EyeTrack: Tablet ResearchTHE POYNTER INSTITUTE FOR MEDIA STUDIES#poyntertab
How do peoplechoose what toread on a tablet?
And how do they read,once they choose?
We asked them.
We asked them.
We watched them.
And we looked closelyat how they interactedwith the stories.
THE PEOPLE:We tested 36 people who had each useda tablet for at least six months.     Female   52%     48%      Male
THE PEOPLE:We tested two, distinct age groups.18-28 years    48%      52%       45-55 years
THE PEOPLE:   We tested two, distinct age groups.“Digital Natives”                  “Printnets”   18-28 years      48%    ...
THE PEOPLE:   We tested two, distinct age groups.“Digital Natives”                      “Printnets”   18-28 years         ...
THE TESTING PROTOCOL:Testing was done at Poynter last summer.Participants were invited in for a 90 minute session.We did n...
THE TESTING PROTOCOL:The eyetracking glasses contained two smallcameras — one that recorded eye movementand another that r...
THE TESTING PROTOCOL:We standardized experience to limit variables.We used one kind of tablet—a full-sized iPad—presented ...
THE TESTING PROTOCOL:We asked them to read oneof these publications first.
THE TESTING PROTOCOL:Then we gave them one of three prototypehome pages.
THE TESTING PROTOCOL:Three different entryway designs that led to the sametwenty stories.
Our home page designs were inspired by commonnavigation styles currently in the news market.
THE PROTOTYPES:Traditional, INSPIRED BY THE BOSTON GLOBE and THE NEW YORK TIMES
THE PROTOTYPES:Carousel, INSPIRED BY NPR and PULSE
THE PROTOTYPES:Tile, INSPIRED BY FLIPBOARD
Traditional   Carousel   Tile
Traditional   Carousel   Tile
We wanted to compare how people chose a story.Traditional        Carousel          Tile
We wanted to compare how people chose a story.Traditional           Carousel       TileThere was one,unified design forall...
We wanted to compare how people chose a story.Traditional           Carousel       TileThere was one,                     ...
The stories and formsOur designs were rather simple—created as a baseline for research.
TEXT WITH A STILL PHOTO
TEXT WITH A STILL GRAPHIC                        A Lost Secret: The once and future way to run
TEXT WITH A PHOTO GALLERY
PHOTO GALLERY
PHOTO GALLERY
TEXT WITH A VIDEO
VIDEO
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
POP-UP GRAPHICS
THE STORIES:       There were twenty stories. Each story included a       text narrative, plus one of these elements:     ...
THE STORIES:       There were five still photos.                 NEWS                   BUSINESS              SPORTS      ...
THE STORIES:       There were five still graphics.                 NEWS                   BUSINESS              SPORTS    ...
THE STORIES:       There were five photo galleries.                 NEWS                   BUSINESS              SPORTS   ...
THE STORIES:       There were five videos.                 NEWS                   BUSINESS              SPORTS            ...
THE STORIES:       There were five pop-up graphics.                 NEWS                   BUSINESS              SPORTS   ...
Each home page designs featuredthe same twenty stories.
FINDINGSThis is how people chose.
THE PEOPLE:More people expressed a preference for usinga tablet in a horizontal or landscape orientation.                 ...
THE PROTOTYPES:83 percent said the traditional prototype wasmost similar to what they regularly use.                      ...
THE PROTOTYPES:50 percent said they would choosethe carousel design.                                    Carousel      Trad...
THE PROTOTYPES:Comments about the tile design:“It’s tidier. I can get through it to save time.”BUT OTHERS SAID ...“It make...
THE PROTOTYPES:Comments about the traditional design:“I like hierarchy.”“I am big on written context. That’s just me. The ...
THE PROTOTYPES:The carousel was the favorite, but it also drew themost intense reactions, both pro and con.               ...
THE PROTOTYPES:People who liked the carousel design said:“It’s like a food buffet—you know what looks appetizing.”“The car...
THE PROTOTYPES:People who didn’t like the carousel design said:“The carousel might be overwhelming.                       ...
FINDINGSThe behaviors
THE BEHAVIORS:People tended to enter through a dominant element.
THE BEHAVIORS:This echoes earlier EyeTrack findings(and principles of Gestalt).                   X
THE BEHAVIORS:In lieu of a clear dominant element,faces also drew a lot of attention.
THE BEHAVIORS:In lieu of a clear dominant element,faces also drew a lot of attention.
THE BEHAVIORS:In lieu of a clear dominant element,faces also drew a lot of attention.
THE BEHAVIORS:People fixated an average of 18 timesbefore choosing their first story.             XX           XX         ...
THE BEHAVIORS:This was likely a way for them to narrowdown their story choice.             XX           XX          XX    ...
THE BEHAVIORS:And …
THE BEHAVIORS:… People who did not finish reading their first storyfixated only nine times before choosing.               ...
THE BEHAVIORS:An overall average of a minute and a half(98.3 seconds) was spent on the first storya person selected to rea...
THE BEHAVIORS:And it might be a good benchmarkfor establishing a “gold coin” to keepthe reader engaged about halfwaythroug...
THE BEHAVIORS:This could be a simple pullout quote fromsomeone who has yet to appear in the story.Or, an informative visua...
THE BEHAVIORS:67 percent used native controls, like the back buttonto get to their second story.
THE BEHAVIORS:… even though nav tools were built in.
THE BEHAVIORS:… even though nav tools were built in.People will default to what they know—if it’s available.
THE BEHAVIORS:Many magazines are set up for readers to swipehorizontally from one story topic to another …
THE BEHAVIORS:And vertical scrolls are often used to godeeper into the same story topic …
THE BEHAVIORS:But we found that readers instinctively swipehorizontally through a photo gallery …
THE BEHAVIORS:… even though photos in a galleryare part of the “same story topic.”
THE BEHAVIORS:People swiped horizontally, regardless of orientation.
THE BEHAVIORS:Few people used thumbnails to progress throughthe gallery. The majority used advance buttons.
FINDINGSThis is how people read.
THE BEHAVIORS:    About half of the people tested read methodically,    while half read in a scanning manner.Methodical re...
THE BEHAVIORS:About half of the people tested read methodically,while half read in a scanning manner.  Printnets          ...
THE BEHAVIORS:But both groups read deeply when theyfound what they wanted.  Printnets                    Digital Natives  ...
THE BEHAVIORS:This goes counter to the assumptionthat young people don’t read.  Printnets                    Digital Nativ...
THE BEHAVIORS:  61 percent of readers touched the screen frequently.  Others were more hands off.Detached readers         ...
THE BEHAVIORS: 61 percent of readers touched the screen frequently. Others were more hands off.Detached readers   39%   61...
THE BEHAVIORS: INTIMATE READING BEHAVIORIntimate readers use their finger like a teleprompter.
THE BEHAVIORS: INTIMATE READING BEHAVIORAn analog tool helped people keep their place, a digitalversion might have a place...
FINDINGSHere’s why this wasworth your time.
WHAT THEY CHOSE TO READ:Tablet users have a high number offixations before making a selection.
WHAT THEY CHOSE TO READ:Often, they fixate on the same storymultiple times before choosing it.
WHAT THEY CHOSE TO READ:More fixations before a selectionsuggests the user is more likely toread to completion.
HOW THEY READ:80-90 seconds was the critical‘bail out point.’A gold coin could compelreaders to continue.
HOW THEY READ:Younger readers are morelikely to be scanners.Older readers are morelikely to be methodical.Both read deeply...
@saraquinn — squinn@poynter.org@gotoplanb — davestanton.us@gmail.com
Poynter eye track tablet research sxsw
Poynter eye track tablet research sxsw
Poynter eye track tablet research sxsw
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Poynter eye track tablet research sxsw

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This is Poynter EyeTrack Tablet Research, presented at SXSW on Friday, March 8, 2013. Presenters were Sara Quinn, @saraquinn; David Stanton, @gotoplanb; Mario Garcia, @DrMarioGarcia. #poyntertab

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Poynter eye track tablet research sxsw

  1. EyeTrack: Tablet ResearchTHE POYNTER INSTITUTE FOR MEDIA STUDIES#poyntertab
  2. How do peoplechoose what toread on a tablet?
  3. And how do they read,once they choose?
  4. We asked them.
  5. We asked them.
  6. We watched them.
  7. And we looked closelyat how they interactedwith the stories.
  8. THE PEOPLE:We tested 36 people who had each useda tablet for at least six months. Female 52% 48% Male
  9. THE PEOPLE:We tested two, distinct age groups.18-28 years 48% 52% 45-55 years
  10. THE PEOPLE: We tested two, distinct age groups.“Digital Natives” “Printnets” 18-28 years 48% 52% 45-55 years
  11. THE PEOPLE: We tested two, distinct age groups.“Digital Natives” “Printnets” 18-28 years 48% 52% 45-55 years Among the Referring to one first adults who foot in the print don’t have strong world, one foot in recollection of the “’Net” world. life before digital.
  12. THE TESTING PROTOCOL:Testing was done at Poynter last summer.Participants were invited in for a 90 minute session.We did not tell participants how long they were to read.
  13. THE TESTING PROTOCOL:The eyetracking glasses contained two smallcameras — one that recorded eye movementand another that recorded where the reader looked.
  14. THE TESTING PROTOCOL:We standardized experience to limit variables.We used one kind of tablet—a full-sized iPad—presented on a wedge-like pillow.
  15. THE TESTING PROTOCOL:We asked them to read oneof these publications first.
  16. THE TESTING PROTOCOL:Then we gave them one of three prototypehome pages.
  17. THE TESTING PROTOCOL:Three different entryway designs that led to the sametwenty stories.
  18. Our home page designs were inspired by commonnavigation styles currently in the news market.
  19. THE PROTOTYPES:Traditional, INSPIRED BY THE BOSTON GLOBE and THE NEW YORK TIMES
  20. THE PROTOTYPES:Carousel, INSPIRED BY NPR and PULSE
  21. THE PROTOTYPES:Tile, INSPIRED BY FLIPBOARD
  22. Traditional Carousel Tile
  23. Traditional Carousel Tile
  24. We wanted to compare how people chose a story.Traditional Carousel Tile
  25. We wanted to compare how people chose a story.Traditional Carousel TileThere was one,unified design forall of the stories.
  26. We wanted to compare how people chose a story.Traditional Carousel TileThere was one, Once they madeunified design for a choice, weall of the stories. analyzed how they read.
  27. The stories and formsOur designs were rather simple—created as a baseline for research.
  28. TEXT WITH A STILL PHOTO
  29. TEXT WITH A STILL GRAPHIC A Lost Secret: The once and future way to run
  30. TEXT WITH A PHOTO GALLERY
  31. PHOTO GALLERY
  32. PHOTO GALLERY
  33. TEXT WITH A VIDEO
  34. VIDEO
  35. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  36. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  37. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  38. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  39. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  40. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  41. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  42. POP-UP GRAPHICS
  43. THE STORIES: There were twenty stories. Each story included a text narrative, plus one of these elements: NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS LIFE Extra Olympics “Higher Ed” is Leakey: Skepticism Suspect shoots pay for London the a big problem over evolution will Still photo himself after chase subway staff for the NCAA soon be history Belief in global Home prices rise The once and Recommendations Still graphic warming grows around the U.S. future way to run for summer reading A stray bullet, a Nurturing a baby Best sports photos Proud of service, aPhoto gallery world of adjustment and a start-up of the year vet battles PTSD for blind boy How population Graduating into Mariano Rivera’s Dancing cop takes Video grew to 7 billion debt: soaring costs one-of-a-kind, “Travolta Moves” signature pitch to the streets Japan tsunami Which cities have Kobe Bryant vs. Survey shows how Pop-up debris floats closer the competitive Michael Jordan the world surfs the edge? internet
  44. THE STORIES: There were five still photos. NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS LIFE Extra Olympics “Higher Ed” is Leakey: Skepticism Suspect shoots pay for London the a big problem over evolution will Still photo himself after chase subway staff for the NCAA soon be history Belief in global Home prices rise The once and Recommendations Still graphic warming grows around the U.S. future way to run for summer reading A stray bullet, a Nurturing a baby Best sports photos Proud of service, aPhoto gallery world of adjustment and a start-up of the year vet battles PTSD for blind boy How population Graduating into Mariano Rivera’s Dancing cop takes Video grew to 7 billion debt: soaring costs one-of-a-kind, “Travolta Moves” signature pitch to the streets Japan tsunami Which cities have Kobe Bryant vs. Survey shows how Pop-up debris floats closer the competitive Michael Jordan the world surfs the edge? internet
  45. THE STORIES: There were five still graphics. NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS LIFE Extra Olympics “Higher Ed” is Leakey: Skepticism Suspect shoots pay for London the a big problem over evolution will Still photo himself after chase subway staff for the NCAA soon be history Belief in global Home prices rise The once and Recommendations Still graphic warming grows around the U.S. future way to run for summer reading A stray bullet, a Nurturing a baby Best sports photos Proud of service, aPhoto gallery world of adjustment and a start-up of the year vet battles PTSD for blind boy How population Graduating into Mariano Rivera’s Dancing cop takes Video grew to 7 billion debt: soaring costs one-of-a-kind, “Travolta Moves” signature pitch to the streets Japan tsunami Which cities have Kobe Bryant vs. Survey shows how Pop-up debris floats closer the competitive Michael Jordan the world surfs the edge? internet
  46. THE STORIES: There were five photo galleries. NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS LIFE Extra Olympics “Higher Ed” is Leakey: Skepticism Suspect shoots pay for London the a big problem over evolution will Still photo himself after chase subway staff for the NCAA soon be history Belief in global Home prices rise The once and Recommendations Still graphic warming grows around the U.S. future way to run for summer reading A stray bullet, a Nurturing a baby Best sports photos Proud of service, aPhoto gallery world of adjustment and a start-up of the year vet battles PTSD for blind boy How population Graduating into Mariano Rivera’s Dancing cop takes Video grew to 7 billion debt: soaring costs one-of-a-kind, “Travolta Moves” signature pitch to the streets Japan tsunami Which cities have Kobe Bryant vs. Survey shows how Pop-up debris floats closer the competitive Michael Jordan the world surfs the edge? internet
  47. THE STORIES: There were five videos. NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS LIFE Extra Olympics “Higher Ed” is Leakey: Skepticism Suspect shoots pay for London the a big problem over evolution will Still photo himself after chase subway staff for the NCAA soon be history Belief in global Home prices rise The once and Recommendations Still graphic warming grows around the U.S. future way to run for summer reading A stray bullet, a Nurturing a baby Best sports photos Proud of service, aPhoto gallery world of adjustment and a start-up of the year vet battles PTSD for blind boy How population Graduating into Mariano Rivera’s Dancing cop takes Video grew to 7 billion debt: soaring costs one-of-a-kind, “Travolta Moves” signature pitch to the streets Japan tsunami Which cities have Kobe Bryant vs. Survey shows how Pop-up debris floats closer the competitive Michael Jordan the world surfs the edge? internet
  48. THE STORIES: There were five pop-up graphics. NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS LIFE Extra Olympics “Higher Ed” is Leakey: Skepticism Suspect shoots pay for London the a big problem over evolution will Still photo himself after chase subway staff for the NCAA soon be history Belief in global Home prices rise The once and Recommendations Still graphic warming grows around the U.S. future way to run for summer reading A stray bullet, a Nurturing a baby Best sports photos Proud of service, aPhoto gallery world of adjustment and a start-up of the year vet battles PTSD for blind boy How population Graduating into Mariano Rivera’s Dancing cop takes Video grew to 7 billion debt: soaring costs one-of-a-kind, “Travolta Moves” signature pitch to the streets Japan tsunami Which cities have Kobe Bryant vs. Survey shows how Pop-up debris floats closer the competitive Michael Jordan the world surfs the edge? internet
  49. Each home page designs featuredthe same twenty stories.
  50. FINDINGSThis is how people chose.
  51. THE PEOPLE:More people expressed a preference for usinga tablet in a horizontal or landscape orientation. 70% Landscape 30% Portrait
  52. THE PROTOTYPES:83 percent said the traditional prototype wasmost similar to what they regularly use. Carousel Traditional 83% 13% 4% Tile
  53. THE PROTOTYPES:50 percent said they would choosethe carousel design. Carousel Traditional 50% 35% 15% Tile
  54. THE PROTOTYPES:Comments about the tile design:“It’s tidier. I can get through it to save time.”BUT OTHERS SAID ...“It makes me work too hard.”“Makes me do another click.”“I definitely don’t like the ‘mystery meat’ of having to guess what’s behind an image.”
  55. THE PROTOTYPES:Comments about the traditional design:“I like hierarchy.”“I am big on written context. That’s just me. The more description I can get, the more I like it.”“I don’t want to see a democratized judgment. I like to see that some editor has made a judgment for me about what is important.”
  56. THE PROTOTYPES:The carousel was the favorite, but it also drew themost intense reactions, both pro and con. Carousel Traditional 50% 35% 15% Tile
  57. THE PROTOTYPES:People who liked the carousel design said:“It’s like a food buffet—you know what looks appetizing.”“The carousel gives me a quicker idea of what’s there to read.”“I am always drawn to photos first. The carousel seems to give me more choices than other designs.”“Pictures can say a lot.”“It helps me to make a decision quickly.”
  58. THE PROTOTYPES:People who didn’t like the carousel design said:“The carousel might be overwhelming. Carousel“The carousel is too busy. I don’t know which to look at first.”“I don’t like carousels. I (end up looking at) stupid stuff because I look at the photos, instead of headlines. I’d never want to read about the Broadway show, ‘Cats,’ but I am drawn to the photo!”
  59. FINDINGSThe behaviors
  60. THE BEHAVIORS:People tended to enter through a dominant element.
  61. THE BEHAVIORS:This echoes earlier EyeTrack findings(and principles of Gestalt). X
  62. THE BEHAVIORS:In lieu of a clear dominant element,faces also drew a lot of attention.
  63. THE BEHAVIORS:In lieu of a clear dominant element,faces also drew a lot of attention.
  64. THE BEHAVIORS:In lieu of a clear dominant element,faces also drew a lot of attention.
  65. THE BEHAVIORS:People fixated an average of 18 timesbefore choosing their first story. XX XX XX X X X X X X X X XX X X
  66. THE BEHAVIORS:This was likely a way for them to narrowdown their story choice. XX XX XX X X X X X X X X XX X X
  67. THE BEHAVIORS:And …
  68. THE BEHAVIORS:… People who did not finish reading their first storyfixated only nine times before choosing. X X X X X X X X X
  69. THE BEHAVIORS:An overall average of a minute and a half(98.3 seconds) was spent on the first storya person selected to read.Of the people who did not finish reading a story,they read for an average of 78.3 secondsbefore leaving the story entirely.We’ve been calling this the “bail out point.”
  70. THE BEHAVIORS:And it might be a good benchmarkfor establishing a “gold coin” to keepthe reader engaged about halfwaythrough a long story.
  71. THE BEHAVIORS:This could be a simple pullout quote fromsomeone who has yet to appear in the story.Or, an informative visual element that keepsthe reader interested.Or a quick summaryof key points to help thereader feel satisfied withwhat they’ve learned.
  72. THE BEHAVIORS:67 percent used native controls, like the back buttonto get to their second story.
  73. THE BEHAVIORS:… even though nav tools were built in.
  74. THE BEHAVIORS:… even though nav tools were built in.People will default to what they know—if it’s available.
  75. THE BEHAVIORS:Many magazines are set up for readers to swipehorizontally from one story topic to another …
  76. THE BEHAVIORS:And vertical scrolls are often used to godeeper into the same story topic …
  77. THE BEHAVIORS:But we found that readers instinctively swipehorizontally through a photo gallery …
  78. THE BEHAVIORS:… even though photos in a galleryare part of the “same story topic.”
  79. THE BEHAVIORS:People swiped horizontally, regardless of orientation.
  80. THE BEHAVIORS:Few people used thumbnails to progress throughthe gallery. The majority used advance buttons.
  81. FINDINGSThis is how people read.
  82. THE BEHAVIORS: About half of the people tested read methodically, while half read in a scanning manner.Methodical readers 48% 52% Scanning readersRead in sequence. Looked at headlines, lists and other display elementsTended to read story lists without much text reading.from top to bottom. Read part of a story, jumpedMight have looked away from to photos or other elementstext to other elements, but without going back to thewent back to the same place. same place in the text.Tended to read captions.
  83. THE BEHAVIORS:About half of the people tested read methodically,while half read in a scanning manner. Printnets Digital Natives 45-55 years 18-28 years 76% Methodical 75% Scanning 24% 25% Methodical Scanning
  84. THE BEHAVIORS:But both groups read deeply when theyfound what they wanted. Printnets Digital Natives 45-55 years 18-28 years 76% Methodical 75% Scanning 24% 25% Methodical Scanning
  85. THE BEHAVIORS:This goes counter to the assumptionthat young people don’t read. Printnets Digital Natives 45-55 years 18-28 years 76% Methodical 75% Scanning 24% 25% Methodical Scanning
  86. THE BEHAVIORS: 61 percent of readers touched the screen frequently. Others were more hands off.Detached readers 39% 61% Intimate readersTouched the screen Kept almost constantinfrequently, making contact with the iPad screen.deliberate choices to touch. Tended to read one or twoLooked thoroughly to decide lines of text, then made subtle,before they tapped or swiped. frequent swipes to move a few more lines of text intoTouched carefully to arrange a full their field of vision.screen of text, then sat back toread.
  87. THE BEHAVIORS: 61 percent of readers touched the screen frequently. Others were more hands off.Detached readers 39% 61% Intimate readersTouched the Touched thescreen about screen almostfour times a minute. twice that much.
  88. THE BEHAVIORS: INTIMATE READING BEHAVIORIntimate readers use their finger like a teleprompter.
  89. THE BEHAVIORS: INTIMATE READING BEHAVIORAn analog tool helped people keep their place, a digitalversion might have a place in tablet design, too.
  90. FINDINGSHere’s why this wasworth your time.
  91. WHAT THEY CHOSE TO READ:Tablet users have a high number offixations before making a selection.
  92. WHAT THEY CHOSE TO READ:Often, they fixate on the same storymultiple times before choosing it.
  93. WHAT THEY CHOSE TO READ:More fixations before a selectionsuggests the user is more likely toread to completion.
  94. HOW THEY READ:80-90 seconds was the critical‘bail out point.’A gold coin could compelreaders to continue.
  95. HOW THEY READ:Younger readers are morelikely to be scanners.Older readers are morelikely to be methodical.Both read deeply, when theyfind what they want.
  96. @saraquinn — squinn@poynter.org@gotoplanb — davestanton.us@gmail.com

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