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The Evolution of
Mobile Security
Fifteen years of learning from mobile mistakes
The first
smartphones
start to appear
Palm added email, basic
web access and a phone to
a personal organizerwith
the Treo ...
2006
Nokia’s N95 made
camera, music and
GPS a priority.
Name: Software 2.0
Publisher: ABD Software Inc.
From: http//: ABDs...
2007
Early iPhones used ASLR, code signing,
sandboxing and hardware encryption,
setting new expectations forphones.
Hash
F...
Read on formore Mobile Security historical facts
Protect Your Enterprise With
Samsung Knox Security
Discoverwhy Samsung ph...
2008
Policies
Manage
Devices
InfoSec and
ITManagers
Exchange Server
With ActiveSync
Microsoft Exchange
ActiveSync (EAS)
bu...
2010
Android v2.2 makes
EAS management easy
with built-in support
Security policy controls like remote
wipe became part of...
2012
Samsung Knox identifies
key enterprise security
requirements
Samsung began investing in
securityto make Android
enter...
2013
TrustZone, a secure
mode supported by
ARM processors,
protects information
against compromise.
Normal
Apps
Nonsecure ...
2014 2017
READ
ONLY
RKP
SECURE WORLD NORMALWORLD
KERNEL
Control instructions and page table
update functions are replaced ...
2018
Samsung Knox continues
to blaze the trail in mobile
security, as olderfeatures
are reimagined by Google
forAndroid.
K...
©2019 Samsung Electronics America, Inc. Samsung is a registered mark of Samsung Electronics Corp., Ltd. All brand, product...
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The Evolution of Mobile Security

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Smartphones have long been established in business, and the security that protects the sensitive data they handle has evolved just as dramatically as the devices over the past 15 years.

The world of smartphones started slowly as cell phone manufacturers began adding features to their mobile phones that took advantage of the newly available data networks: email and collaboration tools first, then other dedicated applications and, finally, web browsing. Convergence came from both sides. For example, Palm took their wildly popular personal organizer and added a cell phone to it. When the Palm Treo 650 came out in 2004, it was clear that you didn't have to be Motorola to make a "smart" cellphone.

Management and security, however, were not top-of-mind.

Mobile Security's Infancy
It wasn't until 2006 that Symbian, Nokia's smartphone operating system, added features such as requiring applications to be signed — combating widespread problems with viruses arriving over Bluetooth connections. That was the year Nokia shipped the Symbian-based N95, the first smartphone that combined outstanding camera, music and GPS navigation together with traditional business applications.

Meanwhile, security management of smartphones lagged. Microsoft broke through the management barriers with their under-the-radar Mobile Device Management (MDM) tool, Exchange Active Sync (EAS). EAS v12 was released in 2008, which gave every IT manager running Microsoft Exchange (the overwhelming choice of enterprises) the ability to easily manage smartphone security at no additional charge. In 2010, Android v2.2 jumped on the MDM bandwagon by building in support for Microsoft EAS. Android was beginning to shift from a hobbyist experiment to something mainstream enterprises could use.

Two years later, in 2012, Samsung saw the potential of smartphones in the enterprise — and the need for security. They started the Samsung Knox program to identify enterprise security requirements and push them into the Android platform and Samsung hardware. Samsung worked within the security and Android communities to drive security improvements such as Security Enhanced Linux into mainline Android.

Samsung's Knox investment in Android security continued through the years, with additional features such as biometric identification standards, real-time kernel protection and separate work/home profiles.

Because Samsung is committed to securing the Android ecosystem, many of these have made their way back into the standard Android operating system — and into other vendors' smartphone hardware. To close the loop, Samsung Knox 3.0, released in 2018, harmonized many of the security features between Samsung hardware and software and the core Android operating system.

Read this infographic to learn more about how mobile security has evolved over the years.

Published in: Technology
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The Evolution of Mobile Security

  1. 1. The Evolution of Mobile Security Fifteen years of learning from mobile mistakes
  2. 2. The first smartphones start to appear Palm added email, basic web access and a phone to a personal organizerwith the Treo 650. There was almost no security. 2004
  3. 3. 2006 Nokia’s N95 made camera, music and GPS a priority. Name: Software 2.0 Publisher: ABD Software Inc. From: http//: ABDsoftware2.com CERTIFICATE Symbian and Nokia take viruses seriously Symbian 9 required most apps to be signed to protect against viruses.
  4. 4. 2007 Early iPhones used ASLR, code signing, sandboxing and hardware encryption, setting new expectations forphones. Hash Function Code Hashed Code Signed Code SignatureEncrypt Hash Using a Private Key Attached to Code Encrypted Hash & Time Stamp Apple reinvents the phone with open software, closed hardware
  5. 5. Read on formore Mobile Security historical facts Protect Your Enterprise With Samsung Knox Security Discoverwhy Samsung phones are the most secure and manageable mobile devices available.
  6. 6. 2008 Policies Manage Devices InfoSec and ITManagers Exchange Server With ActiveSync Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync (EAS) builds in MDM Microsoft built basic MDM feature into EAS, bolstering admin security. BlackBerry broadened MDM beyond Exchange in 2009. Mobile Devices
  7. 7. 2010 Android v2.2 makes EAS management easy with built-in support Security policy controls like remote wipe became part of mainstream Android, shifting it toward enterprise environments. REMOTE WIPE
  8. 8. 2012 Samsung Knox identifies key enterprise security requirements Samsung began investing in securityto make Android enterprise-safe, pushing features like SE Linux into the mainstream.
  9. 9. 2013 TrustZone, a secure mode supported by ARM processors, protects information against compromise. Normal Apps Nonsecure World Client TEE API Rich OS Trusted Apps Secure World Secure TEE API Trusted OS Monitor ARM Security Extensions TrustZone protects encryption keys and identity information
  10. 10. 2014 2017 READ ONLY RKP SECURE WORLD NORMALWORLD KERNEL Control instructions and page table update functions are replaced by traps to the Secure World Page tables are mapped read-only so they cannot be directly modified by the kernel Galaxy Note4 (2014) Galaxy Note Edge (2014) Galaxy Note5 (2015) Galaxy S7 (2016) Galaxy Note8 (2017) Galaxy S8 (2017) Samsung Knox innovations continue to add security to Android Knox brought critical features to Android, like biometrics, real-time kernel protection and separate work/home profiles.
  11. 11. 2018 Samsung Knox continues to blaze the trail in mobile security, as olderfeatures are reimagined by Google forAndroid. Knox 3.0 joins Google’s Android Enterprise with Samsung security
  12. 12. ©2019 Samsung Electronics America, Inc. Samsung is a registered mark of Samsung Electronics Corp., Ltd. All brand, product, service names and logos are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective manufacturers and companies. Samsung Knox security empowers enterprises to go mobile-first confidently.

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