Cisco CCNA module 4

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Cisco CCNA module 4

  1. 1. 1© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Module 4 Cable Testing
  2. 2. 222© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Objectives
  3. 3. 333© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Sine Wave • A wave is energy traveling from one place to another. • The frequency is the number of waves each second, measured in Hertz. • One Hertz is equal to one wave per second, or one cycle per second.
  4. 4. 444© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Waves
  5. 5. 555© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Sine Waves and Square Waves Sine waves are periodic, which means that they repeat the same pattern at regular intervals
  6. 6. 666© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id • Square waves, like sine waves, are periodic. • The wave holds one value for some time, and then suddenly changes to a different value. Sine Waves and Square Waves
  7. 7. 777© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Exponents and Logarithms • Multiplication is a shortcut for addition. Recall that means 10 +10+ 10. It is 3 multiply by 10 • Exponents are a shortcut for multiplication. 10x10x10 can be written as 103 . therefore 1000 = 103 • AND Logarithm is a shortcut for exponents. Log of 103 means 3 100000000000000000 in logarithmic terms can be written as just 17 Why LOG? • Just to make big numbers look small • Important in internetworking and Electronics 1 billion =109 and log 109 = 9 1 billionth is Log 10-9 = -9 (equals 0.000000001) Try the interactive media 4.1.3
  8. 8. 888© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Decibels The decibel (dB) is a measurement unit important in describing networking signals.it measures the loss or gain of the power of a wave. Decibels are usually Negative numbers representing a loss in power as the wave travels, Positive values representing a gain in power if the signal is amplified
  9. 9. 999© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Analog and Digital Signals in Time and Frequency
  10. 10. 101010© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Noise in Time and Frequency
  11. 11. 111111© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Bandwidth
  12. 12. 121212© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Signaling over Copper and Fiber
  13. 13. 131313© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Signaling over Copper and Fiber
  14. 14. 141414© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Signaling over Copper and Fiber
  15. 15. 151515© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Signaling over Copper and Fiber
  16. 16. 161616© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Attenuation and Insertion Loss on Copper Media • Attenuation is the decrease in signal amplitude over the length of a link. • Attenuation is expressed in decibels (dB) using negative numbers. • Smaller negative dB values are an indication of better link performance.
  17. 17. 171717© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Sources of Noise on Copper Media
  18. 18. 181818© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Noise • Noise in communications refers to undesirable signals.undesirable signals. • Noise is any electrical energy on the transmission cable that makes it difficult for a receiver to interpret the data sent from the transmitter • Noise that affects all transmission frequencies equally is called white noise.white noise. • Noise that only affects small ranges of frequencies is called narrowbandnarrowband interferenceinterference Many possible sources of noise: –Nearby cables which carry data signals –Radio frequency interference (RFI), which is noise from other signals being transmitted nearby –Electromagnetic interference (EMI), which is noise from nearby sources such as motors and lights –Laser noise at the transmitter or receiver of an optical signal Make effort to minimise noise Interactive Media 4.1.7
  19. 19. 191919© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Crosstalk • Crosstalk involves the transmission of signals from one wire to a nearby wire. • When voltages change on a wire, electromagnetic energy is generated. • This energy radiates outward from the transmitting wire like a radio signal from a transmitter. • Adjacent wires in the cable act like antennas, receiving the transmitted energy, which interferes with data on those wires
  20. 20. 202020© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Sources of Noise on Copper Media • Twisted-pair cable is designed to take advantage of the effects of crosstalk in order to minimize noise • Higher categories of UTP require More TwistsMore Twists on each wire pair in the cable to minimize crosstalk at high transmission frequencies
  21. 21. 212121© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Types of Crosstalk Near-end crosstalk (NEXT)
  22. 22. 222222© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Types of Crosstalk Far-end crosstalk (FEXT)
  23. 23. 232323© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Types of Crosstalk Power sum near-end crosstalk (PSNEXT)
  24. 24. 242424© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Cable Testing Standards
  25. 25. 252525© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Cable Testing Standards
  26. 26. 262626© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Cable Testing Standards
  27. 27. 272727© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Crosstalk
  28. 28. 282828© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Analog and Digital Bandwidth • Analog Bandwidth could be used to describe the range of frequencies transmitted by a radio station or an electronic amplifier. • Units of measurement for analog bandwidth is Hertz, Example: Analog bandwidth value is 200 MHz for FM radio stations. • Digital bandwidth measures how much information can flow from one place to another in a given amount of time. • Unit of measurement for digital bandwidth is bits per second (bps).
  29. 29. 292929© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Time-based Parameters
  30. 30. 303030© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Testing Optical Fiber
  31. 31. 313131© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Testing Optical Fiber
  32. 32. 323232© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id New Standard • On June 20, 2002, the Category 6 (or Cat 6) addition to the TIA-568 standard was published. • This new standard specifies the original set of performance parameters that need to be tested for Ethernet cabling as well as the passing scores for each of these tests. • A quality cable tester is the Fluke DSP-LIA013 Channel/Traffic Adapter for Cat5e.
  33. 33. 333333© 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. www.pnj.ac.id Summary

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