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What You Need to Know:
Trace and Your Publications
Rachel Radom
Scholarly Communication & Publishing Librarian
Spring 2016
Overview
• What is Trace?
• When would you
use it?
• What is Green
Open Access?
• Benefits of
depositing work in
Trace
• Y...
What is Trace?
• Online archive of institutional research
• UT’s own open repository
• Makes work findable
• Makes work ac...
When should you use Trace?
Whenever you want to share any of the
following:
• Electronic theses or dissertations
• Peer-re...
For Theses & Dissertations
• Submit to Trace
• If desired, request an embargo from the
Graduate School
• Why an embargo?
•...
For Funder Policies
• Most federal funders require public access
to research resulting from grants they fund
• Articles mu...
For Green Open Access
• Gold OA
• Green OA / Delayed OA (12 month embargo)
• Find OA Journals that Follow Best
Practices: ...
What else besides articles?
• Presentations
• White papers
• Chapters
• Artists’ Statements
Be Aware
• You cannot make work public in Trace
unless your publication agreement allows
• Not sure? Check Sherpa/RoMEO
• ...
Benefits of Trace I
• Items in Trace are indexed by Google
Scholar, making your work both findable
and accessible
• More a...
Benefits of Trace II
• Gives access to “potential users in
business, charitable and public sectors,
and to the general pub...
Bigger Questions
• Why don’t you own your own work?
• Does a publisher need the copyright? No!
• Can you retain your copyr...
Notes to Researchers
• Seek copyright permission for reuse of
figures, tables, and the like (2-4 months)
• Citation is not...
Also…
• Get an ORCID iD
• Use the ORCID
search wizards to
auto-populate your
publications list
• On your publications
list...
EndNote & Lit Review Support
• Meet with your subject librarian to discuss
search strategies, receive assistance with
data...
LIBRARIANS ARE YOUR PARTNERS IN
FINDING, WRITING & PUBLISHING.
WE WORK WITH YOU, EMPOWERING YOUR
RESEARCH & IMPROVING YOUR...
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Trace and Your Publications: UT Knoxville

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Learn about the University of Tennessee's open repository, Trace, and what it means for your publications. Topics include compliance with public access policies, theses and dissertations, and green Open Access.

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Trace and Your Publications: UT Knoxville

  1. 1. What You Need to Know: Trace and Your Publications Rachel Radom Scholarly Communication & Publishing Librarian Spring 2016
  2. 2. Overview • What is Trace? • When would you use it? • What is Green Open Access? • Benefits of depositing work in Trace • Your Subject Librarian
  3. 3. What is Trace? • Online archive of institutional research • UT’s own open repository • Makes work findable • Makes work accessible • Trace: Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange http://trace.tennessee.edu
  4. 4. When should you use Trace? Whenever you want to share any of the following: • Electronic theses or dissertations • Peer-reviewed journal articles* • Data sets* • Presentations, white papers, etc. *Often required by funders with public access policies (compliance issue)
  5. 5. For Theses & Dissertations • Submit to Trace • If desired, request an embargo from the Graduate School • Why an embargo? • Chapter accepted as an article, not yet published • Creative work that will be sent out for consideration as a book
  6. 6. For Funder Policies • Most federal funders require public access to research resulting from grants they fund • Articles must be available in an open repository (sometimes a specific one) • Data sets must be available in an open repository (sometimes a specific one) • Private funders, too
  7. 7. For Green Open Access • Gold OA • Green OA / Delayed OA (12 month embargo) • Find OA Journals that Follow Best Practices: doaj.org
  8. 8. What else besides articles? • Presentations • White papers • Chapters • Artists’ Statements
  9. 9. Be Aware • You cannot make work public in Trace unless your publication agreement allows • Not sure? Check Sherpa/RoMEO • Sometimes subject to an embargo period (delayed OA, or green OA) • Deposit to Trace now, set embargo, no further action needed • You can negotiate your publication agreements to allow deposit to Trace
  10. 10. Benefits of Trace I • Items in Trace are indexed by Google Scholar, making your work both findable and accessible • More access = More views = More citations
  11. 11. Benefits of Trace II • Gives access to “potential users in business, charitable and public sectors, and to the general public” (RCUK Policy on Open Access) • Preservation in your institution’s library collection
  12. 12. Bigger Questions • Why don’t you own your own work? • Does a publisher need the copyright? No! • Can you retain your copyright? Yes! • Retain select rights via a publication agreement amendment • Offer a license to publish or a CC license • Some journals allow you to keep your ©
  13. 13. Notes to Researchers • Seek copyright permission for reuse of figures, tables, and the like (2-4 months) • Citation is not enough • Exceptions at UT: SAGE, Wiley-Blackwell (if figures were created by authors) • For graduate students, much easier to go route of article  chapter than chapter  article (journal’s “right of first publication”)
  14. 14. Also… • Get an ORCID iD • Use the ORCID search wizards to auto-populate your publications list • On your publications list, add links to articles in Trace
  15. 15. EndNote & Lit Review Support • Meet with your subject librarian to discuss search strategies, receive assistance with database searches, etc. • Literature Review Guide http://libguides.utk.edu/LitReviews • Endnote/Zotero Guide (with citation manager comparison chart) http://libguides.utk.edu/citeman/
  16. 16. LIBRARIANS ARE YOUR PARTNERS IN FINDING, WRITING & PUBLISHING. WE WORK WITH YOU, EMPOWERING YOUR RESEARCH & IMPROVING YOUR IMPACT. Your Subject Librarian >> http://s.lib.utk.edu/librarians Scholarly Communication & Publishing Librarian >> rradom@utk.edu

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