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Storage Area Network (SAN session Day-1)

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Storage Area Network (SAN session Day-1)

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Storage Area Network (SAN session Day-1)

  1. 1. SAN Training – Day1
  2. 2. Agenda  Introduction to SAN  DAS  NAS  SAN  RAID Technologies  CIFS  NFS  ISCSI  FCP  FCIP  Snapshot 2
  3. 3. Why we will go for SAN?  In DAS HDDs are connected in a single path and bandwidth also shared.  SCSI cable length is max. 25 meter and can connect max. 16 disks  Maintenance down time is there  Application needs performance  Scalability  Difficult backup management  Inaccessible to data during maintenance 3
  4. 4. ` 4 I/O channel scsi I/O channel (Ethernet) I/O Channel (FC) Few devices connected Many Devices connected Many devices 16 Million Static (One to one) (can’t attaché another server Dynamic Plug and play Dynamic Low latency High latency Low latency Micro second Short distance 25 meter Longer distance Long distance 1000KM Hardware based delivery management (Block level) Software based delivery management (TCP/IP) Hardware based delivery management (Block level) Why we will go for SAN?
  5. 5. Storage Area Network
  6. 6. What is Storage Area Network? Storage Area Network (SAN) is a specialized, high speed, high availability network that uses fiber channel technology to connect servers to storage disks. 6
  7. 7. Common SAN Definitions  Node -Any device connected to the SAN (servers, Tap drives, Tape library, VMware server, Unix server etc.…)  WWN (world wide Name)-Unique identifiers used to identify storage devices  Fabric-Encompasses all hardware that connects servers and workstations to storage devices through the use of fiber channel switching technology  Fiber Channel-High speed network technology used mainly for the storage area 7
  8. 8. Design Considerations  Should solve an underlying business need.  Meet business requirements for availability and reliability  Be scalable to meet current and future business needs  Be cost-effective and easy of manageability 8
  9. 9. Benefits of a SAN  Eliminates restrictions on the amount of data that can be accessed by an individual server as oppose to server with direct attached disk.  Storage can be accessed by multiple serves simultaneously with faster processing.  Storage resources can be centrally managed and storage space can be allocated and deallocated to hosts as needed.  Components are hot-swappable, eliminating downtime 9
  10. 10. Three Basic Forms of Network Storage  Direct access storage (DAS)  Network attached storage (NAS)  Storage area network (SAN) 10
  11. 11. What is Direct Attached Storage (DAS)? Direct Attached Storage (DAS), the name is pretty self-explanatory. A disk subsystem that is directly connected to a host rather than going through a switched network, thereby giving the host exclusive access to the disks. 11
  12. 12. Network Attached Storage (NAS)  Specialized storage device or group of storage devices providing centralized fault- tolerant data storage for a network 12
  13. 13. SAN 13
  14. 14. Fabric
  15. 15. Quick Overview 15
  16. 16. RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)  A group of hard disks is called a disk array  RAID combines a disk array into a single virtual device called RAID drive  Provide fault tolerance for shared data and applications  Different implementations: Level 0-5  Characteristics: – Storage Capacity – Speed: Fast Read and/or Fast Write (Performance) – Resilience in the face of device failure (Fault tolerance) 16
  17. 17. RAID LEVELS RAID 0 – striping (Min-2 and Max-16) RAID 1 – mirroring (Min-2 and Max-2) RAID 5 – striping with parity(Min-3, max-16) RAID 6 – striping with double parity (Min-4, Max-16) RAID 10 – combining mirroring and striping (Min-2, Max-16) RAID DP & 4 - This is only for NetApp
  18. 18. RAID level 0 – Striping In a RAID 0 system data are split up in blocks that get written across all the drives in the array. By using multiple disks (at least 2) at the same time, this offers superior I/O performance
  19. 19. RAID level 1 – Mirroring Data are stored twice by writing them to both the data drive (or set of data drives) and a mirror drive (or set of drives) . If a drive fails, the controller uses either the data drive or the mirror drive for data recovery and continues operation. You need at least 2 drives for a RAID 1 array.
  20. 20. RAID level 5 RAID 5 is the most common secure RAID level. It requires at least 3 drives but can work with up to 16. Data blocks are striped across the drives and on one drive a parity checksum of all the block data is written. The parity data are not written to a fixed drive, they are spread across all drives, as the drawing below shows. Using the parity data, the computer can recalculate the data of one of the other data blocks, should those data no longer be available. That means a RAID 5 array can withstand a single drive failure without losing data or access to data. Although RAID 5 can be achieved in software, a hardware controller is recommended. Often extra cache memory is used on these controllers to improve the write performance.
  21. 21. RAID level 10 – combining RAID 1 & RAID 0 It is possible to combine the advantages (and disadvantages) of RAID 0 and RAID 1 in one single system. This is a nested or hybrid RAID configuration. It provides security by mirroring all data on secondary drives while using striping across each set of drives to speed up data transfers. For more random access we can go for this raid and EMC called this raid as fastest raid. Mirroring + Striping (Gives highest performance as there is no calculation happening)
  22. 22. RAID-4 and RAID-DP RAID4-To implement Raid-4 minimum 3 disks required and It can sustain one disk failure. It is a horizontal row parity approach. Raid-DP-To implement Raid-DP minimum 4 disks required and it can sustain 2 disks failure. It is a diagonal parity stripe
  23. 23. CIFS
  24. 24. CIFS (Common Internet File system)  CIFS, a protocol that defines a standard for remote file access using millions of computers at a time. With CIFS, users with different platforms and computers can share files without having to install new software.  CIFS runs over TCP/IP but uses the SMB (Server Message Block)protocol found in Microsoft Windows for file and printer access.
  25. 25. Configure and access the CIFS share  Configure the CIFS and start SMB protocol in NetApp storage  Create CIFS share  Access and create CIFS share from windows client  Map a network drive for windows client  Edit permission for CIFS share
  26. 26. Configure CIFS share
  27. 27. Configure CIFS share
  28. 28. Configure CIFS share
  29. 29. NFS
  30. 30. NFS file system NFS is Unix file system developed by the Sun-microsystem through which we can access the share drive or volume from the storage to Unix machines. Configure and access NFS Objectives-: Understand Unix file system Configure the NFS exports in NetApp stooge Mount NFS exports to a Unix/Linux client machine Create and delete the files from the client machine
  31. 31. NFS
  32. 32. NFS
  33. 33. NFS
  34. 34. NFS
  35. 35. NFS
  36. 36. NFS
  37. 37. iSCSI (internet scsi)
  38. 38. Hardware iscsi (Iscsi hba) TOE + ISCSI Headers -TCP offload engine –it is processing the TCP/IP header Data going as block through the network called SAN
  39. 39. Fiber Channel Protocol FC (Fibre Channel) is just the underlying transport layer that SANs use to transmit data. This is the language used by the HBAs, hubs, switches and storage controllers in a SAN to talk to each other. The Fibre Channel protocol is a low-level language meaning that it's just used as a language between the actual hardware, not the applications running on it.
  40. 40. Fiber Channel Protocol
  41. 41. FCOE (FC Over Ethernet)
  42. 42. FCIP(Fiber channel over IP)
  43. 43. NETAPP SNAPSHOT TECHNOLOGY How does NetApp snapshot technology works? When data ontap creates a snapshot copy, it preserves the inode map as it is at the point in time and then continuous to make changes to the inode map on the active file system. Data ontap keeps the older version of the inode map. There is no data movement at the point in time of the snapshot copy is created.
  44. 44. NETAPP SNAPSHOT TECHNOLOGY
  45. 45. NETAPP SNAPSHOT TECHNOLOGY
  46. 46. NETAPP SNAPSHOT TECHNOLOGY
  47. 47. NETAPP SNAPSHOT TECHNOLOGY
  48. 48. NETAPP SNAPSHOT TECHNOLOGY SNAPSHOT COPIES :- We can create 255 snapshots per volume Point in time copy Created in a few seconds No performance penalty
  49. 49. Snapshot in other SANs
  50. 50. Snapshot in other SANs
  51. 51. Snapshot in other SANs
  52. 52. Thanks!

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