Practical Considerations for Implementing Prefabricated Data Centers

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Implementing prefabricated modular data centers results in well-understood benefits including speed of deployment, predictability, scalability, and lifecycle cost. The process of deploying them – from designing the data center, to preparing the site, to procuring the equipment, to installation – is quite different than that of a traditional data center. This presentation presents practical considerations, guidance, and results that a data center manager should expect from such a deployment.

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Practical Considerations for Implementing Prefabricated Data Centers

  1. 1. Practical Considerations for Implementing Prefabricated Data Centers Schneider Electric Data Center Science Center White Paper 166 Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  2. 2. Implementing prefabricated modular data centers results in well-understood benefits including speed of deployment, predictability, scalability, and lifecycle cost. The process of deploying them – from designing the data center, to preparing the site, to procuring the equipment, to installation – is quite different than that of a traditional data center. This paper presents practical considerations, guidance, and results that a data center manager should expect from such a deployment. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  3. 3. Introduction Understand practical considerations of deploying prefabricated modular data centers Considerations •• Project plan and design • Site prep • How equipment is procured • How equipment is installed and commissioned Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  4. 4. Prefab vs. Traditional Data Centers Deployment process Prefabricated data center deployment Traditional data center deployment • Engineering and specification performed at • Engineering and specification performed at Plan / Design system level • Less than 12 weeks for planning/design component level • Generally 24 (or more) weeks for planning/design • Value of UL Listed or other agency listed modules omitted from permitting costs • Permitting costs include value of all systems • documentation detailed Site preparation • Permitting documentation focus on interconnections of modules • Inspection of field-work only, not of subsystems within modules • Options placement Permitting requires drawings at subsystem level • Inspection of all field work, including traditional subsystem interconnections • Systems placed indoors except heat rejection of indoor or outdoor and • Modules generally placed directly over underground wiring/piping generator • Wiring/piping to building may require support hardware or special structures Procurement • Modules generally designed to meet transportation weight limits, arrive near fully assembled • Products arrive in different shipments, by different vendors • Construction trash is minimal • Construction trash is significant Installation • Climate and outdoor conditions / landscape impact placement / orientation when installed outdoors • Only outdoor cooling system and generator must consider outdoor conditions / landscape • Installed by forklifts and by hand, as separate • Typically installed by truck crane products Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  5. 5. Planning & Design Considerations Classification as “personal property” Prefab modules classified as “personal property” rather than “site” or “building improvements” • Modules booked and depreciated separate from building • May be leased independent of other site assets • May be moved from one regional data center to another while maintaining its prior depreciation and value Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  6. 6. Planning & Design Considerations System-level design engineering • Uses a system-level design approach rather than designing from parts • No need for architectural decisions •• Reduces time spent understanding requirements and developing design • All components and controls implemented and tested in factory as a complete system Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  7. 7. Site Preparation Considerations Site prep work is simplified • Permits obtained • Pipes and circuits laid • Land/building readied for system • Site inspection Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  8. 8. Site Preparation Considerations Permits and inspection • Reduced time to develop construction drawings and permit sets • More efficient review and inspection • Inspection focused on field-constructed aspects of prefab data centers only • Permitting costs don’t include value of facility module Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  9. 9. Site Preparation Considerations Locating modules indoors vs. outdoors • Weather-tight modules designed for outdoor use • Saves money – outdoor square footage less expensive • Must be near utilities, i.e., electricity, water, etc. • Consider ease of installation, servicing and general housekeeping • Modules installed indoors if: • module is skid-mounted • module enclosure is not weather rated • need/desire to protect personnel from inclement weather during operation and maintenance activities • require added security of critical systems Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  10. 10. Site Preparation Considerations Foundations for modules • Continuous concrete slab • most common • Multiple independent concrete slabs • frequently used where surface water drainage is an issue • Piers or concrete columns • module is skid-mounted Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  11. 11. Site Preparation Considerations Underground wire and piping interconnections • Data center module power less complex, less expensive if run underground • Requires fewer support structures • Can use less expensive materials • Power facility module can be dropped over pre-installed underground electrical conduits • Simplifies weather sealing and conductor terminations • Cooling modules located adjacent to emergence of underground chilled water piping • p Simplifies or eliminates need for pp support hardware or special structures Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  12. 12. Procurement Considerations Simpler, faster than traditional data center • Modules purchased from single vendor as single system or set of systems • Delivery challenges avoided • Transportation regulations taken into account by prefab integrators Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  13. 13. Procurement Considerations Transportation • Modules transported by truck • regulations governing weights and dimensions vary by state, country • ISO containers a common form factor • Module transport often contracted out • Protective measures taken prior to shipment •• examples –– doors secured, loose items tied down Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  14. 14. Procurement Considerations Packaging • Minimal packaging • reduces time and cost of packaging disposal • Exception -- UPS • batteries removed, packaged and restrained for safe transport Traditional Prefabricated Comparison of trash volume Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  15. 15. Procurement Considerations Protection from the elements • Modules not fully enclosed or weather tight must be sealed for transport • Common approaches • hard exterior • heavy duty shrink wrap • Packaged modules arrive in cleaner condition Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  16. 16. Site Installation Considerations Well-designed modules = faster, simpler installation • Module location • How to handle and place modules • How to secure modules Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  17. 17. Site Installation Considerations Positioning and orientation • Module placement outdoors significantly impacts • reliability • efficiency • accessibility • maintainability • Avoid • too much sun exposure • Stacked modules save space overhanging objects • high traffic areas • obstructions • poor drainage areas Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  18. 18. Site Installation Considerations Handling and placement • Container handlers • Overhead cranes • Mobile cranes • most economical choice for installation •• saves time and expense • To prevent damage • minimize contact between lifting straps and modules • level the load • use professional crane company Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  19. 19. Site Installation Considerations Securing modules and seismic considerations • Fix modules to location to withstand horizontal and vertical forces • example -- wind • Address seismic requirements where they exist • concrete foundation • foundation to module connection • Refer to seismic planning guides offered by data center manufacturers Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  20. 20. Conclusion ● Prefab modules simplify data center planning ● Compressed schedule from concept to completion ● Unique aspects of prefab vs. traditional ● planning ● site preparation ● packaging ● delivery ● handling ● placement ● securing module Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014
  21. 21. Resources Accounting and Tax Benefits of Modular, Portable Data Center Infrastructure White Paper 115 Data Center Projects: System Planning White Paper 142 Containerized Power and Cooling Modules for Data Centers White Paper 163 TCO Analysis of a Traditional Data Center vs. a Scalable, Containerized Data Center White Paper 164 Types of Prefabricated Modular Data Centers White p Paper 165 Browse all white papers whitepapers.apc.com Prefabricated vs. Traditional Data Center Cost Calculator TradeOff Tool 17 Data Center Design Planning Calculator TradeOff Tool 8 Browse all TradeOff Tools™ tools.apc.com Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 166 Presentation – July 2014

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