & contrast the overall structure (chronology, cause/effect, pro blem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts or information in two or more texts. www.Inspiration.com© 2011 School Improvement Network
    42. 42. HELPS Successful Teachers…  Take time to know and understand every student’s strengths and needs  Communicate the highest expectations for every student  Set clear goals and targets  Hold students accountable for their behavior and academic progress  Use clear learning progression to drive RTI COMMON CORE STANDARDS 100% Ready: College, Career and Beyond© 2011 School Improvement Network
    43. 43. High Risk to High Achievement Prognosis: Academic Success College & Career Readiness Socially Responsible Student ownership Quality Life & Engagement High Expectations Strong Self-Esteem Cultural ProficiencyTEACHER PROFESSIONAL LEARNINGPoor Prognosis: At Risk© 2011 School Improvement Network
    44. 44. Empowering Students To become proactive rather than reactive… – Requires hope AND optimism* – Requires a sense of empowerment to influence outcomes* – Requires clear expectations and goals – Requires orientation in time – Requires connection between cause and effect *What impact do teacher attitudes, beliefs have on these?© 2011 School Improvement Network
    45. 45. Encouraging Future Focus • Support and track student progress • Speak specific words of affirmation and acceptance • Convey high value through INVESTMENT in their progress • Help students picture a positive future • Help students examine CAUSE AND EFFECT© 2011 School Improvement Network
    46. 46. Common Core Leadership Strategy To combine multipleSYNTHESIZE and separate elements into a coherent wholeCC PD PLC RTI AYP LIT EQUITY TQ&E PRIORITIZE To arrange in order of relative importance FOCUS MAXIMIZE To make the most of and get the highest STUDENT SUCCESS value from© 2011 School Improvement Network
    47. 47. Visit Us Online Call us: 1-800-572-1153 Visit us on the web: www.schoolimprovement.com Visit http://www.schoolimprovement.com/pd360-free-pd/webinars/ to see past recordings and register for future webinars. YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/SchoolImprovementNet Blog: http://schoolimprovementnetwork.blogspot.com Facebook http://www.facebook.com/SchoolImprovementNetwork Twitter: @sinetpd360 LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/school-improvement- network Click here to request more information about Common Core 360, or one of our other innovative products.© 2011 School Improvement Network

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