William wordsworth, daffodils

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William wordsworth, daffodils

  1. 1.  William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworths magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which he revised and expanded a number of times. It was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as the poem "to Coleridge". Wordsworth was Britains Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850.
  2. 2.  William Wordsworth was born on 7 April 1770 in Wordsworth House in Cockermouth, Cumberland Wordsworths father, although rarely present, did teach him poetry, including that of Milton, Shakespeare and Spenser, in addition to allowing his son to rely on his own fathers library.
  3. 3. EDUCATION After the death of their mother, in 1778, John Wordsworth sent William to Hawkshead Grammar School in Lancashire and Dorothy to live with relatives in Yorkshire; Although Hawkshead was Wordsworths first serious experience with education, he had been taught to read by his mother and had attended a tiny school of low quality in Cockermouth. After the Cockermouth school, he was sent to a school in Penrith for the children of upper-class families and taught by Ann Birkett Wordsworth was taught both the Bible and the Spectator, but little else. It was at the school that Wordsworth was to meet the Hutchinsons, including Mary, who would be his future wife.
  4. 4.  Wordsworth made his debut as a writer in 1787 when he published a sonnet in The European Magazine. That same year he began attending St Johns College, Cambridge, and received his B.A. degree in 1791. He returned to Hawkshead for his first two summer holidays, and often spent later holidays on walking tours, visiting places famous for the beauty of their landscape. In 1790, he took a walking tour of Europe, during which he toured the Alps extensively, and visited nearby areas of France, Switzerland, and Italy.
  5. 5.  The Preface to Lyrical Ballads is considered a central work of Romantic literary theory. In it, Wordsworth discusses what he sees as the elements of a new type of poetry, one based on the "real language of men" and which avoids the poetic diction of much 18th-century poetry. Here, Wordsworth gives his famous definition of poetry as "the spontaneous overflow of powerful emotions recollected in tranquility: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility." A fourth and final edition of Lyrical Ballads was published in 1805.
  6. 6. In 1814 he published The Excursion as the second part of thethree-part The Recluse. He had not completed the first and thirdparts, and never would. He did, however, write a poetic Prospectusto "The Recluse" in which he lays out the structure and intent of thepoem. The Prospectus contains some of Wordsworths most famouslines on the relation between the human mind and nature: My voice proclaims How exquisitely the individual Mind (And the progressive powers perhaps no lessOf the whole species) to the external WorldIs fitted:--and how exquisitely, too,Theme this but little heard of among Men,The external World is fitted to the Mind.
  7. 7.  William Wordsworth died by re- aggravating a case of pleurisy on 23 April 1850, and was buried at St. Oswalds church in Grasmere. His widow Mary published his lengthy autobiographical "poem to Coleridge" as The Prelude several months after his death. Though this failed to arouse great interest in 1850, it has since come to be recognized as his masterpiece.
  8. 8. www.wikipedia.comwww.victorianweb.com/quotes/authors/w/william_wordsworth.html

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