Developing a technology enhanced learning strategy

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This presentation was presented jointly with Sarah Davies at University of East London on the 15th January 2014 as part of the Changing Learning Landscapes programme of support.

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  • Key introductory slide to introduce how we will be approaching the presentation part of the session. Based on current Jisc work, we have identified the themes of digital literacies, curriculum design, assessment and feedback and working in partnership with students as being key drivers for the successful implementation of TEL. This is in the context of an institution having developed a TEL strategy alongside other key strategy documents eg Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy, Information Technology strategy,
  • A specified change is embedded when the new practices that you are seeking to introduce are accepted and demonstrated by a majority of those who need to do so. To embed a new practice in your organisation you need to enable a change in the component of the culture that impacts upon the new behaviour required of individuals.
    Culture is simply defined as ‘the way things are done around here’
  • Formulate a clear strategic vision: In order to make a cultural change effective a clear vision of the university’s new strategy, shared values and behaviours related to that specific change is needed. This vision provides the intention and direction for the culture change.
    Display top-management commitment: Culture change must be managed from the top of the organisation, as willingness to change of the senior management is an important indicator. The top of the organisation should be seen and heard to be very much in favour of the change in order to actually implement the change in the rest of the organization.
    Model culture change at the highest level: The behaviour of the senior management needs to symbolize the kinds of values and behaviours that should be realised in the rest of the institution. It is important that the management shows the strengths of the current culture – ‘celebrating what we do well’. In most cases, to reduce anxiety, and therefore resistance, it must be made clear that the current organisational does not need radical changes, but just a few adjustments
    Modify the organisation to support organizational change: This means addressing what gets in the way of the change required. This includes identifying what current systems, policies, procedures and rules need to be changed in order to align with the new values and desired culture. This may include a change to accountability systems, compensation, benefits and reward structures, and recruitment and retention programs to better align with the new values and to send a clear message to employees that the old system and culture are in the past.
    Highlight the benefits of the new practices: The institution’s leaders and managers should be able to articulate the connections between the desired behaviour (the adoption of new practices) and how it will impact and improve the organisation’s success, to further encourage buy-in in the change process. Training should be provided to all affected and should ensure full understanding of the new practices and the reason for their adoption, and all communication should support this.
    Ensure there is a connection between the interests of the institution and of those affected. Changes in practice can be seen to be counter to cultural norms and thus can lead to tensions between organisational and individual interests, which can result in ethical concerns for those practitioners involved.
  • Setting the scene – the TEL strategy has to be considered in light of other core institutional strategies – how can TEL support the core business of UEL? How does the strategy link to other strategies as listed here – what is the relationship in terms of governance and in terms of key strategic priorities?
    “There is always a better strategy than the one you have, you just haven’t thought of it yet”Sir Brian Pitman
    (Widely regarded as most successful banker of his generation – chief exec and then chairman of Lloyds Bank for 18 years up to 2001)
    Importance of linking TEL Strategy to other institutional strategies – Learning, Teaching and Assessment; IT strategy, Estates, Library, HR, Course information….
    Today we will be focusing on the 4 themes we have outlined – all of which are interlinked and form the cornerstones for successfully implementing TEL across the curriculum. But other key areas for discussion when developing the TEL strategy include the awareness of current institutional systems and technologies vs the debate of bring your own devices – what is UELs current thinking on this topic? (Reflection point?)
    How is UEL developing its response to MOOCs?
    Does UEL have a position on open – in relation to learning and teaching – as well as the wider issues relating to other aspects of the core business
    Does UEL have a robust strategy for managing course information and related data?
    All of which link to and underpin the successful implementation of TEL
  • Checking and Maintaining Progress
    To ensure that practices are embedded the following are important:
    Evaluation:
    This can be conducted periodically to monitor the change progress and identify areas that need further development. This step will also identify obstacles of change and resistant employees and to highlight successful adoption of new practices.
     
    Constant Communication
    Use all possible means to convey the messages that you want the individuals that need to adopt new practices see and hear.
     
    Celebration:
    Find good new practice and publicly reward individuals and teams. Acknowledging and rewarding improvement and engagement will also encourage continued change and evolvement.
     
    Change managers:
    Consider nominating change managers or equivalent to refresh the process.
  • See accompanying handout for details.
  • Charting the development of technology-enhanced learning developments across the UK higher education sector: a longitudinal perspective (2001–2012)
    Richard Walker, Julie Voce & Martin Jenkins
    Dec 2013
    A few relevant quotes from a recently published report which has reviewed TEL developments across the UK over the past 11 years (2001 – 2012) which have drawn on the UCISA – Jisc annual TEL surveys.
  • Findings from the DL synthesis report which also apply to successfully taking forward TEL
    From reviewing the outcomes of the Jisc Developing Digital Literacies programme, a variety of organisational strategies for supporting TEL were evident: 
    Support and amplify the impact of communities of practice, either role-based (e.g. teaching administrators, e-learning staff) or interest-based (e.g. assessment SIG, iPad users)
    Develop the roles of professional staff (e.g. careers advisers, learning developers, librarians, e-learning staff) to explicitly encompass support for the digital literacies of others
    Recruit and work with students as agents of change (as co-researchers, student representatives, developers, departmental champions, peer coaches and mentors, etc)
    Fund mini-projects in departments and professional services – local champions identify needs and negotiate solutions
    Embed digital literacies into the curriculum by mapping graduate attributes and providing curriculum teams with relevant guidance, examples, workshop opportunities
    Focus on raising student awareness of and confidence in digital academic practices at key stages: pre-induction, induction, first assessment, transition
    Bring Your Own Device/Service strategy e.g. provide robust wifi, a variety of appropriate learning/socialising spaces, secure storage, help desks and workshops focused on own devices/services
  • Developing an institutional strategy for student engagement (support from NUS resources)
    Understanding students expectations and experiences of technology – Jisc Digital Student project
    Institutional approaches to engaging students as partners in curriculum design, developing digital literacies and assessment and feedback
  • Using the four-stage picture of engagement as a reflective tool, this exercise challenges students’ representatives and institution managers and academics to evaluate their current
    student engagement practices. The focus of this task is to think about the outcomes of engagement activities and the impact that policies and practices have on students.
  • Jisc Digital Student study explored students expectations and experiences of technology use in higher education.
    Literature review: overview of background work from Jisc, HEA, British Library etc. Around 20 studies reviewed. Analysed in depth:
    3 national studies
    12 institutional studies
    Student focus group (x13)
    Interviews with institutional practitioners (x12)
    Interviews with stakeholders (NUS, SCONUL, RLUK, RUGIT, UCISA, Jisc)
    Join the conversation http://digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org
  • Manage student expectations
    Equip students to learn effectively with digital technology
    Support students and staff to use their own devices (BYOD)
    Ensure digital content is device neutral where appropriate
    Enhance the curriculum with digital activities and experiences
    Engage students in projects to enhance their digital experience
    Develop and reward innovators – models of accreditation – look at learning from dig Lit and Change Agents Network – Institutional Change Leader award with SEDA
    Encourage a culture of continuous organisational research
    Consider digital experiences alongside other aspects of the student experience – importance of joining up with other support services IT Libraries Estates etc
  • http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com/w/page/31087422/Students%20as%20Change%20Agents
    Innovating in the curriculum through the use of technology is a perennial problem but a number of projects have developed programmes which actively engage students as partners in the change process. Evidence from a number of initiatives across a number of Jisc programmes shows that involving students more centrally in the change agenda can be highly effective. Here are some examples of institutional approaches to engaging students as partners, champions and collaborators in the use of technology to support learning and teaching:
    Oxford Brookes InStePP project - Student partnerships offer a way to join up provision for digital literacies for staff and students across the institution by establishing, supporting and building recognition for the role of student ‘ePioneers’ within existing core academic and e-learning development activities.
    Resources:
    3-way partnership agreement model
    Development wheel
    Recruitment documentation
    ePioneer Role descriptors
    Endorsed professional body (ILM) scheme: FutureConsultants course outline
  • Oxford Brookes InStePP project - Student partnerships offer a way to join up provision for digital literacies for staff and students across the institution by establishing, supporting and building recognition for the role of student ‘ePioneers’ within existing core academic and e-learning development activities.
    Resources:
    3-way partnership agreement model
    Development wheel
    Recruitment documentation
    ePioneer Role descriptors
    Endorsed professional body (ILM) scheme: FutureConsultants course outline
  • Greenwich Digital Literacies in Transition project - cross-university studentships foster a community of student-led research to support and feed into all other aspects of the project. Termed the IRG (Interdisciplinary Research Group), this group of students, their mentors and members of staff from all aspects of the institution will engage in baselining activities as well as develop digital literacy OERs.
    Resources available: 
    Student journey questionnaire
    Student journey badges
    Resources relating to the Interdisciplinary Research Group e.g. recruitment process
  • University of Reading Digitally Ready project has worked with students as partners in digital projects with academics, students as researchers, students feeding in their stories to inform work on the project and students undertaking work directly for the project
    Student Fellows at Bath Spa and Winchester - The FASTECH project is focused on enhancing feedback and assessment processes through the use of technology.  The project has recruited Student Fellows to participate in research activities, generate ideas, develop case studies, write blogs and attend and present at conferences. They are the interface between the project team and students and lecturers.  Further guidance on the student fellows scheme is available here
    16 student fellows trained and working as change agents across 14 degree programmes
    Staff trained to use and embed new technologies for A&F in their courses
    Student fellowships embedded and rolling out institutionally in 13/14
    A&F Toolkit - assets built collaboratively by staff and students
    Student fellows have assisted with FASTECH in nearly all aspects of the project. They receive a bursary, training and support from project developers, and are seen as work as members of their programme team. Our fellows were involved in the creation of A&F enhancement pilots and helped gather and evaluate data.
  • Birmingham City University – Student Academic Partners
    The T-SPARC project engaged with students through the University’s Student Academic Partners (SAP) programme as part of a review of curriculum design practices and processes.  SAP aims to integrate students into the teaching and pedagogic research community within BCU in order to develop collaboration between students and staff.  The T-SPARC project also produced a wider stakeholder engagement model which could be used when considering the development of student engagement activities.
    Their work won the 2013 HEA and NUS Students’ Union and Institution Partnership Award;
    Inspirational Leadership Seminar Series: Students as Partners
    When: 11 February, 14:00-15:00 webinar
  • Students have been given opportunities to work in partnership with university staff in order to address the challenges of using technology with large and diverse cohorts.
    They have undertaken research on student views and perceptions, provided recommendations and solutions for practice, and have supported staff in bringing about wide-scale changes in teaching.
    Much of this work evolved through the Integrate project . Resources are available on the project website.   The work continues through projects such as the Cascade Digital Literacies project which involves postgraduate researchers. 
    Podcast : Students as Agents of Change at Exeter
  • Available from Change Agent Network www.changeagentsnetwork.co.uk
    #CAN2014
  • Join the Jisc supported Change Agents Network – www.hei-flyers.org
    Event for staff and students at University of Winchester on 18-19th February
    This event has been designed to run over two days, bringing people together to support staff and students working as agents of change. People from across the country, facilitated by experts, will engage in areas of educational technology, assessment, staff development and change. The event will be lively, including hands-on activities, presentations, workshops and discussion – attendees will be given a certificate of completion. The event, on the 18th & 19th of February, has the following objectives:
    Meet with peers and experts;
    Accelerate project development by engaging with people doing similar work;
    Attend specific workshops on: assessment (TESTA focused), technology – (Mobile focused) staff development (Viewpoints focused) and sustainability (curriculum focused);
    Enhance publishing and writing skills through engagement in a publishing workshop;
    Foster career development by learning about change agent accreditation;
    Find solutions to problems and identify sources of support.
    Institutional Change Leader - national award (accredited by SEDA) for staff and students working as change agents.
    Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership & Change
  • The process of curriculum design combines educational design with many other areas including: information management, market research, marketing, quality enhancement, quality assurance and programme and course approval. The curriculum must evolve to meet the changing needs of students and employers. It must change to reflect new needs, new audiences and new approaches to learning. We have identified eight stages in the curriculum design cycle from engaging stakeholders to ensuring the curriculum continues to be reviewed and enhanced in response to feedback and changing circumstances.
    Through the Jisc Institutional Approaches to curriculum design programme, we funded 12 projects to explore how technology could enhance and support institutional practices and processes relating to curriculum design.
  • Considered use of technology as part of the curriculum design process can help you to:
    develop new solutions to address organisational, technical and educational issues
    communicate in new ways with stakeholders including employers and professional bodies to facilitate discussion and collaboration
    access, record and capture information to inform your curriculum design
    improve access to guidance for those designing and describing curricula
  • Considered use of technology as part of the curriculum design process can help you to:
    model, test and refine new approaches in curriculum design
    improve communication flows both internally and externally
    provide ‘single-truth’ sources of information that are accurate and can be interrogated and analysed to suit multiple purposes
    develop effective and agile validation processes that are more responsive to employer and community needs
    increase consistency both in terms of the learner experience and quality assurance
    develop more efficient administrative processes
    ‘The potential gain of technology-enabled systems is not just one of increased efficiency. A clear finding from those who have invested in them is that improved approval and review processes aid rather than inhibit good educational design.’
  • The process of curriculum design combines educational design with many other areas including: information management, market research, marketing, quality enhancement, quality assurance and programme and course approval. The curriculum must evolve to meet the changing needs of students and employers. It must change to reflect new needs, new audiences and new approaches to learning. We have identified eight stages in the curriculum design cycle from engaging stakeholders to ensuring the curriculum continues to be reviewed and enhanced in response to feedback and changing circumstances.
    Through the Jisc Institutional Approaches to curriculum design programme, we funded 12 projects to explore how technology could enhance and support institutional practices and processes relating to curriculum design.
  • Manchester Metropolitan University aimed to develop curricula that were more responsive to the needs of students and employers. They developed streamlined documentation and transparent approval and review processes including an innovative board game based on curriculum design and approval processes. Faculty-based approval processes were replaced by a centralised light-touch review and approval system ensuring a more consistent student experience across all units of learning. This work ran alongside another strategic initiative, that of re-engineering the entire undergraduate curriculum to provide a sharper focus on formative assessment.
    The Supporting Responsive Curricula (SRC) project was a four-year programme which ended in July 2012. Its purpose was to try to make the institution more responsive to the needs of various stakeholders, notably students, employers and professional bodies. The original aim of the project was to experiment with curriculum changes in four subject areas, Law, Accounting and Finance, Physiotherapy and Creative Digital with initiatives which involved seeking more input from professional bodies and employers to the curriculum but also looking at ways in which students could showcase their capabilities using some form of PDP/e-portfolio. Alongside this subject specific work, the whole curriculum development process was examined with the aim of streamlining the quality assurance process, placing the curriculum in an online database and linking course units more closely to employability measures.
    The JISC programme provided an opportunity to baseline the institutional curriculum design process, collecting the strengths and weaknesses of the process in a single document and prioritising the opportunities for improvement. After reviewing the outputs of this base lining together with a need to improve NSS scores and employability outcomes, the institution embarked on a major change programme known as EQAL (Enhancing Quality and Assessment for Learning). EQAL involved a re-write of the entire undergraduate curriculum, linking learning outcomes to employability outcomes, revising the programme approval process, developing an online curriculum database and introducing many new systems for students including a new VLE, personalised timetabling and online assessment submission.
    The work of SRC and the complete institutional change invoked through EQAL, have made important sector contributions that other institutions can benefit from: These include:
    Experiences of managing stakeholder engagement through a whole institution change process.
    A number of strategies and tools for managing curriculum change and programme approval.
    Some specific examples of engaging with employers and professional bodies and using their input to influence the curriculum.
    Requirements and issues that arise in transforming a paper-based curriculum definition into an online database that is visible to both staff and students.
    An innovative and wide-ranging evaluation strategy that provides a rich menu of options to be used in evaluating change at this level.
    This has been achieved through:
    New ways of delivering learning and academic provision that satisfy the expectations of students and staff much more efficiently and effectively, significantly reducing current effort and frustration;
    A sharper focus on employability by embedding an Employability Curriculum Framework (ECF) within the whole curriculum, with all course units mapping learning outcomes and assessments to graduate outcomes. This is to put employability at the heart of the whole curriculum, not just for programmes that have strong vocational aims;
    Transforming the complex and burdensome nature of current course structures and processes towards simplicity with high quality;
    A consequent reduction of workload for both staff and students in order to free time for more productive activity.
  • Birmingham City University has developed a radically new approach to approval that facilitates the integration of authentic, real-world practices into formal approval processes. One-off, paper-based validation events are replaced by a continuous process of curriculum development and enhancement captured via digital media and supported through Microsoft® SharePoint®. A rough guide to curriculum design takes course teams through the innovative approach and digital recording issues are addressed within the institut
    ional data protection policy.
    The Technology Supported Processes for Agile and Responsive Curricula (T-SPARC) project at Birmingham City University has sought to transform the institutional culture and practice of curriculum design and approval. Our intention has been to move from a position where curriculum design as a process is undertaken primarily as a prelude to an end-point approval event to one that embraces iterative collaborative design from which approval cascades. Furthermore, we have sought to develop technology that supports this approach within an online environment and to enrich the design process by making technology-based tools available to programme teams so as to broaden their opportunity to engage meaningfully with a wider range of stakeholders than do our extant processes.
    In summary, we have created and deployed both policy and systems that allow for successful iterative collaborative design and ‘emergent approval’. However, our pilot technology offered a steep, and at times frustrating, learning curve for our (pilot) users. This has contributed to (though by no means fully) some cultural inertia in relation to full embracement of the potential of the new process and system by our pilot users.
    1. A new process for curriculum design and approval, including ratification from the University’s Senate to conduct live pilots
    2. A new SharePoint-based infrastructure to support the new processes of curriculum design and programme approval
    3. Completed pilots, nine programmes across four faculties, that have used the process and system mentioned above
    4. A new extensive guide to the process of curriculum design that supports programme teams in their work
  • Cardiff University worked on several fronts to ensure more effective communication of course information.
    They developed web services to enable academic schools to manage the publication of module data; they also restructured the information held in the student information system by developing templates for module and programme descriptions.
    These developments have transformed the ability of staff and students to access programme information and improved the likelihood of providing consistent and accurate information.
    "The headline achievement of the PALET project can be described in straightforward terms: It is to have created a new, holistic context for how Cardiff University approaches the design, management and communication of its educational provision in the future.“
    In terms of the design of its educational provision,
    The project ensured that Curriculum Design was identified as a key priority in the University’s new Education Strategy, which enabled the project to work directly with the Education and Quality Teams to achieve benefits for students and staff in line with the University’s vision for this area.
    The project worked with the 'Student Voice' initiative at Cardiff University, to seek to ensure that students are provided with opportunities to be involved in curriculum design processes and activities.
    The project developed and delivered a programme of face-to-face workshops to explore new ways of supporting curriculum design in the University. As part of the workshop series participants were encouraged to facilitate student participation in the design of curriculum, either through focus groups or Student-Staff panels.
    In terms of the management of its educational provision,
    The project utilised the Lean Thinking methodology for process improvements to develop revised, technology supported procedures for the approval and management of curriculum developments at the University.
    The project developed a set of key principles to inform the development of a more holistic approach to programme management, endorsed by the University’s Academic Standards and Quality Committee (ASQC) in 2010, based on establishing a single source of programme and module information.
    The project fully tested, piloted and implemented a revised, technology supported process to enable Schools to manage their modules in SITS.
    The PALET team developed streamlined Programme Approval and Management Processes using SITS process manager, to support staff in Schools to develop, approve and manage new and existing programmes.
    In terms of the communication of its educational provision,
    The project worked with colleagues from the Registry and in Academic Schools to develop new templates to enable a more streamlined and consistent approach to the management of programme and module information.
    The project has implemented SITS as the ‘source of truth’ for programme and module data, to be used for every aspect of communication about programmes.
    The project has developed web services to enable schools and University Directorates to simply manage the publication of module data held in SITS on the web.
    PALET has also developed a ‘Programme Management Portlet’ to enable schools to simply view, download and print the programme information held in the SITS system.
  • Curriculum design is an inherently collaborative activity. Learning design tools enable curriculum designers to model a new or revised curriculum proposal, then share and discuss the outcomes with stakeholders.
    The Open University developed a tool providing a compendium of approaches in learning design and built into the design the ability to collaborate on design activities at a distance. In addition, they have developed a set of course mapping and profiling templates and activities to help designers visualise the consequences of design decisions on pedagogy, cost and the student experience.
    The aim of the OULDI-JISC project was to implement, evaluate and revise a range of learning design tools, approaches and resources that had been developed for the enhancement of formal and informal curriculum design practice. Due to the scale, duration and impact of the project, it represents an important contribution to what has been a four year period of significant change in how ‘design’ is theorised, understood and practised in the HE sector. The project consisted of five interlinked strands of work focused on developing:
    processes and workshops to support design
    new representations of curriculum designs
    online social space for sharing learning design experiences
    software for visualising student learning experience/teachers designs
    environments to promote communities of practice
    At the Open University the project has sought to engage at both the strategic and cross-faculty level and in-situ through four unit or faculty pilots. Yet it has also reached beyond the university, delivering pilots at four other UK universities, building an online global community of educational practitioners and disseminating materials and research.
    Over a journey of almost four years, the project has explored, learnt and evolved. The project began in September 2008 by aligning itself to external questions, such as how best to achieve pedagogic benefits from new technologies, and to internal questions - such as how to implement leaning and curriculum design in an institutional setting. Almost four years later, the original core interests in understanding, visualising, guiding and sharing design remain, yet there has also been a gradual evolution in what how each of these is interpreted, what the key questions are, and what the associated tools and approaches should look like.
    ide for reflective, hands-on activities can make a significant difference to the forward thinking of curriculum teams.
    Demonstrated that it is possible to achieve success in changing or improving the process, practice and perception of curriculum design yet this requires a combination of elements working together: selection of effective design tools; well configured institutional and informal design processes; proper opportunity for collaboration; reflexive working and dedicated time away from the day-to-day to work on a design; positive and real management endorsement; staff with positive attitudes and adequate tacit knowledges of the art of teaching and the discipline of designing learning; and an expert consultant role to guide and advise teams. The success of embedding learning design is therefore dependent both on the internal quality of the particular design approach or tool and on the capability of the (institutional/professional skills) context to ‘receive’ it.
    Created an online tool called Cloudworks which enables those working in learning and curriculum design to: view, add and comment on ideas/ work/ experiences of learning design (each object added is termed a ‘cloud’), to organise these online clouds in to groups (‘cloudscapes’) and to build personal public profiles of contributions. Between the tool launch in March 2009 and December 2011 there were 1.03 million page views, over 230,000 visits, 4,500 clouds added, and 5,500 comments posted. Cloudworks now has a strong brand image boasting over 4,600 registered users from across the world and use by several learning design related conferences and communities of practice.
    Delivered nine pilots across six UK HE institutions. Each pilot has sought to present and embed learning design tools and approaches. In total over 270 staff have attended our workshops. These pilots have demonstrated how different contexts can impact on use and has shown that tools and approaches may often need to be partially re-versioned in order to become sufficiently relevant to a particular university process and culture. These pilots have required specific expertise in the practical and academic discipline of learning design, especially where there are a range of current design approaches used by individuals.
    Customised OU-originated visualisation software to make it more usable in a learning design context. This software has been named CompendiumLD. The project team also used this opportunity to explore how learning design can be represented, the benefits of doing so, and barriers to the use of visualisation technologies. Many benefits have been identified – for example, one user noted ‘all in all, I think this way to represent does have advantages with respect to more verbal approaches: it perhaps takes more time to learn to use it, but the final result is more ‘readable’". CompendiumLD is open source, has been downloaded over 2,000 times and has been included in at least two university courses.
    Fully engaged in disseminating the practical and research aspects of the project. The project team has: directly contributed to over twenty conference papers, several journal papers and a book chapter; delivered over forty presentations to external audiences; maintained a regular blog; and made resources, reports, tools and guides available on its website and the JISC Design Studio.
  • Jisc, a UK body supporting the use of digital technologies in UK higher education, further education and skills, is funding a this work involving over 20 UK higher education institutions.
    There are 3 strands focusing on institutional change, evaluation of technologies in use and development technology transfer.  Overall there is a strong emphasis the educational rationale for enhancing learning and teaching through technology and delivering efficiencies and quality improvements.  
  • across the sector.  Whilst there are excellent examples of effective support for learning and the use of technology to support these, there is still a considerable problem with resistance to change and the scaling up of good practice and innovation.
    If we take  strategy and policy,  there is an apparent mismatch between what is enshrined in assessment strategies and the reality of what is happening on the ground.  These strategy documents tend to be quite procedural in focus and don’t reflect current thinking around effective assessment practice and the value that assessment can bring to learning.
    Another key issue is that devolved responsibility for assessment and feedback across faculties and service departments results in considerable inconsistencies, making it difficult to achieve parity of experience for learners.  
    In terms of infrastructure there has been considerable investment in enterprise solutions to support assessment and feedback but all too often the implementation of the  technology has been seen as the solution with inadequate support for ongoing staff training and engagement.  Institutional processes are also not always fit for purpose and the lack of interoperability between systems is a persistant problem.
    When it comes to assessment and feedback practice the issues are varied and complex but include the persistance of traditional forms of summative assessment such as essays/exams which increase the workload burden.  Providing feedback is also an issue esp as deadlines are often tight and there is pressure on teaching staff to turn around feedback in tight timescales.  Timeliness, along with quality and consistency of feedback was an issue almost across the board, for example even where clear deadlines were set it wasn’t always in time to feed into next assignment. Curriculum design could also provide barriers to the ongoing developmental approach to feedback.
    Engaging learners can often be problematic as the value of acting on feedback is not always well-communicated, and was notable absent in most induction processes. This goes back to the emphasis on high-stakes assessment and the value that is placed on marks and grades.  Engaging with employers is causing many  institutions to rethink approaches to assessment practice which often do reflect the reality of the professional world. Engaging administrators has also emerged as key, although they can be often left out of the dialogue.
  • The technology landscape shows a wide array of technologies used to support assessment and feedback in a variety of ways, ranging from enterprise solutions to support formal processes to digital tools for teaching and learning.  Most universities have this variety of technologies at their disposal but there is considerable variety in the extent to which the technologies are integrated or supported.
    On the whole universities are tending to work with technologies that are already well-established and will have a core group of technologies which they support but policies to support the use of external tools esp social media is variable and practice in the use of these is patchy.  
  • This is just a snapshot of the sort of issues that are looking to be addressed within the Jisc assessment and feedback programme, and I’ll just touch on a few of these and provide some examples of how these are being tackled.
    Assessment and feedback practice (focus on learning processes)
    Engaging learners with feedback
    Employability
    Assessment management (institutional processes)
    Change management (
    Also have projects working on assessment bunching, engaging learners in large cohorts,
  • The value of learners engaging with their feedback and the impact this has on improving performance has been strongly referenced in the academic literature.   However, there is a perception that students don’t engage with feedback. There are various reasons why this might be but one factor which is born out by the National Student Survey is the timeliness and consistency/quality of feedback.  Automation of the process could help alleviate the problem for example through audio feedback which research shows can be beneficial in terms of time-savings and student engagement.
    Another way around the problem is to create regular opportunities for learners to engage in discussion around their feedback, and to think more about ‘feedforward’ in terms of how this feedback can lead to improvements in future assignments. I’ll just mention two projects how have explored this approach.
    The University of Dundee school of medicine deliver a purely online distance learning masters in medical education. So the tutors are delivering feedback, but weren’t clear the students were reading, understanding and acting on feedback.
    They have redesigned the feedback process by adding a cover sheet to all assignments asking students to assess how well they feel they have delivered the learning outcomes, writing style, referencing, and what aspect they would like feedback on, and how they have acted on previous feedback.
    Tutors mark the cover sheet and add comments. Students are then asked to reflect on their feedback in a wiki, and answer how well does the tutor feedback match the self evaluation, what have you learnt, what response will you make, and whether anything was unclear. Tutor continues the dialogue through the wiki.
    So all assignments from different modules are stored in one place. Easy sharing and feedback processes, including external examiners. In addition to wikis, other technologies, such as e-portfolio systems could fulfill this role.
    Making explicit opportunities for students to self evaluate, and for dialogue with staff and peers.
  • To make feedback a more active experience for learners, the University of Westminster has developed the ‘e-Reflect’ process which utilises an online learning journal for student reflection on tutor feedback. The system enables feedback to become more active and personalised and joins up hitherto separate processes. Essentially the process enables a structured dialogue between the tutor and student at 3 levels and encourages the student to think more strategically about how they will act on feedback.  Evidence suggest that this feedback process supported by technology is having a positive impact on learner engagement with feedback.
    There have been challenges with integrating the tool with other systems but the project is developing an LTI compliant version so that other institutions can operate the process within their VLE and benefit from the workflow element of the current tool.
    VIDEO CASE STUDY (Effective Assessment in a Digital Age)
  • A project at the University of Exeter aims to introduce new generation, 'authentic' assignments based around real-world and scenario based activities designed collaboratively by programme teams, students and employers. An emerging and important thread from stakeholder interviews is the ‘gap’ between what employers expect from new graduates when they turn up for work, and what new graduates themselves can offer business on day one of their new jobs.
    To bridge this gap, the project has developed a model to engage staff with principles around more employability-focused assessment design.  It encourages teaching staff to think through more authentic work scenarios in their discipline area and devise assessments that develop skills around this eg. more frequent and short notice assignments, communicating to different audiences, collaboration and team work and peer-to-peer review and critique.   
    To support this the project has developed a series of cards where technologies are ranked  according to how they can support these different assessment contexts. This approach is interesting because the model and cards are evidence-based and aligned to educational principles in the context of work-integrated assessment. As a result it is much clearer for academics to see the potential of different tools to support the development of employability skills.
    Dimensions include:
    Multiple assessment points (time)– employment assessments happen more frequently, at short notice, and out of control. Using multiples help to develop reflective thinking.
    Varied audiences – In HE the audience is the academic, whereas in employment its often peers or clients.
    Problem/data – problems tend to be more real than theoretical in employment. Data is often in ‘messier’ formats
    Collaboration – employment tasks usually collaborative, need to encourage students to work in teams with peers to help them better understand team rolesand role flexibility.
    Light structure – current thinking states assessments should be well structured, but in employment part of the challenge is to identify the relevant priorities and derive a process to reach that goal. Lighter structure can help to develop problem solving skills.
    Peer feedback and review – in employment much feedback comes from peers and clients. So there is a need for students to develop critical thinking skills in this context.
  • A project at the University of Huddersfield has been evaluating the benefits of e-submission and e-feedback, from over 5 years of use of the Turnitin suite.
    One key finding is that students feel more confident with the process.  It’s faster, more efficient, more secure, convenient and flexible.  But when it comes to receiving feedback, students see it as an inconsistency that this if often done in paper form when the assignment has been submitted electronically.  It seems illogical to them that that inconsistency exists.  
    There are also advantages to students engaging better with e-feedback and it providing benefits in terms of access for later use.  Legibility of feedback is also a key advantage.
    Benefits to students
    increased control and agency – and reduced anxiety
    For some, reduced anxiety due to increased control, over when, and where they engaged with their feedback. Clarity of date of return of feedback and results.
    improved privacy and security – students were overwhelmingly confident in the process – so confident it hadn’t got lost, and that it had been securely submitted to the tutor and not visible to others. Liked the receipting – fast and automated. As compared to dropping it in a box in a pile with others. Or feedback wasn’t given in a class setting when others ask what you got. Provided a sense of connection with the tutor, particularly for distance learners.
    sig increased efficiency and convenience – all students reported added convenience. Inc reduction in time submitting work, ‘hassle’ eg fighting with printers just before the deadline, and flexibility in submitting it to fit round their lives. Liked a midnight submission as they could work up to it.
    feedback which is clearer and easier to engage with, understand and store for later use – More legible feedback - liked the way feedback worked in Grademark – inc bubble comments. Lack of engagement due to illegibility of the feedback? One student noted that having it online made it much easier to go back when doing another assignment and incorporate the feedback in as they went.
    However, the research showed that there is a balance to be gained between giving staff flexibilty to come on board with e-marking when they are ready (which is key), and the strong entitlement students feel to it.
    Recommended a system that is robust and secure, and allows for esubmission, but allows staff to mark in the way they prefer is likely to be the one that generates most benefits and least angst for the highest proportion of stakeholders.
    It is likely a critical mass will be gained over time which should tip the balance with any reluctant staff.
    Don’t recommend mandatory trianing for students, but should make available some self-paced online resources to support those that need it.
  • In terms of the benefits to the institution as a whole, the evaluation did a time and motion study indicating that time was reduced for an administrator resulted in a saving of 137 hours per year, through the automation of date stamping, checking, logging and distributing student work.
    While EAM is strongly preferred by institutions, administrative staff and students, it is less popular with academic staff, primarily due to concerns around e-marking.
    Not surprising given the labour associated with it. The report notices that staff fell into three main groupings, all who saw and reacted to eam in different ways. The main recommendation emerging is that not one system is going to suit all, but that building flexibility in to the roll-out so that staff come on board when they are ready is likely to generate most benefits. But that most staff even those with strong reservations tend to be won over by the benefits, and a sig proportion of staff will work comfortable with it.
  • Policies needed as well as systems
    Rubrics – the literature shows that students who engage with the assessment criteria and standards are more likely to be able to manage their own learning. (Rust 2003 found increased marks for students who’d worked on these). The study here found not all students were clear, and those that were clearer had opportunities to engage online with their criteria rather than in paper form, for reasons that weren’t clear.
    The importance of students engaging with their feedback has been strongly referenced in the literature as we have seen, but findings here are interesting in that there may also be issues in the way in which that feedback is presented which students are finding it hard to interpret.
    Access to marks - if the assessment management system is integrated with the VLE are their marks and feedback closed down at the end of each module? Do students need to download/print before this happens? Can they easily transfer to their e-portfolio?
    Students attitutides to paper – were generational in this evaluation. So for example the faciliity to print out feedback could be considered.
    Analytics – shown to be a motivator, due to the presentational aspects of it bringing out aspects of the feedback not picked up in the personal feedback – enabled them to see the bigger picture of the whole cohort and how they were fitting in it. And identified common issues, reflect on their strenghts with pride, although also does highlight the inaccuracies of some students self evaluation. Although for some it could be demotivating, and can be an emotional experience given the high stakes.
  • Manchester Metropolitan University is undertaking a university-wide initiative to improve assessment and feedback practice. Their project is reviewing the entire institutional process for assessment management and developing systems to address each part of the lifecycle you see here.
    One key problem for the institution is is around assignment submission. 600,000  assessment marks need to be securely recorded for 36,000 students across a wide range of disciplines.  Despite placing some constraints on the number of assessments so the total number has reduced, they still need to manage a huge variation in assessment practice across a large and diverse institution.
  • As part of the project, the university has used data to identify critical points for assignment submission (e or otherwise). The persistent emphasis on summative assessment towards the end of the teaching programme has implications for the workload of both students and staff as well as the supporting processes.
    To improve this some modelling has been done to identify significant peaks in assignment submissions (the highest being around 17,000 individual submissions due at the end of March 2012). This clearly shows where the main peaks are in the year so is helping inform what the best interventions might be to alleviate workload pressure.  
  • One of the key messages reinforced by this programme is the importance of educational principles.  The use of the REAP principles for assessment and feedback developed at the University of Strathclyde has gained traction across the sector and provides an educational scaffold on which to drive change aligned to educational principles.  So it makes sense from the start to ensure that any technology-enhanced change is underpinned by some real understanding of the pedagogical basis for change. Once you have principles that align with your institutional contexts, you can look to drive change from there, with a shared understanding of what ‘good’ assessment and feedback looks like. The principles summarise the research, and therefore provide an evidence-based set of principles.
    This notion of principles can seems quite abstract but a number of projects are putting these into practice in a variety of ways to engage staff with the change process and encourage the appropriate use of technology to support learning.
    Nicol and McFarlane-Dick (2006) 7 principles of feedback, e.g. Should provide opportunities to act on feedback, facilitate reflection and self assessment, clarify what good performance is....Nicol (2009) 12 principles
    & David Boud.
    See printed sheet. Include Gibbs and Simpson, NUS, REAP
  • Projects have explored a range of approaches based on principle led change, and have developed a range of tools to support the approach that I wanted to touch on here. For example, the Viewpoints project at the University of Ulster has developed a workshop activity with course teams that enables them to discuss and agree what good assessment looks like (using cards with each principle on, and examples of principle based cards), and at which point in the students journey that should be implemented, and how technology can enhance it.
    EG. Clarify good performance – egs include ‘provide opportunities for discussion and reflection about criteria and standards before engaging learners in a task’ and organise a workshop where learners devise, in collaboration with you, some of their own assessment criteria for a piece of work’.
    See: https://files.pbworks.com/download/cvz0vEhUgB/jiscdesignstudio/59487220/assessment_feedback_printable_cards.pdf for cards.
    eAffect have taken a similar route, using their principles to highlight how current assessments are aligning to each, how technology can support each, and what how the final redesign again aligns back to the principles
  • One of the key messages reinforced by this programme is the importance of educational principles.  The use of the REAP principles for assessment and feedback developed at the University of Strathclyde has gained traction across the sector and provides an educational scaffold on which to drive change aligned to educational principles.  So it makes sense from the start to ensure that any technology-enhanced change is underpinned by some real understanding of the pedagogical basis for change. Once you have principles that align with your institutional contexts, you can look to drive change from there, with a shared understanding of what ‘good’ assessment and feedback looks like. The principles summarise the research, and therefore provide an evidence-based set of principles.
    This notion of principles can seems quite abstract but a number of projects are putting these into practice in a variety of ways to engage staff with the change process and encourage the appropriate use of technology to support learning.
    Nicol and McFarlane-Dick (2006) 7 principles of feedback, e.g. Should provide opportunities to act on feedback, facilitate reflection and self assessment, clarify what good performance is....Nicol (2009) 12 principles
    & David Boud.
    See printed sheet. Include Gibbs and Simpson, NUS, REAP
  • Developing a technology enhanced learning strategy

    1. 1. Developing a Strategy for Technology Enhanced Learning at UEL
    2. 2. Changing the learning landscape Welcome and introductions Sarah Davies s.davies@jisc.ac.uk @sarahjenndavies Sarah Knight s.knight@jisc.ac.uk @sarahknight
    3. 3. Changing the learning landscape Aims for today….to start a conversation… • To share current thinking and best practice in the development and implementation of technology enhanced learning (TEL) strategies from across UK higher education • To discuss the requirements for developing a successful TEL strategy at UEL • To identify approaches and models of implementation for the new TEL strategy • To explore models of engagement for both staff and students
    4. 4. Changing the learning landscape Leading TEL change across the university Approaches to implementing technology enhanced learning – key ingredients: • Developing digital literacies of staff and students • Student engagement – working in partnership • Using technology to enhance curriculum design practices and processes • Technology enhanced assessment and feedback practices
    5. 5. Changing the learning landscape Embedded change
    6. 6. Changing the learning landscape The ingredients • • • • • • Clear strategic vision Visible top management commitment Model culture change at highest level Modify the organisation to support the change Highlight the benefits of new practices Connect the interests of the institution and those affected
    7. 7. Changing the learning landscape TEL strategy development • Review where you are now with technology-enhanced learning • Link to other strategies and drivers • Based on UEL’s distinctive mission and strengths • Consider other initiatives in train • Use visioning/scenario planning techniques – and sector scanning • Ensuring the ownership and governance of the strategy by senior management • What will look different if you’re successful?
    8. 8. Changing the learning landscape Keeping it going • • • • Evaluation and review Constant communication Celebration Change managers
    9. 9. Changing the learning landscape The process
    10. 10. Changing the learning landscape Mainstreaming TEL in the sector • Institution-wide investment and pushes on eg VLE+, assessment management • Local innovation on collaborative learning, innovative pedagogies • Need to join up in ‘middle-out’ • Resurgence of interest in online delivery • Flipped classroom working well in some areas • Importance of admin, access, user-owned technology and ‘hygiene factors’ to students • Staff inevitably in different places on learning curve • If everybody did one thing differently… • But students value some kinds of consistency
    11. 11. Changing the learning landscape Mainstreaming TEL - lessons • • • • • • • • • Support communities of interest and cohorts Develop roles of professional staff to support others Work with students as agents of change Fund mini-projects in departments and services Embed into the curriculum – get into processes, guidance etc Ensure infrastructure is supportive and up to the job Consider reward and recognition Provide easy to access support Importance of teaching staff and students telling stories of successful innovation
    12. 12. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point • What does your current TEL landscape look like? • If your drive for change is successful, what will look different in 3 years’ time?
    13. 13. Changing the learning landscape Developing Digital Literacies
    14. 14. Changing the learning landscape Student engagement – working in partnership • Developing an institutional strategy for student engagement (support from NUS resources) • Understanding students expectations and experiences of technology – Jisc Digital Student project • Institutional approaches to engaging students as partners in curriculum design, developing digital literacies and assessment and feedback
    15. 15. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point Where does UEL currently sit on this 4 stage model of engagement?
    16. 16. Understanding students’ expectations in relation to TEL Changing the learning landscape • Jisc Digital Student study explored students expectations and experiences of technology use in higher education. • Literature review: overview of background work from Jisc, HEA, British Library etc. Around 20 studies reviewed. Analysed in depth: • 3 national studies • 12 institutional studies • Student focus group (x13) • Interviews with institutional practitioners (x12) • Interviews with stakeholders (NUS, SCONUL, RLUK, RUGIT, UCISA, Jisc) • Join the conversation http://digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org
    17. 17. Changing the learning landscape A checklist…. • Manage student expectations • Equip students to learn effectively with digital technology • Support students and staff to use their own devices (BYOD) • Ensure digital content is device neutral where appropriate • Enhance the curriculum with digital activities and experiences • Engage students in projects to enhance their digital experience • Develop and reward innovators • Encourage a culture of continuous organisational research • Consider digital experiences alongside other aspects of the student experience
    18. 18. Changing the learning landscape Working in partnership – institutional approaches • Some examples of institutional approaches to engaging students as partners, champions and collaborators in the use of technology to support learning and teaching: • Students as digital pioneers –Oxford Brookes University, Greenwich University • Working in partnership –University of Reading and University of Winchester/Bath Spa University • Students as change agents – University of Exeter and Birmingham City University
    19. 19. Changing the learning landscape Students as digital pioneers – Oxford Brookes University • Oxford Brookes InStePP project - Student partnerships offer a way to join up provision for digital literacies for staff and students across the institution by establishing, supporting and building recognition for the role of student ‘ePioneers’ within existing core academic and e-learning development activities. Resources available: • 3-way partnership agreement model • Development wheel • Recruitment documentation • ePioneer Role descriptors • Endorsed professional body (ILM) scheme: FutureConsultants course outline
    20. 20. Changing the learning landscape Students as digital pioneers – University of Greenwich • Greenwich Digital Literacies in Transition project - cross-university studentships foster a community of student-led research to support and feed into all other aspects of the project. Termed the IRG (Interdisciplinary Research Group), this group of students, their mentors and members of staff from all aspects of the institution will engage in baselining activities as well as develop digital literacy OERs. Resources available:  • Student journey questionnaire • Student journey badges • Resources relating to the Interdisciplinary Research Group e.g. recruitment process
    21. 21. Changing the learning landscape Students as partners – Reading, Winchester and Bath Spa • University of Reading Digitally Ready project has worked with students as partners in digital projects with academics, students as researchers, students feeding in their stories to inform work on the project and students undertaking work directly for the project • Student Fellows at Bath Spa and Winchester - The FASTECH project is focused on enhancing feedback and assessment processes through the use of technology.  The project has recruited Student Fellows to participate in research activities, generate ideas, develop case studies, write blogs and attend and present at conferences. They are the interface between the project team and students and lecturers.   
    22. 22. Changing the learning landscape Student Academic Partners – Birmingham City University • The Jisc T-SPARC project engaged with students through the University’s Student Academic Partners (SAP) programme as part of a review of curriculum design practices and processes.   • SAP aims to integrate students into the teaching and pedagogic research community within BCU in order to develop collaboration between students and staff.  • The T-SPARC project also produced a wider stakeholder engagement model which could be used when considering the development of student engagement activities.
    23. 23. Changing the learning landscape Students as change agents – University of Exeter • • • • Students have been given opportunities to work in partnership with university staff in order to address the challenges of using technology with large and diverse cohorts. They have undertaken research on student views and perceptions, provided recommendations and solutions for practice, and have supported staff in bringing about wide-scale changes in teaching. Much of this work evolved through the Jisc funded Integrate project . Resources are available on the project website.   The work continues through projects such as the Cascade Digital Literacies project which involves postgraduate researchers.  The Student Engagement Handbook: Practice in Higher Education; Edited by Dunne and Owen; ISBN: 978-1-78190-423-7
    24. 24. Good practice in setting up student partnerships should: Establish the case for student partnerships Establish the case for student partnerships including identification of needs and mutual benefits. Change Agent Network
    25. 25. Establish the case for student partnerships  Identify drivers and needs  Map the potential benefits and impact to policies for e.g. graduate attributes, employability, digital literacy, career planning, student experience, MIS, TEL etc.  Identify potential benefits and impact for students, staff, employers and the institution.  Map the potential benefits and impact to institutional strategies  Establish cross-institutional approaches to working collaboratively.  Engage stakeholders from across the institution in establishing the case for student partnerships.  ……………………………………………………………  Engage employers and professional/sector bodies.  ………………………………………... ………………… Instituting student partnerships Based on the Viewpoints model: http://www.viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk
    26. 26. Changing the learning landscape Next steps… Join the Jisc supported Change Agent Network – http://www.ChangeAgentsNetwork.co.uk and consider attending the event for staff and students at University of Winchester on 18-19 th February #CAN2014 Explore further guidance: Jisc guidance - http://bit.ly/1aZunJW http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/students-as-partners http://www.nus.org.uk
    27. 27. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point • What approaches to student engagement would work well at UEL? • What existing practices can be built on? • Key points for noting for later discussions
    28. 28. Using technology to enhance curriculum design “Curriculum design and approval is one of the few institutional processes in which almost all faculty level processes and central services have a stake.” – University of Strathclyde
    29. 29. Using technology to enhance curriculum design Considered use of technology as part of the curriculum design process can help you to: •develop new solutions to address organisational, technical and educational issues •communicate in new ways with stakeholders to facilitate discussion and collaboration •access, record and capture information to inform your curriculum design •improve access to guidance for those designing and describing curricula •model, test and refine new approaches in curriculum design
    30. 30. Using technology to enhance curriculum design Considered use of technology as part of the curriculum design process can help you to: •improve communication flows both internally and externally •provide ‘single-truth’ sources of information that are accurate and can be interrogated and analysed to suit multiple purposes •develop effective and agile validation processes that are more responsive to employer and community needs •increase consistency both in terms of the learner experience and quality assurance •develop more efficient administrative processes ‘The potential gain of technology-enabled systems is not just http://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/using-technology-to-improve-curriculum-design one of increased efficiency. A clear finding from those who have invested in them is that improved approval and review processes aid rather than inhibit good educational design.’
    31. 31. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point How does technology support the curriculum design processes and practices at UEL?
    32. 32. Manchester Metropolitan University – SRC Project • Manchester Metropolitan University aimed to develop curricula that were "The most significantthe needs of students and employers. They developed more responsive to achievement has been the undertaking of a major institutional transformation programme. This has involved a re-design streamlined documentation and transparent approval and review processes of the entire undergraduate curriculum, some 2400 course units. including an innovative board game based on to focus design and outcomes that The objective of this re-write was curriculumon learning approval processes. students could understand, standardise the number of credits for any particular unit, streamline the number of assessments per unit and link assessments to approval processes were replaced by a centralised light-of Faculty-based learning outcomes and learning outcomes to a set generic employability outcomes." touch review and approval system ensuring a more consistent student experience across all units of learning. This work ran alongside another strategic initiative, that of re-engineering the entire undergraduate curriculum to provide a sharper focus on formative assessment.
    33. 33. Birmingham City University – T-Sparc Project • Birmingham City University has developed a radically new approach to course approval that facilitates the integration of authentic, real-world practices into formal approval processes. "Our intention has been to move from a position where curriculum design as a process is One-off, paper-based validation events are replaced by a undertaken primarily as a prelude to an end-point continuous process of curriculum development and enhancement approval digital media and supported through Microsoft® captured viaevent to one that embraces iterative collaborative design from which approval SharePoint®. A rough guide to curriculum design takes course cascades." teams through the innovative approach and digital recording issues are addressed within the institutional data protection policy.
    34. 34. Cardiff University – PALET Project • Cardiff University worked on several fronts to ensure more effective communication of course information. • • "The headline achievement of the PALET project can They developed web services to enable academic schools to manage the be described in straightforward terms: It is to have publication of module data; they also restructured the information held in the created a new, holistic context for how Cardiff student information system by developing templates for module and University approaches the design, management and programme descriptions. communication of its educational provision in the future.“ These developments have transformed the ability of staff and students to access programme information and improved the likelihood of providing consistent and accurate information.
    35. 35. The Open University – OULDI project • Curriculum design is an inherently collaborative activity. Learning design tools enable curriculum designers to model a new"Challenge and change in curriculum design or revised curriculum proposal, then share and discuss the outcomes withcommunities, process, stakeholders. • visualisation and The practice acrossdeveloped a tool providing Open University six universities." a compendium of approaches in learning design and built into the design the ability to collaborate on design activities at a distance. In addition, they have developed a set of course mapping and profiling templates and activities to help designers visualise the consequences of design decisions on pedagogy, cost and the student experience.
    36. 36. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point • Are there opportunities for TEL to support and enhance curriculum design practices and processes at UEL? • Key points for noting for later discussions
    37. 37. Changing the learning landscape Technology Enhanced Assessment and Feedback • Jisc Assessment and Feedback programme (20112014) • 20 projects and 30 institutions involved across the UK • 3 strands focused on institutional change, evaluation of technologies and software development • Supporting large-scale changes to assessment and feedback practice through technology www.jisc.ac.uk/assessmentandfeedback http://bit.ly/jiscdsaf
    38. 38. Changing the learning landscape Technology-enhanced assessment & feedback ‘The wide range of ways in which technology can be used to support assessment and feedback.’ These technologies may be generic (such as VLEs, wikis, podcasts, e-portfolio systems) or purpose-built (such as onscreen assessment systems and tools to support peer review)
    39. 39. Changing the learning landscape Assessment and feedback challenges • Strategy and policy • Infrastructure • Assessment and feedback practice • Engagement
    40. 40. Changing the learning landscape Technology
    41. 41. Technology to support…
    42. 42. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point • What does technology-enhanced assessment and feedback mean to you? • What are your current successes in this area? • What are the ongoing challenges?
    43. 43. Changing the learning landscape Engaging learners with feedback, and providing opportunities for ‘feedforward’ • Feedback is…
    44. 44. Changing the learning landscape University of Westminster “It has helped I think because since then my marks have shot up.” See Reflecting on Feedback video case study at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/digia ssess
    45. 45. Changing the learning landscape Employability – University of Exeter
    46. 46. Assessment Management – University of Huddersfield • Benefits - Students ‘There is strong evidence to suggest that not only is electronic assessment management their preference, but that those who came to appreciate its attendant benefits then begin to see electronic assessment as their entitlement’ EBEAM final report • • • • • Increased control and agency Reduced anxiety Improved privacy and security Increased efficiency and convenience Feedback which is clearer and easier to engage with, understand and store for later use
    47. 47. University of Huddersfield
    48. 48. Key points… • Policies and buy in needed around assessment and feedback turnaround policies • Rubrics providing criteria for marks and feedback need to be clear • Need to consider how long students have access to marks and feedback • Consider supporting staff professional development in the writing of feedback that supports dialogue and feedforward • Analytics can be a positive motivator and is worth pursuing to inform decision-making • AND need to remember that for some students and staff, paper-based formats for assessment and feedback remain important , and need to be considered
    49. 49. Manchester Metropolitan University: Assessment Lifecycle
    50. 50. MMU: e-Submission
    51. 51. REAP principles of good assessment and feedback • Good assessment and feedback should: • Clarify what good performance is (goals, criteria, standards). • Facilitate the development of reflection and self-assessment in learning • Deliver high quality feedback to students: that enables them to selfcorrect • Encourage peer and student-teacher dialogue around learning • Encourage positive motivational beliefs & self esteem through assessment • Provide opportunities to act on feedback • Provide information to teachers that can be used to help shape their teaching (making learning visible) • Nicol and Macfarlane-Dick (2006)
    52. 52. Principle-led change Viewpoints approach http://wiki.ulster.ac.uk/ display/VPR/Home “Workshops succeeded, impressively, in creating change locally but, importantly, in seeding change beyond the immediate participation experience." Emeritus Professor David Nicol
    53. 53. Changing the learning landscape Jisc online guidance • Four short guides are now available on four key themes: • Changing assessment and feedback practice – how to approach largescale change in assessment and feedback practice with the help of technology • Electronic assessment management – using technology to support the assessment lifecycle, from the electronic submission of assignments to marking and feedback • Enhancing student employability through technology-supported assessment and feedback – how the curriculum can help develop the skills and competencies needed in the world of work • Feedback and feed forward: using technology to support learner longitudinal development •
    54. 54. Changing the learning landscape Reflection point • What educational principles underpin effective assessment and feedback at UEL? • Which areas of assessment and feedback are key for UEL and how can TEL support this? • Key points for noting for later discussions
    55. 55. Changing the learning landscape Further information • Jisc e-Learning programme: www.jisc.ac.uk/elearningprogramme • The Jisc Design Studio: http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com • Assessment and Feedback resources: http://bit.ly/jiscdsaf • Digital Literacies resources: • bit.ly/diglitds • Using Technology to improve curriculum design http://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/using-technology-to-improve-curriculumdesign • The Digital Student: http://digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org • Change Agents Network: www.changeagentsnetwork.co.uk
    56. 56. Changing the learning landscape Group discussion
    57. 57. Changing the learning landscape Group discussion Group Activity – Discussions in two groups: •a) From what we have heard what do we need to know more about? •b) From what we have heard what are the top three areas/topics that we need to focus on?
    58. 58. Changing the learning landscape Actions and next steps

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