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Babies Boogie! Music Based Story Times for Under Twos<br />Sara Figueroa, Children’s Librarian<br />Lindy Janson, Children...
Agenda<br />What to expect for the next 60 minutes<br />Introductions<br /> Opening Song and Dance Routine<br /> Why are y...
Hello Everybody, Glad to See You by Peter and Ellen Allard.<br />From the cd, Sing it! Say it! Stamp it! Sway it! Vol. 2<b...
Why are you here?<br />What do you hope to get out of this?<br /> ideas<br /> samples story times<br /> books<br /> curios...
What do we do?<br />How did it all begin, anyway?<br />What does it involve?	<br />Simple Stories (and if they rhyme they ...
Sample Story Time Plan<br />Sara’s Version (with CD’s)<br />Opening Song: I am here and you are here by Peter and Ellen Al...
Sample Story Time Plan<br />Lindy’s Plan<br />Song: The More We Get Together<br />Finger Play: 1 Little baby rocking in a ...
See for yourself!<br />
Why ?<br />“Music is a great organizer that helps the body and mind work together” (from the National Center for infants, ...
PA Early Learning Standards for Infants and Toddlers<br />www.pakeys.org<br />Standard 9.1a Production and Performance: Mu...
Standard 10.4  Physical Activity: Gross Motor Coordination<br />• Develop control of head and back, progressing to arms an...
• Combine and coordinate arm and leg movements</li></ul>PA Early Learning Standards for Infants and Toddlers<br />
What does the research say?<br />1. Babies need music<br />“Research shows that babies learn and absorb from the moment th...
Research Continued<br />“Anthropologists speculate that babies are born with an innate love of it [Music].” (Turvett 2006)...
Even more research…<br />2. Music supports brain development<br />“A baby's brain is tuned in to music," says Alice Sterli...
and more…<br />3. Music Creates an Environment of Learning<br />Music boosts early learning. (Honig 2004)<br />Toddlers ma...
One more piece of research…<br />http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/social-emotional-development/music.pdf<br />
From Getting in Tune…Bonding<br /><ul><li>Music is a powerful way for children to connect to their roots
0-9 months: babies can pick out mothers voices
Babies actively search out human voices, especially rhythmic ones
Babies respond to music by making eye contact, moving arms and legs or turning their heads
9-18mos. Familiar songs help babies feel safe and secure
18-36mos. Toddlers make up songs and dances
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Babies Boogie: Adding Music and Dance to story time for under Two's

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Babies Boogie: Adding Music and Dance to story time for under Two's

  1. 1. Babies Boogie! Music Based Story Times for Under Twos<br />Sara Figueroa, Children’s Librarian<br />Lindy Janson, Children’s Library Assistant<br />Indian Valley Public Library<br />Telford, PA<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />What to expect for the next 60 minutes<br />Introductions<br /> Opening Song and Dance Routine<br /> Why are you Here?<br /> What we do<br /> Why we do it<br /> How you can do it, too<br /> Bibliography<br /> Closing Song and Dance Routine<br /> Questions<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. Hello Everybody, Glad to See You by Peter and Ellen Allard.<br />From the cd, Sing it! Say it! Stamp it! Sway it! Vol. 2<br />Buy it here: peterandellen.com/product<br />Opening Song And Dance<br />
  5. 5. Why are you here?<br />What do you hope to get out of this?<br /> ideas<br /> samples story times<br /> books<br /> curiosity<br /> find research to support what you do<br />
  6. 6. What do we do?<br />How did it all begin, anyway?<br />What does it involve? <br />Simple Stories (and if they rhyme they are even better!)<br />Action Rhymes<br />Finger plays<br />Music<br />Rhythm and Movement<br />What does Babies Boogie entail?<br />
  7. 7. Sample Story Time Plan<br />Sara’s Version (with CD’s)<br />Opening Song: I am here and you are here by Peter and Ellen Allard from Sing it say it stamp it sway it # 2<br />Action Rhyme: I'm a little Snowman, short and fat(hold out arms) Here is my broomstick (hold out one arm)Here is my hat(point to head)When the sun comes out I melt away(put head in lap)But you can make me again some day(sit back up)<br />Book: Snip, Snip…Snow! By Nancy Poydar<br />Song: Shake it and you’ll be happy by Bobby Susser from Wiggle Wiggle <br />Finger Play: Open Shut them<br />Book: Katy and the Big Snow by Virginia Lee Burton<br />Song: I’ve got two hands by Peter and Ellen Allard from Sing it say it stamp it sway it # 2<br />Action Rhyme: Let your hands clap, clap, clap (clap hands three times) Let your fingers tap, tap, tap(tap fingers three times) Fold your arms and quiet be.(fold arms) Roll your hands so wide awake (roll hands) Let your fingers shake, shake, shake (shake fingers)<br />Book: Six Snowy Sheep by Judith Ross Enderle<br />Action Rhyme/Song: Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes<br />Book: Snow Balls by Lois Ehlert<br />Closing Rhyme: Teddy Bear Teddy Bear Turn Around<br />Closing Song: We Had a Good Day by Dr. Jean from Kiss Your Brain<br />
  8. 8. Sample Story Time Plan<br />Lindy’s Plan<br />Song: The More We Get Together<br />Finger Play: 1 Little baby rocking in a tree (pretend to rock baby) 2 little babies splashing in the sea (splash hands) 3 little babies crawl across the floor (do crawling motion) 4 little babies banging on the door (do banging motion) 5 little babies playing hide and seek (hide eyes behind hands)….and peek! (pop hands open)<br />Book: Wiggle by Doreen Cronin<br />Song: Twinkle, Twinkle <br />Action Rhyme: Clap, Clap, Clap…just like me<br />Book: Where’s Spotby Eric Hill<br />Song: Oh, I wish I were a Puppy<br />Finger Play: Open/Shut Them<br />Book:Clap You Hands by Cauley<br />Song: Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes<br />Closing Song (with Book):If You’re Happy and You Know it by Carter<br />
  9. 9. See for yourself!<br />
  10. 10. Why ?<br />“Music is a great organizer that helps the body and mind work together” (from the National Center for infants, toddlers, and families: zerotothree.org) <br />
  11. 11. PA Early Learning Standards for Infants and Toddlers<br />www.pakeys.org<br />Standard 9.1a Production and Performance: Music and Movement<br />Supportive Practices:<br />The adult will:<br />• Sing, hum, and chant to infants<br />• Provide soothing music, such as birds singing or water babbling<br />• Include movement to music in daily routine<br />• Hold infants and rock or move to music<br />• Play different types of music<br />• Provide sound-making toys<br />• Include opportunities for dancing through the day<br />• Provide opportunities to mimic movement sequences<br />
  12. 12. Standard 10.4 Physical Activity: Gross Motor Coordination<br />• Develop control of head and back, progressing to arms and legs<br /><ul><li>Control and coordinate movement of arms, legs and neck
  13. 13. • Combine and coordinate arm and leg movements</li></ul>PA Early Learning Standards for Infants and Toddlers<br />
  14. 14. What does the research say?<br />1. Babies need music<br />“Research shows that babies learn and absorb from the moment they are born and even before that.” (Marino 2003)<br />Mem Fox says in her book Reading Magic “Children’s brains are only 25 percent developed at birth.From that moment whenever a baby is fed, cuddled, played with, talked to sung to or read to, the other 75 percent of its brain begins to develop.” (Fox 13, 14)<br />“Babies have an innate affinity for music, and respond emotionally to it as much as adults do” (S.B. 200)<br />Babies may be born rhythmically to move to the beat of music. (Forte 2010) <br />
  15. 15. Research Continued<br />“Anthropologists speculate that babies are born with an innate love of it [Music].” (Turvett 2006)<br />“But even though babies are sophisticated listeners--research shows they can understand sounds and patterns, remember melodies, and detect changes in tempo and rhythm--their love of music really stems from the way it's delivered.” (Sandra E. Trehub, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Toronto)<br />New moms and mom’s with young babies need to meet other moms, need something to do, and sometimes need guidance in how to start doing early literacy activities with their children. (Me)<br />
  16. 16. Even more research…<br />2. Music supports brain development<br />“A baby's brain is tuned in to music," says Alice Sterling Honig, PhD, professor emerita of child development at Syracuse University in New York. "We know that soothing melodies can bring sleep, that tunes combined with words can promote language development and that the inclusion of music in playtime can help even a shy child warm up and join in.” (Turvett 2006)<br />“When you sing to your baby, she isn't simply hearing the lyrical, rhythmic tones of the song, she's also seeing your loving face and enjoying the warm, close feeling of being held or rocked.” (Horsch 2004) <br />
  17. 17. and more…<br />3. Music Creates an Environment of Learning<br />Music boosts early learning. (Honig 2004)<br />Toddlers may still be speaking in two- and three-word sentences but be able to sing far longer phrases. Thus, singing nursery songs frequently with toddlers will help them stretch their ability to put words together. (Honig 2004)<br />“Songs help babies increase their repertoire of words.” (Honig 2004) <br />“Toddlers learn to coordinate large-muscle movements as they hold hands, circle around, and sing songs such as Ring Around a Rosy.” (Honig 2004)<br /> “The goal of the program is not to create “super “ babies who read by the age of three, but to set the stage for lifelong readers who will in turn share books and finger games with their young children.” (Jeffrey 1995)<br />
  18. 18. One more piece of research…<br />http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/social-emotional-development/music.pdf<br />
  19. 19. From Getting in Tune…Bonding<br /><ul><li>Music is a powerful way for children to connect to their roots
  20. 20. 0-9 months: babies can pick out mothers voices
  21. 21. Babies actively search out human voices, especially rhythmic ones
  22. 22. Babies respond to music by making eye contact, moving arms and legs or turning their heads
  23. 23. 9-18mos. Familiar songs help babies feel safe and secure
  24. 24. 18-36mos. Toddlers make up songs and dances
  25. 25. Toddlers sing to themselves for comfort</li></li></ul><li>From Getting in TuneLearning<br /><ul><li>0-9mos. Babies respond to singing and talking by waving their arms, kicking their feet, and smiling.
  26. 26. 9-18mos. As soon as they’re able, children move to the beat
  27. 27. 18-36mos. Toddlers dance with each other which reinforces socialization. </li></li></ul><li>From Getting in Tune…Music and Creativity<br /><ul><li>Musical exchange between babies and their parents is a springboard for creativity and imagination.
  28. 28. 0-9mos. Babies wiggle, kick and stretch to the sounds they hear.
  29. 29. 9-18mos. Children are becoming much more mobile and can dance in new and creative ways
  30. 30. 18-36mos. Older Toddlers come together in free play to form a kind of band- important social skills as children work together.</li></li></ul><li>Why do we think it’s good for Libraries?<br /><ul><li> It’s fun for us, it’s fun for them. Fun experiences make lifetime library users.
  31. 31. Gets rid of the stuffy library image and makes us more up to date with the latest research
  32. 32. Supports multiple learning styles
  33. 33. Parents like it
  34. 34. If people like it, it will get them in the building
  35. 35. If people are in the building, they are more likely to check out books
  36. 36. If they check out books, our circulation goes up.
  37. 37. Our programming supports our collection, which helps make a case to get the funding we need to make sure libraries keep existing.</li></li></ul><li>How can you do it?<br />Steal ideas <br />Start slowly- add in one song or dance time to your current story time<br />Show your boss the research<br />Explain, explain, explain- tell everyone why babies under 2 want to dance even if they can’t do the “right motions”<br />Advertise<br />Practice<br />
  38. 38. Bibliography<br />Forte, Tiffany. “Born to Dance?” Work Mother; Oct 2010; 33, 7; pg. 172-173 <br />Honig, Alice SterlingTITLE:Communicating With Babies Through MusicSOURCE:Scholastic Early Childhood Today 18 no5 24-6 Mr 2004 <br />Horsch, Karen. “Music to Bond By.” Baby Talk no10 14 D 2003/Ja 2004 <br />S.B.TITLE:Tuning Up the BrainSOURCE:Newsweek 136 no17A 28 Fall/Wint 2000<br />Turvett, Barbara. ”Playtime Tune-up.”Work Mother; Apr 2006; 29, 3; pg. 68ISSN: 0278-193XPublisher: Working Woman/McCall's Group<br />
  39. 39. Let’s Practice!<br />Contact us: Sara sfigueroa@ivpl.org<br /> @mssarafig<br />Blog: http://www.mssaramakingnoise.wordpress.com<br /> Lindy: ljanson@ivpl.org<br />

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