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SGCI - The Science Gateways Community Institute: International Collaboration on World-Wide Scale

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Science gateways - also called virtual research environments or virtual labs - allow science and engineering communities to access shared data, software, computing services, instruments, and other resources specific to their disciplines. The US Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI), opened in August 2016, provides free resources, services, experts, and ideas for creating and sustaining science gateways. It offers five areas of services to the science gateway developer and user communities: the Incubator, Extended Developer Support, the Scientific Software Collaborative, Community Engagement and Exchange, and Workforce Development. While all these services are available to US-based communities, the Incubator, the Scientific Software Collaborative and the Community Engagement and Exchange serve also the international communities. SGCI aims at supporting beyond borders on international scale with diverse measures and to form and deepen collaborations with partner organizations and coalitions beneficial and/or related to the science gateways community. Research topics are independent of national borders and researchers spread worldwide can benefit from each other’s research results, software, data and from lessons learned — via online materials and publications or at international events. The gateway community has benefitted from this type of exchange for years and one mission of SGCI is to support the international community. This talk will present related work describing the benefits of international collaborations generally, and specifically as they relate to science gateways. It will go into detail regarding SGCI’s ongoing work on an international scale and SGCI's work planned in the near future to foster collaborations under consideration of challenges such as different timezones and long distances between collaborators.

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SGCI - The Science Gateways Community Institute: International Collaboration on World-Wide Scale

  1. 1. Award Number ACI-1547611 The Science Gateways Community Institute: International Collaboration on World-Wide Scale Sandra Gesing sandra.gesing@nd.edu 2 November 2017 Victoria University of Wellington, ECS, New Zealand
  2. 2. 2 • In the middle of nowhere of northern Indiana (1.5 h from Chicago) • 4 undergraduate colleges • ~35 research institutes and centers • ~12,000 students University of Notre Dame
  3. 3. University of Notre Dame
  4. 4. Center for Research Computing • Software development and profiling • Cyberinfrastructure/science gateway development • Computational Scientist support • Collaborative research/ grant development • System administration/ prototype architectures • Computational resources: 25,000 cores+ • Storage resources: 3 PB • National resources (e.g., XSEDE) • ~40 researchers, research programmers, HPC specialists CRC and OIT building http://crc.nd.edu CRC HPC Center (old Union Stati
  5. 5. 5 Data- and compute- intensive problems Research Infrastructures NO geographical boundaries Geographical boundaries
  6. 6. Importance of Scientific Software In 2009 a survey was published with answers from 2000 researchers. •  91% answered that using scientific software is important for their own research •  84% answered that developing scientific software is important for their own research •  53.5% answered that they spend more time developing scientific software than they did 10 years ago •  38% spend at least one fifth of their time developing software J.E. Hannay et al., "How Do Scientists Develop and Use Scientific Software?", Proc. ICSE Workshop Software Eng. for Computational Science and Eng., pp. 1-8, 2009.
  7. 7. State of the Art 7 Increased complexity of •  research questions •  hardware •  software •  instruments •  data volume •  data formats The need for end- to-end solutions for accessing data, software, computing services, and equipment specific to the needs of a science or engineering discipline
  8. 8. Science Gateways 8 Increased complexity of •  research questions •  hardware •  software •  instruments •  data volume •  data formats The need for end- to-end solutions for accessing data, software, computing services, and equipment specific to the needs of a science or engineering disciplineScience Gateways!
  9. 9. 9
  10. 10. 10 It’s a Science Gateway It’s a Research Portal It’s a Collaboratory It’s a Cyber- infrastructure It’s a Virtual Research Environment It’s a Virtual Lab
  11. 11. Technologies •  Widely used complete frameworks (Galaxy, HUBzero, Open Science Framework, Globus etc.) •  RESTful APIs and support of multiple programming languages in widely used frameworks (Apache Airavata, the Agave platform, etc.) •  Reused interface implementations such as the one of CIPRES with its RESTful API (CIPRES has served more than 20,000 users to date) •  Science gateways as a service with provision of hardware in the background such as SciGap (Science Gateway Platform as a Service) Lessons learned: approaches should be technology agnostic, using APIs and standard web technologies OR deliver a complete solution Community Engagement is key HUBzero users world wide
  12. 12. Technologies User Interface Layer HPC Facili4es Services Layer Workflow management Data management Storage Grid and Cloud services Metadata services Applica4on Layer
  13. 13. Large Infrastructure Projects
  14. 14. Large Infrastructure Projects •  MARVL •  HuNI •  CVL •  ENDOVL •  ASVO •  Industrial Ecology (IE) VL •  Alveo •  VGL •  BCCVL •  VHIRL •  GVL
  15. 15. Large Infrastructure Projects
  16. 16. Large Infrastructure Projects 16 •  2004 TeraGrid project director Rick Stevens recognized growth in scientific portal development and proposed the Science Gateway Program •  Followed up by XSEDE’s Science Gateway Program All users Gateways Login Gateway users are 77% of active XSEDE users in Q4 2016
  17. 17. Many Successful Groups/Centers at Universities Benefits •  Great visibility for the institution’s research activities •  Synergy between projects •  Shared resources, costs and expertise across departments •  Lower learning curves •  Expertise that is otherwise difficult for individual projects to obtain •  Ability to retain top-quality research computing support by providing interesting projects Examples for success stories: •  Center for Research Computing at the University of Notre Dame •  HUBzero Team at the Purdue University •  Science Gateways Research Center at the Indiana University •  Science Gateway Group at TACC (University of Texas, Austin)
  18. 18. Funding Bodies Funding bodies such as NSF and NIH mention science gateways direct in solicitations and roadmaps! https://dibbs17.org/ report/Presentations/ KeynoteQualters.pdf
  19. 19. Science Gateways Survey 2014 19 •  29,000-person survey •  4957 responses from across domains Respondents’ domains •  52% from life, physical or mathematical sciences •  32% from computer and information sciences or engineering Areas of software development !
  20. 20. Science Gateways Community Institute - Conceptualization 20 What services would be helpful? Proposed Service % Interest Evaluation, impact analysis, website analytics 72% Adapting technologies 67% Web/visual/graphic design 67% Choosing technologies 66% Usability Services 66% Visualization 65% Developing open-source software 64% Support for education 64% Community engagement mechanisms 62% Keeping your project running 62% Legal perspectives 61% Managing data 60% Computational resources 59% Mobile technology 59% Database structure, optimization, and query expertise 59% Data mining and analysis 58% Cybersecurity consultation 57% Website construction 57% Software engineering process consultation 53% Source code review and/or audit 51% High-bandwidth networks 45% Scientific instruments or data streams 44% Management aspects of a project 38% •  45% develop data collections •  44% develop data analysis tools •  88% felt Web-based applications were important to their work
  21. 21. Science Gateways Survey 2014 21 34% 36% 20% 17% 31% 26% 42% 16% 30% 18% 45% 44% 14% 15% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Usability Consultant Graphic Designer Community Liaison/ Evangelist Project Manager Professional Software Developer Security Expert Quality Assurance and Testing Expert Wished we had this Yes, we had this Well-designed gateways require a variety of expertise
  22. 22. Science Gateways Community Institute •  Funded from 1 Aug 2016 – 31 Jul 2021 by NSF •  Diverse expertise on demand •  Longer term support engagements •  Software and visibility for gateways •  Information exchange in a community environment •  Student opportunities and more stable career paths help@sciencegateways.org http://sciencegateways.org/
  23. 23. Science Gateways Community Institute •  International Collaborations help@sciencegateways.org http://sciencegateways.org/
  24. 24. Incubator Service 24 Technology Planning •  Choosing technologies •  Cybersecurity •  Software engineering •  Interfaces to compute and data •  Business model development •  Financial planning •  Project management •  Software licensing •  Staff and sustainability planning Business Planning Specialized Expertise Security • Center for Trustworthy Scientific Cyberinfrastructure Sustainability • Nancy Maron, creator of the ITHAKA S+R course on Sustaining Digital Resources Evaluation & Impact Measurement • Ann Zimmerman Consulting Campus Resource Development Client Interaction Planning •  Usability studies •  Web/visual/graphic design •  Impact measurement •  Community engagement •  Support for education Common Experiences •  Training sessions •  Group interactions Continuing Engagement •  Customized structure, content, goals •  Mentoring •  Pay It Forward A Framework for Decision Making Network / Cohort Formation An Ongoing Dispassionate Ear
  25. 25. Bootcamp at a Glance 25 •  5 full days •  Knowledge dissemination •  Interactivity •  Community formation •  Putting away the normal daily routine •  Homework
  26. 26. COURSE PLAN Introductions Course Outline and Goals The “Napkin” Drawing Defining Your Value Proposition 26 Your Audience(s) and Stakeholders Mapping the landscape Going beyond your initial market Technology, Open Source User Centered Design Goal Setting Budgeting Cybersecurity On-Campus Support Funding Models Marketing & Outreach Outreach Your Sustainability Model – Making Your Case Impact Measurement Case Study Next Steps Closing MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
  27. 27. Bootcamps 27 •  twice per year •  additional ones can be booked (travel expenses for presenters) •  adapted to feedback Bootcamp 1 Bootcamp 2
  28. 28. Feedback to the Bootcamps 28 Bootcamp 1 Bootcamp 2
  29. 29. Feedback to the Bootcamps 29 Bootcamp 1 Bootcamp 2
  30. 30. Feedback to the Bootcamps 30 "The Science Gateways Bootcamp is useful to people involved at any stage of their science gateway project, and in any role. Their experts have you consider all aspects of sustainability, from understanding your unique value proposition and audience, through to best practices and standards in software development. They cultivate a lively, active, hands-on environment. A great experience overall.” Steve Androulakis Manager — Community Platforms, NeCTAR.org.au, ANDS.org.au, RDS.org.au (now at Amazon) "The SGCI Bootcamp has fundamentally altered, in a constructive way, my view toward developing and implementing the projects on which I work. The work during the week helped me to generate a new approach to the gateway on which I'm working that has much greater potential to be successful, and I intend to apply the ideas and concepts from the Bootcamp to all project phases, from idea to implementation.” Christopher Lenhardt Domain Scientist for Environmental Data Science & Systems, RENCI Data Observatory Risk Analytics Discovery Environment (RADE) gateway https://sciencegateways.org/-/reflections-from-the-inaugural-science-gateways-bootcamp-in-april-2017
  31. 31. On-Campus Teams - Opportunities •  A breadth of interesting topics in the science gateway creation process •  Novel frameworks and web applications •  Inter- and multidisciplinary work •  Contributing to grand challenges, e.g., Malaria eradication •  … •  A breadth of interesting roles •  Designers, statisticians, librarians, machine learning experts, usability experts,… 31
  32. 32. On-Campus Teams - Challenges •  Some topics and roles are only needed for part of the project ⇒ Not fully funded positions via one project ⇒ For diverse expertise, several different people are needed 32
  33. 33. Sustainability via On-Campus Teams 33 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Typical Research Team Extended Research Team Shared On- Campus Team Q&A Expert Security Expert Usability Expert Graphic Designer Professional Software Developer Postdoc PhD Student Potential salary cost distribution
  34. 34. Sustainability via On-Campus Teams 34 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Typical Research Team Extended Research Team Shared On- Campus Team Q&A Expert Security Expert Usability Expert Graphic Designer Professional Software Developer Postdoc PhD Student Potential salary cost distribution Increase of quality of application and efficiency of software development
  35. 35. Sustainability via On-Campus Teams 35 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Typical Research Team Extended Research Team Shared On- Campus Team Q&A Expert Security Expert Usability Expert Graphic Designer Professional Software Developer Postdoc PhD Student Potential salary cost distribution Increased possibility of research team to focus on research
  36. 36. Sustainability via On-Campus Teams •  Great visibility for the institution’s research activities •  Synergy effects between projects •  Shared resources, costs and expertise across departments •  Lower learning curves •  Expertise that is otherwise difficult for individual projects to obtain •  Ability to retain top-quality research computing support by providing interesting projects 36
  37. 37. Scientific Software Collaborative 37 End-to-End Solutions •  Serve a diverse set of scientific domains •  Out-of-the-box gateway solution that can be customized •  Based on Docker – executable images that are the skeleton for a secure and functioning gateway •  Portable and reproducible •  Community-contributed •  API integration •  Variety of services •  Information •  Security •  Execution •  Data •  Event •  Accounting •  Hosting opportunity “Use-what-you- need” Gateway Discovery •  Open registry •  Promotes use of existing science gateways •  Community-contributed •  Admin approval •  Automated cleanup Software Integration & Community Contribution •  Docking mechanisms for community- contributed software, including NSF SI2 •  Incorporate community standards Engage Other Areas of Institute •  Support projects leverage Collaborative components •  Framework evolves as a result of gateway engagements •  Community outreach Software Marketplace for Science Gateways
  38. 38. Scientific Software Collaborative 38
  39. 39. Gateway Catalog 39
  40. 40. Gateway Catalog 40
  41. 41. Community Engagement and Exchange 41 Website Activities •  Discussion forums •  Gateway showcase with case studies •  Monthly webinar series •  Newsletters with1,300 subscribers •  News: media coverage, related happenings, academic publications, job openings, events calendar •  Curated blog with guest authors •  Professional development: synchronous and asynchronous training •  Capture client/user feedback on web and through other areas •  Tutorials and workshops •  Paper presentations •  Invited keynotes and panels •  Interactive elements: Open Space, poster session •  Travel support for students and campus IT staff Builds on 10 years of experience with GCE and IWSG series Annual Conference Campus Gateway Groups •  Task force builds campus-based expertise •  Channel for scaling institute services Outreach to Complementary NSF Initiatives •  NSF SI2 projects •  Large NSF projects •  Science and Technology Centers •  Engineering Research Centers •  MolSSI software institute collaboration
  42. 42. Science Gateways Events •  2006: GCE (Gateway Computing Environment) workshop series started – successful 10th anniversary in 2015 •  since 2009: European IWSG (International Workshop on Science Gateways) 10th IWSG will take place 13-15 June 2018 in Edinburgh, UK •  since 2015: Australian IWSG-A (International Workshop on Science Gateways – Australia) Was two weeks ago in Brisbane, Australia •  2016: GCE extended to Gateways conference with 160 participants at the first event Gateways 2018 will take place 25-27 September in Austin, Texas, USA
  43. 43. International Coalition on Science Gateways Partners: Science Gateways Community Institute (USA) NeCTAR (Australia) NESI (New Zealand) Sci-GaIA (Africa) Academia Sinica Grid Computing Center (Taiwan) Software Sustainability Institute (UK) VRE4E1C (Europe) IWSG (Europe) CANARIE (Canada) Research Data Canada (Canada) IEEE Technical Area on Science Gateways (International) RDA VRE-IG (International) The International Coalition on Science Gateways aims to provide an international forum for the science gateways community to: •  Provide leadership on future directions for science gateways •  Facilitate awareness and international, regional and national developments in science gateways •  Identify and share best practice in the field http://www.icsciencegateways.org/
  44. 44. International Collaboration •  Improving national competitiveness •  Supporting less developed countries by developing science, technology and innovation capabilities •  Tackling global challenges such as climate change, health issues and sustainable energy resources •  Creating good and stable diplomatic relationships (and indirectly ensuring international security) •  Globalization is not new but more and more evident in industrial research and the worldwide mobility of researchers •  Smaller countries tend to collaborate internationally more often than bigger ones •  Publications with international partners are more cited than publications with one author or a group of authors from one country. http://www.eurosfaire.prd.fr/7pc/doc/ 1266832886_drivers_of_international_cooperation_in_research.pdf
  45. 45. Next Steps •  Collaboration, collaboration, collaboration… •  Working groups •  Integration of instruments with research infrastructures •  Sustainable science gateways •  Openly sharing of software and data - repositories •  Advancing searchability of software and data •  Reproducibility •  Processing of data •  Reports/recommendations to RIs and funding bodies on policies
  46. 46. Thanks for your attention! help@sciencegateways.org http://sciencegateways.org/ 46

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