Development in the Field<br />Sarah Lewis, B.A. Economics. September 24, 2010 <br />for INDEV University of Waterloo<br />
After surviving the travel to your destination, organizing accommodations, testing the local cuisine and meeting a few peo...
Reasons for being in Ghana (2007)<br />To be a catalyst for human development<br />To experience a new culture<br />To lea...
Presentation Outline<br />Introduction<br />Living and learning<br />Field work<br />Conclusions <br />Traditional ceremon...
Geography of my Experience<br />Kitchener-Waterloo Ontario<br />University of Waterloo Undergraduate Studies<br />Nipigon,...
Living and Working in the Developing World <br />Your profile as a foreigner impacts community trust & learning<br />Where...
Accelerated Learning<br />Information is found in the people<br />Active listening, Careful questioning, <br />Experientia...
Village Stay: Experiencial Learning<br />Stirring TuoZafi with Justa’s family<br />
Mapping – Nipigon example<br />We map what we think is significant. For example, this map centers around roadways, work an...
Field Work... Excited?!<br />	“The successful field worker who is capable of stimulating and supporting well-rounded, comm...
Cameroon: Water and Sanitation<br />Partner:  Engineers Without Borders Canada (EWB) and Projet intégré pour la promotion ...
Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) Approach<br />Behaviour change to improve health and reduce wa...
PHAST Approach<br />Developed by the World Health Organization, for more info, follow the link: <br />World Health Organiz...
Project Challenges <br />Organizational management in PIPAD & continuity between EWB volunteers<br />Politics of latrine l...
Ghana: Agricultural Development<br />Partner: EWB Canada and the Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture 2007-2008<br />...
Moving to a new equilibrium state<br />Developed the Agriculture as a Business Program<br />If  the stages of farming deve...
Engineers Without Borders Annual Report 2009<br />
Project Challenges<br />Competing demands on the Ministry of Food and Agriculture as an implementing agency<br />Identifyi...
Field Work: Who is Poor? <br />“I know that a family is poor when I see the boy carrying a goat to the market to sell ever...
Field WorkWho are “target beneficiaries”?<br />Do we know how to identify these groups, what their <br />interests are, an...
Field WorkCompetingto implement development<br />International institutions<br />Foreign governments<br />National  & loca...
How change may not happen<br />Development workers aim to create positive change, to move from             to  <br />Right...
After living and working in the developing world for 8 months, it is your first day back in Canada. <br />What has been ac...
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Development In The Field Revised Uw Presentation 24 Sept 2010

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Development In The Field Revised Uw Presentation 24 Sept 2010

  1. 1. Development in the Field<br />Sarah Lewis, B.A. Economics. September 24, 2010 <br />for INDEV University of Waterloo<br />
  2. 2. After surviving the travel to your destination, organizing accommodations, testing the local cuisine and meeting a few people, it is your first day at work. <br />Why are you here?<br />
  3. 3. Reasons for being in Ghana (2007)<br />To be a catalyst for human development<br />To experience a new culture<br />To learn how to best contribute to human development throughout my career<br />One thing is certain, your understanding of the world is about to change<br />
  4. 4. Presentation Outline<br />Introduction<br />Living and learning<br />Field work<br />Conclusions <br />Traditional ceremony at home in Tongo, UER<br />
  5. 5. Geography of my Experience<br />Kitchener-Waterloo Ontario<br />University of Waterloo Undergraduate Studies<br />Nipigon, Ontario Canada<br />Economic Development Officer<br />Cameroon, Central Africa <br />PHAST Water and Sanitation<br />Ghana, West Africa<br />Agriculture As A Business<br />
  6. 6. Living and Working in the Developing World <br />Your profile as a foreigner impacts community trust & learning<br />Where you live<br />How you dress<br />How you act<br />Use common sense<br />Culture shock<br />Water & sanitation<br />Personal safety<br />Traffic<br />Health care<br />Reverse culture shock<br />Enjoy yourself!<br /> Charity in the courtyard in Tongo, UER Ghana<br />
  7. 7. Accelerated Learning<br />Information is found in the people<br />Active listening, Careful questioning, <br />Experiential learning, transect walk, mapping<br />Crosschecking for accuracy<br />“the important information is likely to be that which one does not know that one does not know.” <br />– Eric Dudley (1993)<br />
  8. 8. Village Stay: Experiencial Learning<br />Stirring TuoZafi with Justa’s family<br />
  9. 9. Mapping – Nipigon example<br />We map what we think is significant. For example, this map centers around roadways, work and home sites. In a mapping exercise, a group develops a map collaboratively and identify sites that are significant to the community.<br />
  10. 10. Field Work... Excited?!<br /> “The successful field worker who is capable of stimulating and supporting well-rounded, community-based integrated rural development has to be a kind of renaissance generalist. <br /> Over stretched and under-resourced, the field worker must juggle the issues and strike pragmatic compromises between policies which tend to come to the field in the form of contradictory messages. “ <br />- Eric Dudley, The Critical Villager<br />
  11. 11. Cameroon: Water and Sanitation<br />Partner: Engineers Without Borders Canada (EWB) and Projet intégré pour la promotion de l'auto-développement (PIPAD) a local organisation in Cameroon 2004<br />Objective: Reduction of waterborne disease, improved sanitation conditions, construction and community management of latrines<br />Funding: Association of Italian Churches, Medical donations from Italy, Engineers Without Borders, CIDA, FAO<br />Activities: Participatory Health and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) program implementation, Project planning and fundraising workshops for community leaders, Evaluation of latrine building project<br />Results: Partnership terminated<br />
  12. 12. Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) Approach<br />Behaviour change to improve health and reduce waterborne disease <br />
  13. 13. PHAST Approach<br />Developed by the World Health Organization, for more info, follow the link: <br />World Health Organization_PHAST<br />Participatory Health and Sanitation Transformation has three main objectives:<br />The promotion of improved hygiene behaviour.<br />The promotion of improvements in sanitation.<br />Community management of water and sanitation facilities.<br />It does this by:<br />Demonstrating the relationship between sanitation and health status.<br />Increasing the self esteem of community members.<br />Empowering the community to plan environmental improvements and to own and operate water and sanitation facilities.<br />
  14. 14. Project Challenges <br />Organizational management in PIPAD & continuity between EWB volunteers<br />Politics of latrine location and access<br />Identifying barriers <br /> to hygiene/sanitation<br />Germ theory of <br /> disease<br />
  15. 15. Ghana: Agricultural Development<br />Partner: EWB Canada and the Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture 2007-2008<br />Objective: Food security, Dissemination of technology, Disaster relief<br />Project: Agriculture as a Business <br />Activities: Development of the Agriculture As a Business program with farmer groups and AEAs, Evaluation of profitability of small scale vegetable farmers, Drought and flood impact report<br />Results: (EWB report)<br />
  16. 16. Moving to a new equilibrium state<br />Developed the Agriculture as a Business Program<br />If the stages of farming development are like snakes and ladders... <br />We create ladders<br />
  17. 17. Engineers Without Borders Annual Report 2009<br />
  18. 18. Project Challenges<br />Competing demands on the Ministry of Food and Agriculture as an implementing agency<br />Identifying barriers to agricultural development<br />History of financial <br /> incentives from <br />past donors<br />
  19. 19. Field Work: Who is Poor? <br />“I know that a family is poor when I see the boy carrying a goat to the market to sell every week in the dry season when the prices are low. It means that they are selling stock for food in desperation.”<br />Introduction to a Household’s balance sheet<br />
  20. 20. Field WorkWho are “target beneficiaries”?<br />Do we know how to identify these groups, what their <br />interests are, and what approach will be understandable?<br />
  21. 21. Field WorkCompetingto implement development<br />International institutions<br />Foreign governments<br />National & local government<br />International charities<br />International development org.<br />Local not for profit org.<br />... field workers<br />
  22. 22. How change may not happen<br />Development workers aim to create positive change, to move from to <br />Right : When our work is not aligned with the interest of the intended beneficiary, the project outputs/targets may be “achieved”, ie. Goats were distributed in a ‘goat giving program’, but the situation has not actually shifted to a more positive state<br />Left: When our work is aligned with the interest of the intended beneficiary, the achievement of the project objectives will more likely have lead to a positive change<br />
  23. 23. After living and working in the developing world for 8 months, it is your first day back in Canada. <br />What has been achieved? <br />Did you have fun?<br />

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