Great Leaders take Risk                              Building aWorld-Class Software Product Development                   ...
BEA Systems Inc. – Introduction  The Middleware Company      “BMW” of Infrastructure Software Industry      “Software th...
BEA – A History of Risk Taking 1995: Tuxedo Purchase from Novell     Helped crystallize the middleware market-segment 199...
WLI Move to BEA, Bangalore   India R&D Center      About four years in operation      Initial teams focused on sustainin...
Engineering Team Parameters Balance in Product & Technical Expertise (“DNA”)     Mix of new hires from similar product or...
Placing Bets on People & Team Individual Level Roles     Developers taking on new or unfamiliar sub-systems     An QA en...
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Building a World-Class Software Product Team in India

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Steps and process involved in moving and building an enterprise-scale software product in India.

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Building a World-Class Software Product Team in India

  1. 1. Great Leaders take Risk Building aWorld-Class Software Product Development Team in India Sanjeev Kumar VP, Engineering & Head, India Technology Center BEA Systems India August 2007 BEA Confidential. | 1
  2. 2. BEA Systems Inc. – Introduction The Middleware Company  “BMW” of Infrastructure Software Industry  “Software that customers use to build their software”  FedEx, DHL, WFB, PG&E, eTrade, Verizon, NYT, ideaCellular, Railways Brands & Products  WebLogic: WL Platform, WLS, WLW, WLP, WLI, WLCP, WLEvS  AquaLogic: ALSB, ALBPM, ALUI, ALER, ALDSP, ALES, ALSR  Tuxedo: Core (/T, /Q, /WS, /Domain, /M, /HA), SALT, Jolt
  3. 3. BEA – A History of Risk Taking 1995: Tuxedo Purchase from Novell  Helped crystallize the middleware market-segment 1998: WebLogic Inc.  Bet-the-company acquisition, created J2EE app server market  Best value-creation via acquisition (till VMWare acquisition) 2001: CrossGain & Westside  Web Services, Controls & IDE; Did not meet expectations 2006: WebLogic Integration (WLI) in India  All engineering functions to be done in Bangalore
  4. 4. WLI Move to BEA, Bangalore India R&D Center  About four years in operation  Initial teams focused on sustaining engineering  Currently 2:1 split in favor of mainline projects WLI Functions at BLR Lab in 2006  40% of development projects  Most of QA, sustaining engineering and backline support Risks  Ownership of overall design and code-base  No prior record in release and program management  High degree of interactions and dependencies (“chatty-ness”)
  5. 5. Engineering Team Parameters Balance in Product & Technical Expertise (“DNA”)  Mix of new hires from similar product or competing companies  Few senior engineers with a three-year history with the product  Skills coverage on all the building-block technologies used Balance in Team  Small “pyramid” teams, anchored by experienced engineers  Technical Depth, Energy Levels, “Can-do” Attitude & Motivation  An environment for technical discourse and a “positive echo” Coverage in all Functions  Development and QA are well understood  Release Management: inter-team interactions & dependencies  Program Management: bridge customer-view and product internals
  6. 6. Placing Bets on People & Team Individual Level Roles  Developers taking on new or unfamiliar sub-systems  An QA engineer learns to be a release manager (“herding cats!”)  An architect from an ERP product company steps up as program mgr Performance as a Collective (Engineering Team)  Weekly local product team meeting covering all functions  Ability to break-down high-level requirements into manageable chunks  Estimation of schedule at task, intermediate milestone and release levels “External” Interactions as Growth Opportunities  Critical customer situations: leads visiting serious deployments sites  Local beta customers: feedback loop on functional & operational aspects  Local training courses: leads conducting Q&A sessions with customers

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