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Connally Playbook (digital)

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Connally Playbook (digital)

  1. 1. M A K E R P L A Y B O O K STE(A)M TRUCK CONNALLY ELEMENTARY SPRING 2016
  2. 2. To close opportunity gaps and provide lifelong opportunities by transform- ing teaching and learning through an experiential maker approach that brings together youth and adult learners within collaborative communities. COMMUNITY GUILDS MISSION STATEMENT CONTENTS Introduction Letter from the Director Chapter 1: Our Story History & Stats Our Team Our Vision for the Future Chapter 2: At-A-Glance STE(A)M Truck Sample Day Connally 20-Day Plan Chapter 3: Maker Kit In Review Our Badging System Tool of the Day Cards Word of the Day Cards STEAM Trunks Lesson Plans Lesson Plans Glossary Partners & Supporters 4 - 5 5 6 - 9 6 - 7 8 9 10 - 11 10 11 12 - 45 12 - 13 14 - 15 16 - 25 26 - 35 36 - 53 54 - 61 63 - 64 65
  3. 3. JASON MARTIN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR with community experts, build something together. Our work, based on a “Maker Mindset”, has struck a chord with educators, like Donna Davis, a 5th grade teacher in Atlanta Public Schools, who became inspired by the programming after seeing the impact it had on her stu- dents. But, most importantly, Donna leaves better equipped to bring similar instructional concepts and methodolo- gies into her classroom after STE(A)M Truck has driven away. Our mission is to close opportunity gaps and pro- vide lifelong opportunities by transforming teaching and learning through an experi- ential maker approach that brings together youth and adult learners within collab- orative communities. At Connally Elemen- tary School, STE(A)M Truck will conduct 20 visits this school year. A day by day re- view can be found on page 11 of this Playbook. Our work is being generously funded with a grant from the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation. Upon completion Connally will receive a $2,000 pass thru mini-grant to seed or supplement your own maker- space. In addition, STE(A)M Truck staff will again return Dear Colleagues, Thanks for jumping on board! We hope you find our Playbook useful and inspiring. Since 2014, Com- munity Guilds has focused on delivering an innovative, gap-closing approach to education through its mobile makerspace, STE(A)M Truck. As a classroom teach- er in Title I schools for 10 years, I believe Community Guilds provides program- ming critical to building non-cognitive and 21st Century STEM skills. Much like what happens in class- room across the country, we ignite a passion in students to learn about the real world by tackling real problems, designing solutions and then, to Connally and provide 12 follow up coaching ses- sions designed to support your work over the next 3-6 months. Creating a thriving STE(A)M community is a foundational component. Having both students and educators engage in the pro- gram helps embed the core components of learning and teaching in daily practice, and having community mem- bers as part of the experience helps make that learning “real-world relevant.” While STE(A)M Truck will always be limited by the number of students it can serve directly, it seeks to extend its impact through the engagement of the adults in the community, creating a “ripple effect” of transformative learning.
  4. 4. 7STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK6 CHAPTER 1 Our Story Research has been clear: Access to hands-on build- ing, tinkering, and the kinds of curriculum offered through STE(A) M Truck can increase access to STEM careers and build the skills critical for long term success. How- ever, the tools, expertise, and time needed to utilize these types of strategies are usually unavailable in public schools, and especially so in public schools serving low income communities. Our program provides access to materials, expertise, and curriculum that can reach students during the school day directly on their own campus. STE(A)M Truck is Com- munity Guilds’ core program, delivered in partnership with ele- mentary and middle schools and after-school programs serving high-need student populations. The experience is anchored in three strategic “levers”: • Providing students with hands-on opportunities to make and learn through in- dividual and team- based ex- periences, building non-cog- nitive skills and igniting excitement about learning • Connecting students to community members with maker-related careers, giving them exposure to mentors and careers different from those they typically access on a daily basis (e.g., artists, industrial designers) and expanding their worldview about future possibilities • Equipping educators with the ability to shape instruc- tion through experiential learning, enabling them to PLAYBOOKCHAPTER1:OURSTORY deepen and reinforce the learnings from the STE(A) M Truck experience and take them to more students, be- yond those directly served by the program. Since 2014, Community Guilds has focused on delivering an innovative, gap-closing approach to education through its mobile makerspace, STE(A)M (Sciece, Technology, Engineering, (Arts), and Math) Truck, targeting elementary and middle school students. The STE(A)M Truck experience is anchored by a rigorous, experiential learning- based curriculum, which is brought to life in a mobile maker-space with the support and collective expertise of the local community. STE(A) M Truck creates a community of adult STE(A)M role models – “maker-mentors,” STE(A)M designers, and local artists, along with “traditional” educators – and connects them closely with youth; together, they tackle real problems, design solutions, and build things. Over the course of the program, students learn the design process and develop a sense of self- efficacy as they create their own solutions. Community Guilds also strikes a chord with educators, who become inspired themselves by the experience and the impact on students, and leave better-equipped to bring similar instructional concepts and methodologies into the classroom. In its first full year of operation, over 300 students completed a STE(A)M Truck 20 day program. Community Guilds has partnered with several organizations, including district schools (e.g., Atlanta Public Schools), charter schools (e.g., KIPP Metro Atlanta, The Kindezi Schools), and community organizations (e.g., Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta). Community Guilds’ programming has also helped build students’ non-cognitive skills and awareness of a breadth of life opportunities they need to be successful. NON-COGNITIVE SKILLS • 97%+ of students improved non-cognitive skills • 90%+ of students performed at satisfactory competency levels on non-cognitive skills • Increased student interest and willingness to take risks and try new things in learning • Improved classroom behav- ior (e.g., significant decline in discipline referrals) STEM SKILLS AND AWARENESS •  87%+ of students have im- proved applied STEM skills • 2/3 (and as high as 90%) of students perform at satis- factory competency levels on STEM skills • 73%+ of students have increased interest and con- fidence in pursuing a STEM career
  5. 5. 9STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK8 OUR TEAM JASON MARTIN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MIKE STASNY ARTIST IN RESIDENCE SARAH LASHINSKY MAKER MENTOR MARSHA FRANCIS STEM DESIGNER DOMENIC LIGGETT OPERATIONS MANAGER KEITH DEVRIES MAKER MENTOR PLAYBOOKCHAPTER1:OURSTORY OUR VISION Over the next five years, Community Guilds is committed to strengthening and deepening its impact, while driving to greater scale and sustainability, in two main ways. First, Community Guilds will continue to refine its STE(A)M Truck and student engagement model, both by codifying and standardizing certain elements and by piloting variations to others. Second, Community Guilds will work to deepen its sup- ports to educators over time, extending design thinking techniques into the classroom and creating longer-term sustainable impact. The overall value proposition is powerful. Community Guilds enables students in even the least- resourced schools to access making-focused learning experiences, and gives districts and schools the opportunity to explore the benefits of an innovation lab without building one, while beginning to deepen their own capacity around experiential learning. Over the next five years, Community Guilds is committed to strengthening and deepening its impact, while driving to greater scale and sustainability, in two main ways. First, Community Guilds will continue to refine its STE(A)M Truck and student engagement model, both by codifying and standardizing certain elements and by piloting variations to others. Second, Community Guilds will work to deepen its supports to educators over time, extending design thinking techniques into the classroom and creating longer-term sustainable impact. In parallel, Community Guilds has set ambitious yet achievable plans to grow its reach while preserving its high bar for quality and maintaining a low cost for the programming (today, an average program cost per student of $200-300). Community Guilds aims to more than double its reach in 2015- 16, with plans to serve roughly 900-1,000 students per platform per year at full utilization, and to expand to four platforms serving over 4,000 students in Atlanta and near-in districts by 2020. OUR FIVE-YEAR PLAN Four more trucks by 2020 Reach 5.4K students in 2019- 2020 school year “Over the course of the pro- gram, students learn the de- sign process and develop a sense of self- efficacy as they create their own solutions. “
  6. 6. 11STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK10 CHAPTER 2 At•A•Glance Our recipe for creating change lies in our impactful 20-Day series of in-school pro- gramming. Each day consists of four main activites, some of which happen as a class, and some of which take place with students broken down into groups of 4-6. A sample day may look a lot like this, with flexibility for projects as neces- sary. STE(A)M TRUCK SAMPLE DAY Huddle (5 mins) The goal is to have all the elements connect seamlessly, and to create a class culture. •• Game plan •• Word of the Day (WoD) •• Tool of the Day (ToD) Activation (5-10 mins) One or two of the below will be done depending on time, either inside or outside depending on activity. remain the same for the entire program. One adult will mentor one crew. • Icebreaker ( 1-2 mins) • Energizer (3-5 mins) • Game (5-10 mins) • STEAM Trunk (10 mins) Build (30 min) Typically in small groups Time range depends on Build. Longer Builds mean shorter Acti- vation activity Reflection (5-10 min) •• Quick check in (scale 1-5) •• Shout outs/ Fabulous Failures •• Journal reflection •• Next steps/reminders •• “STE(A)M Truck on 3” cheer PLAYBOOKCHAPTER2:AT•A•GLANCE DAY 1 APRIL 12 Spark Day DAY 2 APRIL 13 Brick Build DAY 3 APRIL 14 Journal/Name Tag Day; 1/2 DAY 4 APRIL 19 Journal/Name Tag Day; 2/2 DAY 5 APRIL 20 Safety Badging DAY 6 APRIL 21 Design Thinking DAY 7 APRIL 26 Bridge Build Day 1/2 DAY 8 APRIL 27 Bridge Build Day 2/2 DAY 9 APRIL 28 Two Day Build A; Day 1/2 DAY 10 MAY 3 Two Day Build A; Day 2/2 DAY 11 MAY 4 Two Day Build B; Day 1/2 DAY 12 MAY 5 Two Day Build B; Day 2/2 DAY 13 MAY 10 Big Build; Day 1/6 DAY 14 MAY 11 Big Build; Day 2/6 DAY 15 MAY 12 Big Build; Day 3/6 DAY 16 MAY 17 Big Build; Day 4/6 DAY 17 MAY 18 Big Build; Day 5/6 DAY 18 MAY 19 Big Build; Day 6/6 DAY 19 MAY 23 Share Prep Day DAY 20 MAY 24 Share Day Over 20 days, we start to build the capacity for educators and schools to continue to do this work even after we are gone. CONNALLY CLASS SCHEDULES CLASS A 11:00 am - 11:50 am CLASS B 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm CLASS C 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
  7. 7. 13STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK12 PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT Grounded in both constructiv- ist1,2,3 (Kafai & Resnick, 1996; Piaget, 1956; Vygotsky,1978) and constructionist4 (Papert, 1991) learning theories, maker spaces are commonly defined as “informal sites for creative production in art, science, and engineering where people of all ages blend digital and phys- ical technologies to explore ideas, learn technical skills, and create new products”5 (Sheri- dan et al., 2014, p. 505). They are spaces where children and adults can gather, share, and explore6 (Britton, 2012). While much making is situated in com- munity maker spaces, innova- tors are increasingly exploring its potential to support formal education, so students and teachers can work together to create, solve problems, collab- orate, and develop new skills (Halverson & Sheridan, 2014). The White House Maker Faire recently implemented policies for schools to pursue hands-on innovation and manufacturing7 (Fried & Wetstone, 2014). Our Maker Kit is designed as a) a takeaway for your class’s STE(A)M Truck experience, and b) a resource to use to further thought and discussion around making. Keep this as a reference in your classroom. CHAPTER 2 Maker Kit 1. Kafai, Y. B., & Resnick, M. (1996). Constructionism in practice : De- signing, thinking, and learning in a digital world. Mahwah, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 2. Piaget, J. (1956). The Origins of Child Intelligence. New York: Inter- national University 3. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in so- ciety: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 4. Papert, S. (1991). Situating construc- tionism. In I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism (pp. 1–11). Norwood, NJ: Ablex. 5. Sheridan, K., Halverson, E. R., Brahms, L., Litts, B., Owens, T., & Jacobs-Priebe, L. (2014). Learning in the making: A comparative case study of three makerspaces. Harvard Educational Review, 84(4). 6. Britton, L. (2012). A fabulous labora- tory: The makerspace at Fayetteville Free Library. Public Administration Review, 1– 5. 7. Fried, B., & Wetstone, K. (2014). President Obama at the White House Maker Faire:“Today’s D.I.Y. is to- morrow’s ‘made in America’” [White House blog post]. Retrieved from http://www.whitehouse.gov/ blog/2014/06/18/president-obama- white-house-maker-faire-today-s-diy- tomorrow-s-made-america IN THIS KIT • Our Badging System • Tool of the Day • Word of the Day • STEAM Trunk Activites You Can do in Your Classroom
  8. 8. 15STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK14 OUR BADGES PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT OUR BADGING SYSTEM STE(A)M Truck Badg- es have been developed to pull a common thread through the various projects and activities that we do at STE(A)M Truck as well as provide an additional incentive to our makers. The badges have been written with three things in mind: the funda- mental principles of the maker movement, STE(A)M Truck’s Core Competencies, and Geor- gia Department of Education’s Performance Standards. The badges represent the knowledge and skills that young makers develop during their explorative time with the STE(A)M Truck. Earning the Iteration badge,for example, shows that a maker has demon- strated the essential ability to evaluate and revise a project in development while strengthen- ing their perseverance, innova- tion, and design thinking. A skill such as this is not only essential but it is easily transferable to the real world. A 2014 mi- cro-credentialing and badging study found that when learners were engaged in a badging system, “the use of badges helped motivate them toward further autonomous study”8 (Elliot & Clayton, 2014). Often makers can easily see the value in the final product of a given project, but earning badges that demonstrate the built-in knowledge and skills helps them more appreciate the les- sons learned in the process and builds on their intrinsic motiva- tion. We’ve seen an increase in student engagement since badges have been introduced; students are eager to hear about the next badge that they can earn. HOW STE(A)M TRUCK BADGES WORK As makers actively participate in various STE(A) M Truck projects and activi- ties, they’ll be made aware of the potential badges that can be earned. There are particular requirements, or earmarks, for each badge. Many of the earmarks are built right into the projects and activities that the STE(A)M Truck provides. STE(A)M Team members will sign off the various earmarks until they are all completed and the maker has earned the badge. Engagement with the badging earmarks provides makers with an opportunity for reflection that builds on our integrated journaling and reflection sessions. The 2014 study highlighted badging as a means by which leaners can “engage in a process of reflec- tion and self improvement. Through reflection individuals make meaning of their current capabilities and identify areas for improvement and person- al growth” (Elliot & Clayton, 2014). 8. Elliot, R., Clayton, J., (2014). Ex- ploring the use of micro-credential- ing and digital badges in learning environments to encourage motivation to learn and achieve. Retrieved from http://researcharchive.wintec. ac.nz/3546/1/276-Elliott.pdf CONNECTION TO OUR CORE COMPETENCIES All badges fall under the realm of knowledge, skills, and disposition, and support the following competencies: • Design Thinking • Creativity & Innova- tion • Grit & Perseverance • Curiosity • Optimism and Zest • Focus & Self-Control • Use of STEM Tools • Measurement
  9. 9. 17STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK16 TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLS OF THE DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  10. 10. 19STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK18 TOOLS OF THE DAY PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT solderingiron • suppliesheattosolderso thatitcanconnecttwopiec- esofmetal • composedofaheatedmet- altipandinsulatedhandle • cost$20-$70 circuitbreadboard • areusablebaseforthe prototypingofelectronics • composedofaheated metaltipandinsulated handle • cost$5 cordlessdrill • electricdrillthatrunsoffof rechargeablebatteries • allowamakertodrilland drivescrewsquickly,and intightspaces • cost$80-$250 tapemeasure • aflexiblerulerusedto measuregreatleng • thosedesignedforcar- pentryusearetrctible stiff,metalribbon • cost$10-$30 ducttape • strongpolyethylenetape, oftenusedtosealheating, ventilation,andACducts • developedduringWWII asawater-resistantseal forstoringammunition • cost$3-$6 square • aseriesoftoolsusedto findanglesandmark rightangles • typesinclude:speed square(shown),t-square, combinationsquare • cost$5-$30 wrench • providesgripinapplying torquetoturnobjects • usuallytoturnrotaryfasten- ers,likenutsandbolts,orto keepthemfromturning • cost$10-$30foranadjust- able,$50-$90foraset CNCrouter • shortfor“Computer NumericalControl” • usescomputercontrols tocutdifferentmaterials • cost$2,000-$20,000 littleBits • electronicsmodules designedforprototyping andlearning • snaptogetherw.magnets • cost$100-$300forkits, $10-$30forcomponets 3Dprinter • creates3Dmodelsfrom computerprogrammed designs • formslayersofmelted plasticoveroneanother • cost$300-$3,000 calipers • usedtomeasurethe distancebetweentwo oppositesidesofan object • cost$25-$100 lasercutter • usesahigh-powerlaser tocutorengravethin materials • typicallyusedwith wood,cardboard,acryl- ic,andsomemetals • cost$200-$8,000
  11. 11. 21STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK20 TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLS OF THE DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY TOOLO F T H E DAY PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  12. 12. 23STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK22 HOW TO: USE THESE CARDS IN THE CLASSROOM These cards are a log of the tools and technologies stu- dents learned about on STE(A) M Truck. Cut them out and use them as a reference for your classroom. WHAT’S ON THE CARDS? Each card includes one or two facts about how the tool works, and, in some cases the history of how the tool came about. A price range of the tool is also provided. CODE Sometimes color codes and categories can make learning easier. Here are a few groups we used to sort the tools; feel free to add your own! = tools that measure = tools that cut = tools that connect = rapid prototyping tools = electronics tools TOOLS OF THE DAY PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT jigsaw • straightandcurvedcuts • cutssolidwood,ply- wood,plastic,metal, ceramic • cost$25-$200 level • alsocalledabubble levelorspiritlevel • indicatewhetherasur- faceishorizontal(level) orvertical(plumb) • cost$15-$100 multimeter • measurevoltage(in volts),resistance,and current • cost$10-$150 pliers • usedtohold,bendor compress • comprisedoftwohan- dles&twojawsthat maycrimp,pinchorcut • cost$3-$30 mitersaw • accuratecrosscuts(the shortendoflongstock) • longripcutsnotpossible • typicallyusedforwood exclusively • cost$200-$600 drillpress • usedforboringholes • setofhandlesrotatedto lowerdrillbitintopiece • cutswood,metal,plas- tics • cost$150-$600 Fold along the dotted lines to make a folder to hold your cards in!
  13. 13. 25STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK24 TOOLO F T H E DAY Which tools and technologies would you like to see in your class- room? What might you make with them? What tools did you see on the STE(A)M Truck/Trailer for which there is no Tool Card? Which did you not see on STE(A)M Truck/ Trailer? CRITICAL THINKING AS A CLASS FRONT BACK INSIDE POCKET PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  14. 14. 27STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK26 W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY WORDS OF THE DAY WORDS OF THE DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  15. 15. 29STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK28 WORDS OF THE DAY tinker “Theexperimentversionofdoodling” -MikeStasny reflection Discussthevalueofusingtimeto reflectonthethingsyoulearn.How doesjournalinghelpyouabsorb information? teamwork “Alonewecandosolittle;together wecandosomuch.” -HelenKeller WhymightHelenKellerplacesomuchvaluein collaboration? ideate Explaintheiterativeprocess.Discuss whatcanbelearnedfromtweakinga conceptoverandover. capable “Ifyouthinkyoucandoit,orifyou thinkyoucan’tdoit,youareright.” -HenryFord constructivefeedback Discussandgiveexamplesofcon- structivefeedback.Cancriticismstill beconstructive?Whyisitimportant togetfeedbackonyourwork? prototype Afirstorearlyexamplethatisused asamodelforwhatcomeslater. innovation “Creativityisthinkingupnewthings. Innovationisdoingnewthings.” -TheodoreLevitt communication “Youcanhavebrilliantideas,butif youcan’tgetthemacross,yourideas won’tgetyouanywhere.” -LeeIacocca,automobileexecutive empathy Defineempathyasitpertainstothe designthinkingprocess.Howcan yourownlifeexperiencesmakeyou morecapableofempathy? perserverance “Ifyoucan’tfly,thenrun.Ifyoucan’trun thenwalk.Ifyoucan’twalk,thencrawl. Butwhateveryoudo,youhavetokeep movingforward.” -MartinLuterKing,Jr focus Whatareyourto-do’sfortheday? Giveusateaserofyourprojectand theworkthathasalreadygoneintoit. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  16. 16. 31STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK30 W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY W ORDO F T H E DAY WORDS OF THE DAY PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  17. 17. 33STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK32 ingenuity Discussthesharedrootbetweenthe word“ingenuity”and“genius” gratitude Howdoyoushowgratitudetoyour friends?Yourfamily?Yourteachers andclassmates? designthinking Theprocessofdesigingbycycling throughthesesteps:Empathize,De- fine,Ideate,Prototype,Test HassoPlattner,InstituteofDesignatStanford creativity “Youcan’tuseupcreativity--themore youuse,themoreyouhave.” -MayaAngelou,author,poetand civilrightsactivist implementation “Nolumberjackevertalkedatree intofallingdown.” -Proverb revision “Ayearfromnow,you’llwishyou’d startedtoday.” -KarenLamb,professor&author WORDS OF THE DAY HOW TO: USE THESE CARDS IN THE CLASSROOM These cards are small remind- ers of the words STE(A)M Truck uses to spark meaningful discussion and critical thought. Cut them out and use them in your classroom to keep the conversations going! WHAT’S ON THE CARDS? Each card includes either a concept, definition, quote, or discussion prompt on it. In some cases, it may include some combination of these! COLOR CODE Sometimes color codes and categories can make learning easier. Here are a few groups we used to sort the words; feel free to add your own! = concept = definition = quote = discussion prompt PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT Fold along the dotted lines to make a folder to hold your cards in!
  18. 18. 35STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK34 W ORDO F T H E DAY Which words of the day resonate with your classroom rather than being STE(A)M Truck-specific? Why? Invent some Words of the Day for your classroom, and assign each one a quote, definition, or discussion prompt. CRITICAL THINKING AS A CLASS FRONT BACK INSIDE POCKET PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  19. 19. 37STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK36 STEAM TRUNKS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Cork Ball Float This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: This activity has the students attempt to make a cork ball float in the Wind Tube. They will try different iterations of their design, working from sketches through to prototypes until they are successful. Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes Approximate Duration: 30 minutes Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math should be able to complete the challenge without much guid- ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal- lenge and provide scaffolding where needed. Once students are ready to test their design, ensure that they are wearing safety glasses and allow them to place their creation in the wind tube. If it floats they were successful. If it doesn’t, have them consider why not and make some adjust- ments. Assessment Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal- lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af- terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding. Possible discussion questions: RESOURCES Equipment/Materials Wind Tube, cork ball, scissors, tape, paper and pencils, and an assortment of craft supplies such as piece of fabric, tooth- picks and straws. Table option- al. Safety Plan & Mitigations Electronics should not be used near water. Not to be done outside if it is raining. There are moving parts involved in this activity. Students should wear safety glasses when working with the Wind Tube. How did their drawings and ideas about pre-existing float- ing objects inform their design? What designs really worked well. What didn’t? Why do they think that is? Did they collaborate with any of their peers, what did they learn from that experience? What can they explain about what is necessary to make an object float? What real world applications can this knowledge have? Clean Up Have students throw out or keep their drawings and return their cork ball and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pag- ers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. LEARNING SEQUENCE Preparation/Setup Set up the Wind Tube and ensure that it works properly. Ensure that extension cords are secured to minimize the trip hazard. In each STE(A)M Trunk place a cork ball, scissors and an assortment of craft supplies such as piece of fabric, straws, and tape. Also include a piece of paper, a pencil, and a one-pager. Guidance During Session Welcome students to the STE(A) M Truck. If they’ve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de- scription of what they’re about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri- ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager. STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students LEARNING SEQUENCE Common Core/Georgia Performance Standard(s) S4P3. Students will demon- strate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demonstrate the effect of grav- itational force on the motion of an object. Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c) other content areas. Students are given a hands-on experience with aerodynamics and the movement of air. This can help them begin to under- stand the physics of flight and other practical applications for aerodynamicy. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  20. 20. 39STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK38 PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT TAKEAWAYS S T E ( A ) M T R U N K C H A L L E N G E Cork Ball Float OBJECTIVE: Make a cork ball float in the wind tube. REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your design more steady? Can you make it do tricks (spin, flip, etc.)? JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal. 2 BUILD IT Buildyourdesign. Don’tbeafraidto iterate(change)as youbuild. 1 DESIGN IT Comeupwith a plan.Checkout yourmaterials.How couldyoucombine themtomakethe corkballfloatinthe windtube? 3 TEST IT Placeyourcreation inthewindtube. Doesitfloat?Ifso, congratulations!If not,whynot?Tweak yourdesignand retry! TAKEAWAYS S T E ( A ) M T R U N K C H A L L E N G E High Rise OBJECTIVE: Design a tower out of newspaper that is as tall as your forearm, can support a tennis ball, and also withstand wind force. REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your tower hold more weight or more windforce? JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal. 2 BUILD IT Usingyourplan, buildyourtower. Don’tbeafraidto iterate(change)as youbuild. 1 DESIGN IT Comeupwith aplan foryourtower.Think abouthowyouwill useyournewspaper (roll,fold,stack, etc.).Whichshapes willyouuseinyour design?Whichshapes arestrongest? 3 TEST IT Withthetennis ballinposition,put yourtowerinfront ofthefan.Doesit withstandtheforce?If so,congratulations!If not,whynot?Tweak thedesignandretryit.
  21. 21. 41STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK40 STEAM TRUNKS OVERVIEW Name of Project: High Rise This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a tower at least 18” tall that can support a tennis ball on top and withstand wind force. They will use newspaper and masking tape for the build. Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes Approximate Setup Time: 15 minutes Approximate Duration: 30 minutes Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math RESOURCES Equipment/Materials Newspaper, tennis ball, mask- ing tape, tabletop fan Safety Plan & Mitigations Electronics should not be used near water. Fan should not be used if it is raining. LEARNING SEQUENCE Preparation/Setup Place a predetermined amount of newspaper, masking tape, a tennis ball, a paper, a pencil, and the one-pager in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks. Set up a fan to provide wind force. Guidance During Session Welcome students to the STE(A) M Truck. If they’ve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de- scription of what they’re about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri- ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager. STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid- ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal- lenge and provide scaffolding where needed. Assessment Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal- lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af- terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding. Possible discussion questions: How did your final design differ from your sketch? What was the strongest way to manipulate the paper (folding, rolling, stacking, etc.)? How did the wind affect your tower? If you could have one more ma- terial for this build, what would it be and why? Clean Up Have students throw out or keep their newspaper, towers, and drawings. Have them return the masking tape, tennis ball, and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. LEARNING SEQUENCE Georgia Performance Standard(s) S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob- jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction. S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon- strate the effect of gravitation- al force on the motion of an object. Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c) other content areas. Students are given the oppor- tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  22. 22. 43STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK42 STEAM TRUNKS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Cup Float Jellyfish This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: This activity has the students attempt to make a cup float in the Wind Tube with the added requirement that it have tassels like a jellyfish. It is slight- ly more challenging than the Cup Float as the tassels may af- fect the movement of the object. They will try different iterations of their design, working from sketches through to prototypes until they are successful. Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes Approximate Duration: 30 minutes Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math RESOURCES Equipment/Materials Wind Tube, Styrofoam cup, pieces of fabric, straws, tape, pipe cleaners, string, scissors, drawing paper, pencils. Table optional. Safety Plan & Mitigations Electronics should not be used near water. Not to be done outside if it is raining. There are moving parts involved in this activity. Students should wear safety glasses when working with the Wind Tube. LEARNING SEQUENCE Preparation/Setup Set up the Wind Tube and en- sure that it works properly. Ensure that extension cords are secured to minimize the trip hazard. In each STE(A)M Trunk place a Styrofoam cup, string, scis- sors, and an assortment of craft supplies such as piece of fabric, straws, and tape. Also include a piece of paper, a pencil, and a one-pager. Lock the STE(A)M Trunks. Guidance During Session Welcome students to the STE(A) M Truck. If they’ve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de- scription of what they’re about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri- ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager. STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid- ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal- lenge and provide scaffolding where needed. Once students are ready to test their design, ensure they are wearing safety glasses and let them place their creation in the Wind Tube. If it floats (and vaguely resembles a jellyfish), they were successful. If not, have them consider why not and make some adjustments to their design. Assessment Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal- lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af- terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their un- derstanding. Possible discussion questions: How did their drawings and ideas about pre-existing float- ing objects inform their design? If the students had previously done the Cup Float Challenge, how did their knowledge of that activity inform how they ap- proached this one? Which designs worked well? Which didn’t? Why do they think that is? How did the addition of the extra materials affect the effec- tiveness of their design? Did they collaborate with any of their peers, what did they learn from that experience? What can they explain about what is necessary to make an object float? Clean Up Have students throw out or keep their drawings and return their cup and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. LEARNING SEQUENCE Common Core/Georgia Performance Standard(s) S4P3. Students will demon- strate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demonstrate the effect of grav- itational force on the motion of an object. Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c) other content areas. Students are given a hands-on experience with aerodynamics and the movement of air. This can help them begin to under- stand the physics of flight and other practical applications for aerodynamicy. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  23. 23. 45STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK44 PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT TAKEAWAYS S T E ( A ) M T R U N K C H A L L E N G E Floating Cup Jellyfish OBJECTIVE: Design and build a floating ‘jelly- fish’ using the materials provided. REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your ‘jellyfish’ more steady? Can you make it do tricks (spin, flip, etc.)? JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal. 2 BUILD IT Buildyour prototype. Don’t beafraidtoiterate (change)asyou build. 1 DESIGN IT Checkoutyoursup- plies.Howcouldyou putthemtogetherin awaythatwillfloat inthewindtubeand looklikeajellyfish? 3 TEST IT Placeyour‘jellyfish’ inthewindtube. Doesitfloat?Ifso, congratulations!If not,whynot?Try anotherdesign! TAKEAWAYS S T E ( A ) M T R U N K C H A L L E N G E Watercraft OBJECTIVE: Design a craft that can float on wa- ter and hold at least 1 lb without sinking. REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your craft hold more weight? JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal. 2 BUILD IT Buildyourwatercraft. Don’tbeafraidto iterate(change)as youbuild. 1 DESIGN IT Checkoutyour materials.Consider howyoucanput themtogether tobuildacraft. Rememberthatthe height,width,and shapecanaffecthow wellitfloats. 3 TEST IT Giveitatry!Place yourwatercraftin thewaterandtestits buoyancy(‘floatabil- ity’).Diditwork?If so,congratulations! Ifnot,whynot? Canyoutweakitto improvethedesign?
  24. 24. 47STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK46 STEAM TRUNKS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Watercraft This challenge is best suited for grades: 6-8 Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a watercraft that can sup- port at least a pound of weight. They will use only provided materials for the build. Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes Approximate Setup Time: 15 minutes Approximate Duration: 30 minutes Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math RESOURCES Equipment/Materials A few tubs full of water, class- room materials of your choos- ing , a one pound weight, paper, and a pencil Safety Plan & Mitigations Keep all electronics away from the water. LEARNING SEQUENCE Preparation/Setup Place the classroom materials of your choosing , a paper, a pencil, and the one-pager in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks. Fill the tubs with water. No need to over fill them; they just need enough to allow their crafts to float. Guidance During Session Welcome students to the STE(A) M Truck. If they’ve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de- scription of what they’re about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri- ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager. STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid- ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal- lenge and provide scaffolding where needed. Once students have completed their craft and are ready to test it out, allow them to carefully place their craft on the water. If it floats on its own they can add the weight. If it floats they were successful. If it doesn’t, and if there’s time, encourage them to assess what they could do dif- ferently and make adjustments. Assessment Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal- lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af- terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding. Possible discussion questions: How did your final design differ from your sketch? What was one technique that really helped your design? Why do you think it worked so well? Or didn’t work so well? Clean Up Have students throw out or keep their watercraft. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. Dump out the water and if you are indoors, dry up any spilled water. LEARNING SEQUENCE Georgia Performance Standard(s) S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob- jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction. S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon- strate the effect of gravitation- al force on the motion of an object. Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c) other content areas. Students are given the oppor- tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  25. 25. 49STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK48 STEAM TRUNKS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Straw Bridge This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a bridge that can span 12” and support a half pound of weight. They will use drinking straws and scotch tape. Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes Approximate Duration: 30 minutes Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math RESOURCES Equipment/Materials A table, 20 straws per trunk, scotch tape, scissors, a half pound weight, a paper, and a pencil, two cinder blocks (or anything similar) for the bridge to span. Safety Plan & Mitigations Follow standard safe practice for using scissors.. LEARNING SEQUENCE Preparation/Setup Place 20 straws, a roll of scotch tape, a pair of scissors, a pa- per, a pencil, and the one-pag- er in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks. Set up a table with two cinder blocks on top, 12” apart. Their bridges will span this gap. Guidance During Session Welcome students to the STE(A) M Truck. If they’ve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de- scription of what they’re about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri- ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager. STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid- ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal- lenge and provide scaffolding where needed. Once students have bridges ready to test, have them place their bridge spanning the gap between the cinder blocks. Allow them to slowly place the weight on their bridge. If the bridge doesn’t collapse they were successful. If it does collapse, and if they have time, encourage them to consider what went wrong and find a solution. Assessment Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal- lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af- terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding. Possible discussion questions: How did your final design differ from your sketch? What was one technique that really helped your design? Why do you think it worked so well? Or didn’t work so well? Look at some of the other designs people came up with. Consider some of the types of bridges that you’ve seen. How could you have built yours differently? What shapes did you use in your design? Which shapes do you think are strongest? Squares? Rectangles? Trian- gles? Circles? Clean Up Have students throw out or keep their bridges and draw- ings. Have them return any straws and tape to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. LEARNING SEQUENCE Georgia Performance Standard(s) S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob- jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction. S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon- strate the effect of gravitation- al force on the motion of an object. Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c) other content areas. Students are given the oppor- tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  26. 26. 51STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK50 PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT TAKEAWAYS S T E ( A ) M T R U N K C H A L L E N G E Leaning Tower of Pasta OBJECTIVE: Design a tower at least 6” high that can support a textbook. REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your tower strong enough to support two textbooks? JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal. 2 BUILD IT Buildyourtower. Considerwhich shapesyou’reusingin yourdesign.Which shapesarestrongest? 1 DESIGN IT Checkoutyoursup- plies.Howcouldyou putthemtogetherin awaythatwillbeat least6incheshigh(a littleshorterthana pen)andsupporta textbook? 3 TEST IT Testyourtowerby carefullyplacinga textbookontop.Did itwork?Ifso,con- gratulations!Ifnot, whynot?Canyou tweakittoimprove thedesign? TAKEAWAYS S T E ( A ) M T R U N K C H A L L E N G E Straw Bridge OBJECTIVE: Design and build a bridge that can support a tennis ball. REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your bridge span a longer dis- tance or hold more weight? JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal. 2 BUILD IT Buildyourbridge. Don’tbeafraidto iterate(change)as youbuild. 1 DESIGN IT Comeupwith a planforyourbridge. Thinkaboutwhich shapesyouwilluse. Whichshapesare strongest?Don’t forgettodesigna spotfortheball. 3 TEST IT Withthetennisball inplace,putyour bridgeinposition. Doesitwithstandthe weightoftheball?If so,congratulations! Ifnot,whynot? Tweakthedesign andretry.
  27. 27. 53STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK52 STEAM TRUNKS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Leaning Tower of Pasta This challenge is best suited for grades: 6-8 Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a tower at least 6” tall that can support a textbook. They will use only spaghetti and marshmallows for the build. Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes Approximate Duration: 30 minutes Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math RESOURCES Equipment/Materials A table, spaghetti, marshmal- lows, small textbook, a paper, and a pencil Safety Plan & Mitigations For sanitary reasons, encour- age students not to eat the materials. LEARNING SEQUENCE Preparation/Setup Place a predetermined amount of spaghetti and marshmallows, a paper, a pencil, and the one-pager in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks. Set up a table for the students to work on. Guidance During Session Welcome students to the STE(A) M Truck. If they’ve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de- scription of what they’re about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri- ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager. STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid- ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal- lenge and provide scaffolding where needed. Once students have built their tower and are ready to test, allow them to slowly place the textbook on top. If it supports the book they were successful. If not, have them consider why not and make adjustments (if possible). Assessment Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal- lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af- terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding. Possible discussion questions: How did your final design differ from your sketch? What was one technique that really helped your design? Why do you think it worked so well? Or didn’t work so well? If you could have one more ma- terial for this build, what would it be and why? Clean Up Have students throw out or keep their towers, and draw- ings. Have them return any unused spaghetti and marsh- mallows, the testbook, and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. LEARNING SEQUENCE Georgia Performance Standard(s) S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob- jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction. S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon- strate the effect of gravitation- al force on the motion of an object. Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c) other content areas. Students are given the oppor- tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom. PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT
  28. 28. 55STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK54 LEARNINGSEQUENCE GeorgiaPerformanceStan- dard(s) VA8PR,1(d)Usestoolsandmateri- alswithcraftsmanship(e.g.withcare inasafeandappropriatemanner). VA8C,1(a)Makesconnectionsto othersubjectsthathelpexpandart knowledgeand/orskills. VA8C,2(b)Integratesinformation andskillsfromartintoothersubject areastosupportpersonallearning- VA8MC.1Engagesinthecreative processtogenerateandvisualize ideas. VA8MC.2Identifiesandworksto solvesproblemsthroughauthentic engagement(thinking,planning,and experimenting)withartmethodsand materials,exploringthenatureof creativity. STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS RESOURCES Day 1 (Name Tag) Safety Plan: Safety gog- gles when CNC is running, proper protocol for using hot glue guns. Materials and Resources: • CNC mill • 3D printer • plywood • hot glue gun • one magnetic name tag backing per person • sanding blocks Day 2 (Journal) Safety Plan: Relatively low- risk day Materials and Resources: • laser cutter • chipboard (2 sheets per student) • three-hole punched, lined paper (20 per student) • any additional papers necessary • brads (3 per student) • clamps PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT RESOURCES Day 1 Key Goals for the Day: Students will have their own name tags for use for the remainder of the program. • Prior to lesson, precut the name tags for each student. Allow 3-5 minutes per name. • (6 min) Introduce the 3D Printer video and the CNC video, show to students and have a brief discussion. • Instructors pass out the pre-cut Name Tags • Split Group 1 into two Groups: Group 1A and Group 1B (5 min) Students are brought to the CNC Router where they are shown how it works. • (5 min) Students are shown how to properly sand using a sanding block and then sand their name tags. • (5 min) Students are given the opportunity to color their Name Tags using Paint Pens. • Prior to lesson, precut the journal covers for each student. Allow 1-2 minutes per cover. • (5min)StudentsarebroughttotheLaserCutter.MakerMentor leadsadiscussionaboutmakers’priorknowledge/experience withlasers.LeadintoLaserCuttervideo.MakerMentorcontinues discussion,referencingAdditivevs.SubtractiveManufacturing. Similarities/differencestoahouseholdprintercouldbediscussed. • Scorethebacksideofthefrontcoverontheseamside,1”infrom theedge.Foldthescore. • Holdthefrontandbackcoveralignedanddrilltheholes.Usea pieceofwoodbelowsoastonotdrillthroughthetable. • Assemblejournalwithcoverssandwhiching allsheetsofpaper. Day 2 Key Goals for the Day: Students will have their own journals. OVERVIEW Name of Project: CNC Name Tags & Laser Cut Journals This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: Students will learn about rapid prototyping tech- nologies Deliverable: A name tag and journal that will be used by the student for the remainder of the engagement. STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math ASSESSMENT Use a rubric to assess a stu- dents’ competencies in the following categories: • Student is able to describe the distinction between additive and subtractive manufacturing techniques • Student can explain the pro- cess of CNC milling, laserc cutting, and 3D printing. • Student can explain the process of assembling their journal and name tag effec- tively and clearly.
  29. 29. 57STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK56 STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Bridge Build This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: Students will work together to build the strongest cardboard bridge that spans a kiddie pool. Deliverable: A bridge made of cardboard that students can use to walk across a short span. STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math ASSESSMENT Use a rubric to assess a stu- dents’ competencies in the following categories: • Student is aware of motives and feelings of other peo- ple and oneself; including the ability to reason within large and small groups. • Student is able to find solu- tions during conflicts with others • Student knows when and how to include others , and allows others to speak without interruption RESOURCES Day 1 Safety Plan: Guide will give reminder to be careful with scissors, but expects that students have previously learned safety with scissors. Materials and Resources: • Small whiteboards (1 per team) • Scissors (1 per team) • Pencils (5 per team) • 2x4’s • Bricks/blocks • Cards • Paper (spans) Day 2 Safety Plan: Guide will review safety procedures with students on using glove with knives and glue guns, and wearing goggles with drill. Materials and Resources: • Scissors (1 per team) • Xacto knives (1 per team) • Glue guns (6) • Hand drill (1 per team) • Safety gloves and gog- gles (3 per team) • Small whiteboards (1 per team) PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT RESOURCES Day 1 Key Goals for the Day: Students will forge an understanding about bridge design, construction, and teamwork. • (5 min) Group leaders will initiate a conversation with stu- dents about traveling on bridge or bridge they have seen on TV. Show video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7uc- 3Mqe4_c (start at sec 25) • (3 min) Maker mentor will introduce project and explain that today will focus on a prototype and testing different bridge structures: truss and beam, straw bridge, paper triangles, K’nex. • (5 min) Students will reflect as a group about what they learned about bridge design, construction, and teamwork. Create individual sketches of bridges in journals. • (5 min) Maker mentors will help students review information discussed in the previous day. Students will have opportunity to share the sketches they created in the closing activity of previous day. • Tinker (10 min) Students will manipulate cardboard pieces to create small structures. Student will note how they are able to reinforce and shape the pieces. • Design (10 min) Groups will revisit the notes they took with previous builds and together, students will combine their ideas into the one they’ll build. • Build (25 min) Students will divide work among students to construct bridge, test & refine, then test over kiddie pool. Day 2 Key Goals for the Day: Students will have constructed the bridge. LEARNINGSEQUENCE GeorgiaPerformanceStan- dard(s) SCSh3. Studentswillidentify andinvestigateproblems scientifically. Suggestreasonablehypothesesfor identifiedproblems. Developproceduresforsolving scientificproblems. SPS8.Studentswilldetermine relationshipsamongforce, mass,andmotion. Calculatevelocityandacceleration. ApplyNewton’sthreelawsto everydaysituationsbyexplainingthe following: Explainthedifferenceinmassand weight. Calculateamountsofworkand mechanicaladvantageusingsimple machines.
  30. 30. 59STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK58 LEARNINGSEQUENCE GeorgiaPerformanceStan- dard(s) NationalStandard6The studentmakesconnectionstoother disciplinesandtheworldthrough thevisualarts.Thestudentdevelops creativity,critical-thinking,perceptual awareness,andproblem-solving skills.Thestudentconsidersessential questionsofart,engagesinaesthetic dialogue,andmakeseffortstocon- structmeaninginthestudyofart. VA6MC.1-VA8C.1Applies informationfromotherdisciplines toenhancetheunderstandingand productionofartworks. a.Makesconnectionstoothersub- jectsthathelpexpandartknowledge and/orskills.Engagesinthecreative processtogenerateandvisualize ideas. VA6PR.1Understandsandapplies media,techniques,andprocesses. M6P4Studentswillmakeconnec- tionsamongmathematicalideasand tootherdisciplines. NationalStandard1Useinput technologiesappropriatelytoenter andmanipulatetextanddata. STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS RESOURCES Day 1 Safety Plan: Relatively low- risk day. Materials and Resources: • iPads • Boxes of Lego • Various clamps • White board with markers Day 2 Safety Plan: Relatively low- risk day Materials and Resources: • iPads • Boxes of Lego • Various clamps PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT RESOURCES Day 1 Key Goals for the Day: Create a whiteboard stop motion ani- mation as a group. Plan lego stop motion animations for Day 2. • (15 min) Ahead of time, have a white board rigged to a wall or fence. Set up an iPad on a tripod facing the sheet. The students will complete a collaborative line drawing that will become a stop motion animation. • Use the Lego Stop Motion app. • Students will take turns drawing. Each mark is built upon previous maker’s mark and must connect. Each maker will be given no more than 10 seconds to draw and then step away. An image will be snapped in the app, next maker goes. Repeat process until complete. • (15 min) Students will watch and critique finished video live and manipulate speed in the app. • (5 min) Show class a stop motion clip (Lego movie, etc). • Reminder of how image motion in film/video is at a rate of about 30 frames per second. How our eyes make motion from a series of still images. • (10 min) Using their plans from the previous day, have stu- dents make any characters or props required for their video. • (40 min) The students will work in small groups to create their animations. • Showcase of all final projects and class-wide discussion • Debrief on what went well, what did not go well. • What math skills were used to accomplish the task? • Be sure to document day’s progress! Day 2 Key Goals for the Day: Film a short stop motion lego animation. OVERVIEW Name of Project: Stop Mo- tion This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8 Overview: Students will work together to create stop motion animations. Deliverable: A short stop mo- tion video. STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math ASSESSMENT Use a rubric to assess a stu- dents’ competencies in the following categories: • Student works effectively with teammates • Student is able to explain what stop motion animation is and how it works • Student is able to produce a smooth animation
  31. 31. 61STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK60 PLAYBOOKCHAPTER3:MAKERKIT STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS OVERVIEW Name of Project: Make a Tes- sellation Mural This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-5 Overview: Students will learn about tessellating art, and cre- ate a large-scale mural of their own design. Deliverable: A mural that can be left behind as a wall piece for the school. STEAM Focus: Science, Tech- nology, Engineering, Art, and Math ASSESSMENT Use a rubric to assess a stu- dents’ competencies in the following categories: • Student is able to describe the assembly of a tessellat- ing image • Student understands frac- tions as one part broken down into x amount of sections. • Student is able to draw,la- bel, and recreate 2D and 3D shapes. RESOURCES Day 1 Safety Plan: Relatively low- risk day Materials and Resources: • whiteboard + Expo markers • ruler • heavy construction paper, cut to square • pencils • tape (masking) • scissors RESOURCES Day 1 Key Goals for the Day: Students will have their own tessellat- ing tile created and a color scheme for their mural selected. • Startingwiththewholeclass,ProjectLeader showsimageryoftessellatingart,ie,theartof MCEscher. • (20min)Studentswillfollowthestep-by-step process(shownleft)toconstructtheirown tessellationoutofheavyconstructionpaper. (Instructormayconsidermountingtessella- tionsontofoamcoreorcardboardtomake themeasiertotracelater,andmoreduable. Startwithlargesquares(8.5”x8.5”) • Studentswillthenselectcolorschemesfor theirrespectivepartsofthemural,andconsid- erhowthelargermuralwillcometogether. • Besuretodocumentday’sprogress! • Asawholegroup,briefreviewofprojectplanfortheday. • Briefdiscussionontimeparameterstoaccomplishtask • Mountlargestock/butcherpapertowall(orspreadoutonthe groundifnecessary) • Studentswilltracetheirtessellatingimagesonthelargepiece. • Setupvideocameratorecord. Onestudenttitled“documentari- an”willassisttheinstructorinsettingupthecameraandframingit, thenwillbetaskedwithcheckingitperiodicallytoensurethatitisstill capturingfootage. • Paint/colortessellatingimagestocompletethemural. • Showcaseofallfinalprojectsandclass-widediscussion Day 2 Safety Plan: Relatively low- risk day Materials and Resources: • whiteboard + Expo markers • completed tessellations from previous day • butcher paper (or thick stock of something, wood, cardboard, etc) • 1 large sheet per class • markers (washable and sharpies) • acrylic paints & brushes Day 2 Key Goals for the Day: Completed tessellating mural! LEARNINGSEQUENCE GeorgiaPerformanceStan- dard(s) MGSE3.OA.9Identifyarithmetic patterns(includingpatternsinthe additiontableormultiplicationtable), andexplainthemusingpropertiesof operations.‡Forexample,observe that4timesanumberisalwayseven, andexplainwhy4timesanumber canbedecomposedintotwoequal addends. MGSE3.NF.1Understandafrac- tion1/basthequantityformedby1 partwhenawholeispartitionedinto bequalparts(unitfraction);under- standafactionabasthequantity formedbyapartsofsize1/b.For example,3/4meanstherearethree 1/4parts,so3/4=1/4+1/4+ 1/4. MGSE3.NF.2Understanda fractionasanumberonthenumber line;representfractionsonanumber linediagram. MGSE3.NF.3Explainequivalence offractionsthroughreasoningwith visualfractionmodels.Comparefrac- tionsbyreasoningabouttheirsize.a. Understandtwofractionsasequiva- lent(equal)iftheyarethesamesize, orthesamepointonanumberline.
  32. 32. 63STEAMTRUCK.ORG "What we are learning from STE(A)M Truck is how to teach the creative thinking behind the science. Schools need to be as engaging as the STE(A)M Truck." GILBERTE PASCAL THE KINDEZI SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 3D printer a type of industrial robot which creates objects by laying successive layers of material under computer control to create an object. These objects can be of almost any shape or geometry and are produced from a 3D model or other electronic data source. additive manufacturing describes the technologies that build 3D objects by adding layer-upon-layer of material, whether the material is plastic, metal, concrete, and even food. Common to AM technologies is the use of a computer, 3D modeling software (Computer Aided Design or CAD), machine equipment and layering material. computational thinking a problem solving process that includes (but is not limited to) the following characteristics • Formulating problems in a way the enables us to use a computer and other tools • to help solve them. • Logically organizing and analyzing data • Representing data through abstractions such as models and simulations • Automating solutions through algorithmic thinking • Identifying, analyzing, and implementing possible solutions with the goal of • achieving the most efficient and effective combination of steps and resources CNC mill CNC, or Computer Numerical Control, refers to the automation of machine tools that are operated by precisely programmed commands encoded on a storage medium, as opposed to controlled manually by hand wheels or levers, or mechanically automated by cams alone. A CNC mill computer controls the process of milling -- removing layers from the surface of a flat piece of material. CNC milling is a type of subtractive manufacturing. design thinking design-specific cognitive activities that designers apply during the process of designing. Consists of the following steps, which can be repeated, and are nonlinear: • empathize • define • ideate • prototype • test iterative design process a design methodology based on a cyclic process of prototyping, testing, analyzing, and refining a product or process. Based on the results of testing the most recent iteration of a design, changes and refinements are made. laser cutter a technology that uses a laser to cut materials. The focused laser beam is directed at the material, which then either melts, burns, vaporizes away, or is blown away by a jet of gas,[1] leaving an edge with a high- quality surface finish. Laser cutting is a type of subtractive manufacturing. maker-mentors STE(A)M Truck’s full time educators with maker or technical backgrounds. maker movement a contemporary culture or subculture representing a technology-based extension of DIY culture, which often includes engineering-oriented pursuits such as electronics, GLOSSARY
  33. 33. 65STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK64 robotics, 3-D printing, and the use of CNC tools, as well as more traditional activities such as metalworking, woodworking, and, mainly, its predecessor, the traditional arts and crafts makerspace a community-operated workspace where people with common interests, often in computers, machining, technology, science, digital art or electronic art, can meet, socialize and collaborate. metacognition defined as “cognition about cognition”, or “knowing about knowing.” It can take many forms; it includes knowledge about when and how to use particular strategies for learning or for problem solving. model a visual, mathematical, or three- dimensional representation in detail of an object or design, often smaller than the original. A model is often used to test ideas, make changes to a design, and to learn more about what would happen to a similar, real object. response to intervention a multi-tier approach to the early identification and support of students with learning and behavior needs. spatial thinking a cognitive skill that can be used to structure problems, find answer, and express solutions using the properties of space. STE(A)M an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math, this is an approach to teaching and learning that integrates the content and skills of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. STEM Standards of Practice guide STEM instruction by defining the combination of behaviors, integrated with STEM content, which is expected of a proficient STEM student. These behaviors include engagement in inquiry, logical reasoning, collaboration, and investigation. STE(A)M Trunks STE(A)M Truck’s hands-on energizer kits, these are self- contained activities that are able to fit inside of a trunk a little smaller than a shoe box, with a combination lock. subtractive manufacturing any of various processes in which a piece of raw material is cut into a desired final transdisciplinary the transdisciplinary approach to integration, teachers organize curriculum around student questions and concerns. Students develop life skills as they apply interdisciplinary and disciplinary skills in a real-life context. Two routes lead to transdisciplinary integration- project-based learning and negotiating the curriculum. RESOURCES Still can’t get enough? Try these websites and resources for more information on Mak- ing and STE(A)M. • makered.org • makezine.com • slomakerspace.com • sparktruck.org • www.startcode.net • steamtruck.org • stemtosteam.org • theconnectory.org PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS
  34. 34. Community Guilds c/o Center of Civic Innovation Third Floor 115 M.L.K. Jr Dr NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 steamtruck.org Playbook by Sarah Lashinsky, 2016

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