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D pharmdindia

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This book is made to provide information about recently started Pharm D and Pharm D(Post Bacclaurreatte) courses in india to all.

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D pharmdindia

  1. 1. 3 4 5 13 27 34 39 43 45 48 68 73 82 86 90 114 Table of Contents About the book Copyright Preface Forums About the author career options for those with a degree in Pharmacy Changing Trends in Global Pharmacy Workforce why one should consider Pharm D programme? Pharm D the No. 1 employer in Medical Research ... THE STRUGGLE Pharma Clinic- Now PHARMACISTS can also Practice ... PHARMACOVIGILANCE The State of Affairs of Medical Profession - Pathetic list of ADR monitoring centers under Pharmacovigilance ... articles MoleculesNovel Molecules 2
  2. 2. About the book This book is made to provide information about recently started Pharm D and Pharm D(Post Bacclaurreatte) courses in india to all. 3
  3. 3. Copyright Author [Dr SAMRAT PAUL] Editor [Dr SAMRAT PAUL] Copyright © 2013 [Dr SAMRAT PAUL] First Published using Papyrus,2013 ISBN : [Enter ISBN here] This book may be purchased for educational, business, or sales promotional use. Online edition is also available for this title. For more information, contact our corporate/institutional sales department: [Insert your phone number here] or [Insert your email here] While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this book, the publisher and authors assume no responsibility for errors or omissions, or for damages resulting from the use of the information contained herein. 4
  4. 4. Preface I Samrat Paul , welcome all readers, viewers, researchers and aspirants to this site for upgrading knowledge and aptitude in clinically oriented Pharmacy. This blog is a forum for anyone interested in the intersection of health, communication and social world. The setup is changing in the world. Changes are occuring everywhere, in every field, in every aspect. This is a transition period for everybody, even for Pharmacy Councils of each and every country...Uptill very recently in the past Pharmacy was industry oriented in india , only with the advent of Pharm d and Pharm d(PB) it has become clinically oriented. One must understand why and how the syllabus of this course got structured up? The PharmD syllabus is nothing but a combination of syllabus of courses like B.Pharm (industry oriented pharmacy)) and MD Pharmacology (clinically oriented pharmacy).Many hypotheses which comes to my mind are : 1. If we look into the broader picture, in western allopathy system of healthcare, the ward rounds are done in team by the clinicians ie. healthcare professionals and particularly doctors like physicians, pharmacists and nurses. 5
  5. 5. Now, physicians like MBBS and specialists like MDs and DMs of departments chest, ortho, gyneac, surgery,paediatric,psychologist,pharmacologist were actively participating in the ward rounds and their perspectives were gained. However perspectives from MD pharmacologist point of view were missed considerably by the healthcare team, because MD Pharmacologist were more involved in clinical research rather than in ward rounds. And though they do practice but not in such proportions as done by MDs of other departments. This created a demand and requirement for vigilance by Pharm D professionals to fill up the gap created due to non- availability of MD Pharmacologist for ward round participations. Also MD Pharmacologists are reluctant to do jobs of a bedside pharmacist like strip- cutting, because of their busy schedule and perhaps they consider it as menial job. However, in India, there is still monopoly enjoyed by the physician in clinical setups in most nursing homes and small capacity hospitals regardless of under which sector these fall,private or government (may it be community hospitals, public healthcare hospitals, charitable hospitals,military hospitals, mission hospitals,primary care hospitals,secondary care hospitals,tertiary teaching care hospitals, tertiary referral hospitals,rehabilitation hospitals,for profit hospitals, non profit hospitals,state hospitals, regional hospitals) and alone they do the ward rounds, and rightly so because here economic budget for healthcare and health literacy is very less, constrained or restrained.Therefore a physician who spends a considerable more amount of money on his medical education is rightly empowered with more authority in a clinical setup. 2. Moreover, other education system like M.Pharm in Pharmacy Practice which was started with intention to bring a new setup of clinical pharmacovigilant biopharmaceutical analytical system (Pharm D), due to increase in incidents of deaths due to medical errors and medication errors and due to faulty drug-dose titrations, ADRs and drug -drug interactions and further due to non-vigilance which should be considered as clinical error. But they being new in the clinical setup, confused about their role to play in this new setup and lacked the required 6
  6. 6. proficiency and authority to write independent prescriptions to patients, lacked confidence. Not having the power of writing independent prescriptions (M.Pharm PP and PharmD)is correct also in my opinion due to reasons like for a given patient there can be apart from surgical therapy,radiation therapy, physical therapy, psychotherapy; a pharmacotherapeutic approach and also a non- pharmacotherapeutic approach, therefore a physician should always remain the captain of the ship. Howsoever, to instill confidence in such professionals,a provision had been made so as doctorate degree was conferred to clinical pharmacists of pharmacy practice stream in form of PharmD and PharmD(PB){ 6 years course} as much like MBBS{ 5 year course}, which gave them identity and recognition and respect and competitiveness enough to do atleast ward rounds in presence of other healthcare professionals and be vigilant in the clinical setups of corporate hospitals. Still there are loopholes present in this education system in India such as PCI has termed it as integerated PG course and its not clear or public are not made aware of whether its a professional doctorate( obvious) or academic doctorate or honorary doctorate, also when we come to interns of PharmD there is still no terminologies exist as CRHPs(compulsory rotatory house pharmacists) as compared to CRHSs(compulsory rotatory house surgeons) which is used for MBBS interns. 3. Another point of view is that each and every country has a quo status quo. They are different for each and every country in terms of various factors like culture,traditions and customs followed, liberality provided, economic status, budget affordability, applicable rules and regulations,even HDI(human developement index) and GDPs (gross domestic product) sanctioned by Government. In western developed countries, along with other healthcare sectors/ paramedical course/paraclinical courses, Pharmacy is becoming more IT oriented as well as statistically oriented in its functions and approach towards the society ie. for incorporating more transparency about drug use in society. To homogenise this kind of work system and setup in allover world, a more advanced and upgraded course was brought out for students to pursue. 4. With the improvement in economic status of countries, Government is investing more finance on the budget of Healthcare system for its people. 7
  7. 7. 5. Individualisation of pharmacotherapeutic treatment to individuals. 6. Bringing up a new setup of clinical pharmacovigilant biopharmaceutical analytical system. 8
  8. 8. 9
  9. 9. 7.Bringing up Homogenization of allopathy system, implementation and transparency and upgrading quality and standards of pharmacare, pharma products, drug information, pharmaceutical calculations etc. 10
  10. 10. SOME INTERETING FACTS: Doctor of Pharmacy Education in India-Its Genesis and Prospects: A Critical Study based on the Global Vs. Indian Scenario The post1920 period, particularly the 1940 to 1970s, witnessed many scientific developments and achievements in the area of Hospital and Clinical Pharmacy in USA and such developments helped for starting Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D) in American Universities in the 1950s as an innovative program in pharmacy. Pharm.D.is a professional doctor degree in Pharmacy and has become a global program by 2000 AD. The Pharm.Dstudents are provided with the opportunity to gain experience in patient care at hospital and community levels, in close association with other health care professionals.Universities conducting Pharm.D have to continuously enhance the curriculum with new course offerings that reflect the pharmacist’s importance as a frontline health care provider. The first effort to introduce Pharm.D in India was initiated in Government Medical College ; Trivandrum in 1999 when the syllabus and regulations framed with the help of some American Universities got approved by the Board of Studies and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Kerala. It was designed as a post graduate program,but could not be started for some reasons. Later in 2008, the Pharmacy council of India (PCI) managed to introduce both six year regular PharmD and the three year post baccalaureate Pharm.D in the country through a Gazette notification of Government of India dated 16th May 2008. The norms and regulations for Pharm.D program were also prescribed and notified. By 2013 November, the PCI had given approval to over 140 institutions mainly in South Indian States. Only four Government institutions have so far started 11
  11. 11. Pharm.D in India. The Indian Pharm.D needs the care and active involvements of pharmacy practice professionals in its growing stages. 12
  12. 12. Forums Is Pharm D or PharmD(PB) is a professional doctorate degree or an academic doctorate degree? why is it so that Pharm D course has been initially started in South Indian states only? why GPAT or any other entrance exam is not undertaking Pharm D course? whether Pharm D is approved by UGC? Doctor of Pharmacy Education in India-Its Genesis and Prospects: A Critical Study based on the Global Vs. Indian Scenario The post1920 period, particularly the 1940 to 1970s, witnessed many scientific developments and achievements in the area of Hospital and Clinical Pharmacy in USA and such developments helped for starting Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D) in American Universities in the 1950s as an innovative program in pharmacy. Pharm.D.is a professional doctor degree in Pharmacy and has become a global program by 2000 AD. The Pharm.D students are provided with the opportunity to gain experience in patient care at hospital and community levels, in close association with other health care professionals.Universities conducting Pharm.D have to continuously enhance the curriculum with new course offerings that reflect the pharmacist’s importance as a frontline health care provider. The first effort to introduce Pharm.D in India was initiated in Government Medical College ; Trivandrum in 1999 when the syllabus and regulations framed with the help of some American Universities got approved by the Board of Studies and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Kerala. It was designed as a post graduate program,but could not be started for some reasons. Later in 2008, the Pharmacy council of India (PCI) managed to introduce both six year regular PharmD and the three year post baccalaureate Pharm.D in the country through a Gazette notification of Government of India dated 16th May 2008. The norms and regulations for Pharm.D program were also prescribed and notified. By 2013 November, the PCI had given approval to over 140 institutions mainly in South Indian States. Only four Government institutions have so far started 13
  13. 13. Pharm.D in India. The Indian Pharm.D needs the care and active involvements of pharmacy practice professionals in its growing stages. Doctor of Pharmacy in India, Genesis of Indian Pharm.D Pharm D course Pharmacy as a profession and as a health care discipline has gone through phenomenal changes and development during the last few decades, at global as well as regional levels. In the past, Pharmacists were known by names like alchemists, apothecaries and compounders. Modern pharmacists are professionally qualified,scientifically trained and technically competent health care professionals knowing the secrets and facts of drugs and medicines. Contemporary pharmacy education is highly scientific and generally students spend 4 to 10 years at University levels to acquire and mould their competency and skills. Pharmacy Practice has a vital role in drug therapy, health care and other related areas.The areas and activities of community pharmacy, hospital pharmacy and clinical pharmacy constitute the various functions of pharmacy practice. The role of modern pharmacist has evolved dramatically from the product (medicine) orientation to patient care outcomes. Independent pharmacies were first established in 12th century in Italy and then in neighboring countries like France and Germany. However pharmacy education at College/ University level started only in 1777 in Paris in France. Later in 1803 six schools of pharmacy were started in France. Private pharmacy educational institutions arose in Bavaria, the south east state It was in 1821 the first American Pharmacy College-Philadelphia College of Pharmacy- admitted the first batch of pharmacy students which was followed by Massachusetts College of Pharmacy (1823) and New York College of Pharmacy (1829). Since then the focus of pharmacy education and pharmacy practice got oriented towards USA Innovations in Pharmacy Practice 14
  14. 14. The post 1920 period, particularly the 1940 to 1970s, witnessed many scientific developments and achievements in the area of Hospital and Clinical Pharmacy in USA. In 1953 Heber .W. Youngken Jr of University of Washington wrote an article entitled "The Washington Experiment- Clinical Pharmacy" in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.Through that article H.W. Youngken brought to the notice of the world pharmacists how Prof. L.Wait Rising of Washington had in 1945-46 initiated a research program in teaching pharmacy students utilizing some of the numerous professional prescriptions in Seattle. It has brought forth a storm of protest from American Association of College of Pharmacy (AACP) and the American Council in Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE) in the 1950s. The term 'Clinical Pharmacy' was not seriously used in any book even in the early 1960's. In 1961 Dr. John Autian at University of Wisconsin used the term 'Clinical Pharmacy' as a proposal to replace 'Compounding and dispensing' and in the same year Dr.Glenn Sperandio coined the term Clinical Pharmacy in American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy in his "Hospital Pharmacy Notes". Dr. Sperandio explained that direct contact with person or persons is the essential of "Clinical" in any specialty. In 1969, Clinical Pharmacy was linked with "patient orientation". Today Clinical Pharmacy denotes the practice of pharmacy near the bed side of the patient and is practiced by both hospital pharmacists and community pharmacists. The first scientific residency program in pharmacy in USA was developed by Harvey A.K. Whitney at University of Michigan hospital in 1927. Due to the innovative thinking of people like Paul F Parker, many clinical pharmacy activities were introduced in pharmacy in the 1960s. Inspired from the success of Whitney’s experiment on Drug Information Center in Michigan University, Paul F Parker opened the first Drug Information Center at a Pharmacy School in 1962. Other Universities like the University of Kentucky had also taken leading roles in developing Clinical Pharmacy programs in the world. The first unit dose distribution program in a hospital set up in USA was initiated at the University of Kentucky in 1965. In 1968 the pharmacy residency program was started at 15
  15. 15. University of Kentucky which helps to award both Pharm.D degree and residency certificates to the students. The introduction of Post graduate programs in hospital pharmacy, clinical pharmacy and starting of Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D) programs contributed positively for the development and popularisation of pharmacy practice in USA and other countries. What is Doctor of Pharmacy or Pharm.D The Doctor of Pharmacy degree, abbreviated as Pharm.D.or Pharm.D,is a professional doctor degree in Pharmacy .It is very much similar to professional degrees like Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) in USA or equal qualifications in other countries. Today Pharm.D became a global program available in all most all countries in the world. The duration of the program varies from five years ( eg. USA, Pakistan) to eight or nine years (eg. Ghana,France) of academic education at the University/ College levels. In some countries like Hungry,Netherland, Portugal etc. It is a post graduate program while in yet other countries Pharm.D is considered as superior to masters qualification and post graduates are admitted to the program. During the last few years ,Pharm. D became popular even in the Middle East countries. Through the Pharm.D programs the pharmacists are trained to become active and integral members of the patient care team. Increasing emphasis on improving quality of medication use and enhancing medication safety have dramatically increased the demand for clinical pharmacy and the Pharm.D program in all parts of the world. The ward rounds, clinical postings, clerkship and the residency are the core components of the Pharm.D program. It is through these the students get accustomed to real hospital practice situation and oriented to the evidence based therapy concepts. The clinical rotations provide students the opportunity to apply knowledge acquired in the classroom to the practice of pharmacy in different patient care settings.The Universities and pharmacy schools through the Pharm.D program prepare pharmacists who can assume expanded responsibilities in the care of 16
  16. 16. patients and assure the provision of rational and effective drug therapy both in public and private set ups. ThePharm.D students are provided with the opportunity to gain experience in patient care in close relationships with health practitioners like physicians, nurses, biochemists,nutritionists and other health care professionals.The Universities conducting the program have to continuously enhance the curriculum with new courseofferings that reflect the pharmacist's importance as a frontline health care provider. Problem- based learning and active exposure to clinical opportunities will help the students attain necessary skills and personalize the education to reflect their individual interests and professional goals. The Pharm.D program combines rigorous basic science education with extensive and varied clinical and pharmacy practice experiences. It helps the graduates to contribute positively for revolutionizing the future of health care through new discoveries and innovations to improve patient lives. The Universities conducting the program have to continuously enhance the curriculum with new course offerings that reflect the pharmacist's importance as a frontline health care provider. The Pharm.D is not equal to doctor of philosophy (PhD) and is intended for people who want to practice as pharmacists. The Pharm.D people are in a better position to pursue for the PhD in matters related to health care and drug therapy aspects compared to Many Colleges and Universities in US and other countries offer a dual Pharm.D /PhD degree program for students with strong interest in research who also want to practice as pharmacists. The Pharm.D curriculum is designed to produce pharmacists who have the abilities and skills necessary to achieve outcomes related to pharmaceutical care to patients, and ensure safe and effective drug therapy with the support of professional pharmaceutical knowledge and information. First Pharm . D Course and its impact in Pharmacy education The Pharm.D program as it is understood and popularized today, originated as an innovation program of University of Southern California (USC) in 1950 as a six year program. The USC is a private research University in USA established in 1880 with its main campus in Los Angeles, California. USC started its first Pharmacy School - USC School of Pharmacy - in Southern California in 1905. 17
  17. 17. The takeoff of the Pharm.D in USA was not smooth and resistance free. It has to face some unfriendly reactions and resistances from certain corners within the country. In 1955, the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) also started Pharm. D and by 1960 many other Universities in USA started Pharm.D. It took about two decades for getting Pharm. D popularized in USA and other parts of the world. Those who opposed the program in the beginning later started welcoming it and by 1970s students from other countries joined the program in large number. In 1973 UCSF started Department of Clinical Pharmacy as an independent unit which was responsible for the development of the first clinical pharmacy curriculum in the world. Today the clinical pharmacy residency program of UCSF is the largest in USA The US authorities adopted Pharm.D as a national professional degree program by 1980s. In 1992, the American Association of College of Pharmacy (AACP) and other pharmacy professional organizations took a joint decision to make Pharm D as the minimum requirement for practice of Pharmacy in USA. The Accreditation Council for Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE), the national organization that accredits pharmacy degree courses, also endorsed the decision. For the next few years they were jointly doing the homework for implementation of the decision. All the existing pharmacists with B.Pharm / B.S and M.Pharm qualifications were provided sufficient opportunities to take Pharm.D through various modules in the 1990s. The Universities framed their own modules for part- time and distance/ e-learning process of Pharm.D for existing licensed pharmacists. Till 1998 both B.S (Pharmacy) and Pharm.D programs of 5 year duration were conducted in America. In 1998 orders were issued to all American Universities to replace their B.S (Pharmacy) and B.Pharm with Pharm.D focusing on clinical and community pharmacy practice. Since the graduating class of 2006, the BS Pharm / B.Pharm degree has been completely replaced by Pharm.D degree in USA ( Carrie 2008). All these developments have positively influenced the pharmacy educational institutions and authorities in other countries in the world to take proper precautions in their education system. Today Pharm.D or its equivalent degree is required to sit for the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX), one component of the licensure process required to practice as a pharmacist in U.S. states Professional status of Pharmacy after Pharm. D 18
  18. 18. The ‘Gallup poll’ in USA is well known among professionals all over the world. It was initiated by George Gallup in 1978 with the objective of evaluating various professions which are supposed to serve humanity in the country. The main question asked to the participants of the Gallup poll is "How would you rate the honesty and ethical standards of people in these different fields?” The Americans rate the honesty and ethical standards of 28 or more professions/ occupations surveyed by the Gallup poll. The pharmacists are ranked in No 1 or No 2 positions among all professionals in USA for the last thirty or more years A similar type of rating known as ‘Morgan poll’ is conducted in Australia since 1994. The Australians too rate their professions based on ethics and honesty. The nursing profession and pharmacy were closely ranked as No 1 and 2 up to 2002. Since then there is always a tight fight between Pharmacy and Nursing for the first position. In Canada in 2012 Pharmacists were ranked at No 1 position among all professionals This is not the case with USA or Australia or Canada alone. Throughout the world where well regulated pharmacy education and practice systems are in existence, pharmacy or pharmaceutical sciences has emerged as a high profile, sought after profession. It is mainly because of the services, innovations and achievements in the areas of hospital, community and clinical pharmacies. Pharmacy education in India The pharmacy education in India is not very old. It was started at the University level only in 1932 in Banaras Hindu University (BHU) by a thirty year old youth, Mahadeva Lal Schroff popularly known as M.L. Schroff. Originally it was a B .Sc. programme and got converted into a B.Pharm course in 1937. Schroff could start pharmacy education in India just because of the encouragement and support he got from Pandit Madan Mohan Malaviya, a national figure who was the The growth of pharmacy education in India was in ‘bonsai style' till 1980s. At the time of independence there were only five pharmacy colleges in the country which increased to 16 by 1967. However during the period 2000 - 2008 hundreds of new pharmacy degree colleges were started in India. The number of degree colleges increased to around 900 by 2009 and by 2013 there are about 1500 pharmacy colleges imparting diploma, degree , M.Pharm, Pharm.D and PhD programs. Only about 15 per cent of the Indian Pharmacy Colleges are 19
  19. 19. situated in the health care campus attached to the hospitals or medical institutions and most of them are in the South Indian states like Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka. Right from 1950s, highly qualified graduate and post graduate pharmacists started working in the hospital pharmacies attached to major hospitals like Medical colleges in India. They were engaged in different teaching positions in the department of pharmacology and were well respected and accepted by the medical professionals in those institutions. In the 1970s, some academicians like Dr.P.C.Dandiya, Professors Gode and Gambir (Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, BHU), Prof. R.D. Kulkarni (Department of Pharmacology, Grant Medical College, Bombay) and Dr.B.D.Miglani (Delhi University) tried to bring the evolution of clinical pharmacy in the West, into the Indian pharmacy profession. However, clinical pharmacy could make an impact in Indian pharmacy only by 1990s. Dr. B.D. Miglani, the father of Indian Hospital Pharmacy and a living giant of pharmacy practice in the country was responsible for starting the first post graduate course in Hospital and Clinical Pharmacy in India in Delhi College of Pharmacy( now known as DIPSAR) in 1984. In 1996 C MC Vellore started a post graduate diploma course in Clinical Pharmacy and in the next year ( 1997) the J.S.S Hospital & College of Pharmacy Mysore started a post graduate programme (M.Pharm) in Pharmacy Practice giving special importance to Clinical Pharmacy. In the next 5 years period, many institutions in India, from various states and Universities, (K.M.College of Pharmacy, Madurai; Periyar College of Pharmacy Trichy; SRIPMS, Coimbatore; JSS Ooty;Govt. Medical College. Trivandrum; Annamalai University, Chidambaram, College of Pharmacy, Manipal; KLE’s College of Pharmacy, Belgaum; Al Ameen College of Pharmacy, Bangalore, Hamdard College of Pharmacy, Delhi, NIPER, Chandigarh etc.) Initiated similar post graduate programmes in Pharmacy Practice. By 2013, there are over 100 institutions in India imparting such programs. The important pharmacy education programs currently offered in India include i)Diploma in pharmacy (D.Pharm, a 2 year program after 10+2) ii)Bachelor of pharmacy (B.Pharm, a 4 year program after 10+2) iii)Master of pharmacy ( M.Pharm, a 2 year program after B.Pharm) 20
  20. 20. iv)Doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D, a 6 year program after 10+2) v)Doctor of Pharmacy ( Pharm.D) P.B. 3 year program after B.Pharm vi)Doctor of philosophy (Ph.D, generally 3 years work after M.Pharm). India is perhaps the only country in the world which is having a diploma course (D.Pharm) as the minimum qualification for registering as a professional pharmacist with the statutory Council or agency for getting approval or license for the practice of pharmacy. Other countries have made degree in pharmacy (B.Pharm /M.Pharm/Pharm.D) as the minimum qualification for the practice of pharmacy. In countries like US, one must have a Pharm D degree and then pass the state pharmacy licensure examination and complete pharmacy internship for a period (500-2000 Hrs. depending upon the individual states) for getting registered as a pharmacist. The pharmaceutical industry in India has attained tremendous growth and development during the last few decades. However the pharmacy practice is only in the developing stage. With growing internationalization of the pharmaceutical industry and the globalization of the pharmacy education program, the standards of pharmacy education and pharmacy practice needs to be of world class standards. Starting of Pharm. D in India The first effort to introduce Pharm.D in India was initiated in Trivandrum Government Medical College in 1999 when the syllabus and regulations framed by K.G.Revikumar , the head of Hospital and Clinical Pharmacy, of the Medical College with the help of some American Universities got approved by the Board of Studies and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Kerala. However the program could not be started as Revikumar was transferred to Calicut Medical College subsequently.It was designed as a post graduate program aimed at moulding a team of young pharmacy practice professionals and teachers Immediately after starting Pharm.D, Annamalai University tried to establish some tie-up with certain American Universities. In February 2009 Dr. James Scott from Western University, California visited Annamalai University to study the situation and the facilities available at the University for running the program. In that connection Dr. Scott visited and studied the facilities in some other centres in south India like Amrita School of Pharmacy (Amrita University, Kochi,Kerala), Alshifa College of Pharmacy (Kerala University of Health 21
  21. 21. Sciences), KLE College of Pharmacy ( KLE University, Belgaum) and Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai. The opportunity to popularise the Pharm.D in India with the help of UGC and AICTE was not exploited and used by PCI. Pharmacy professionals working in public Universities and Govt. institutions are not taking steps to popularise Pharm.D in the country. By 2013 November, the PCI had given approval to over 140 institutions covering states like Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan, UP and Punjab for starting Pharm.D in India. Rajasthan, Punjab and UP have one each, Gujarat two and Maharashtra three colleges. Out of them about 130 have already started the Pharm.D program. However the fact that only four Government institutions - two in Maharashtra, one each in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, have started Pharm.D course. It shows that involvement of government institutions in the course is currently nominal and insignificant. In Maharashtra out of the three PCI approved institutions, two are in government sector one at Aurangabad and another at Amarabati. In Tamil Nadu out of 18 institutions one, Annamalai University, is in Government sector. In Kerala the Pharm.D was not started in Trivandrum Medical College even though they got the PCI approval in 2011. Some Pharmacy teachers propagate the message that it is a program designed for exporting Pharm.Ds to other countries and that it is designed for the rich and affordable sections of society. Table 1:Pharm.D Colleges in India approved by PCI (As on Oct 2013) State Private Colleges Government Colleges Uttar Pradesh 01 NIL promote, popularise, encourage and support public sector institutions to start Pharm.D. The involvement of government institutions is essential in popularising and ensuring job opportunities for Pharm.D in India. After the 16th May 2008 Gazette notification of Pharm.D, PCI invited first applications for starting Pharm.D in India in July 2008 giving just one month time for the institutions to plan and apply for the course. Still they received about 50 applications from pharmacy colleges in states like Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa.Inspections were conducted in August 2008 and in September PCI approved about twenty pharmacy institutions from Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Kerala for starting Pharm.D course from the Subsequently few more institutions were approved for starting the program.Some 22
  22. 22. of them were given the permission to start both Pharm.D and Pharm.D post baccalaureate. given to only such institutions which were conducting B.Pharm course for the previous four years is not a wise subjects (like anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacognosy In some colleges both B.Pharm and Pharm.D classes are clubbed together for certain subjects.There are no specific guidelines for practical, assignments, clerkship, internship and residencies.Hardly 15 per cent of Indian pharmacy colleges are situated in health care campus or attached to a hospital. As per the 2008 Pharm.D Regulations of PCI Pharm.D with 30 students intake. It can be either an own or a ‘rented’ hospital with the support of an MOU. The hospital is needed for providing training, clerkship and residencies for the students. The tie-up or memorandum of undertaking Many Pharm.D colleges use the MOU only for PCI inspection purpose and not for academic activities. Community Pharmacies, Hospital Pharmacies, Clinical Pharmacies, Clinical Research including clinical trials, The Indian community Pharmacies have to be made professional both in outlook and practice. community and hospital pharmacies. Registered pharmacists alone should be given licence and permission to establish and run community pharmacies. The current Pharm.D syllabus and Regulations give very little focus for employability of the graduates coming out of the Universities and schools/colleges of Pharmacy. Those who frame the syllabus and Regulations of a course should be responsible like the parents of well brought up children. Why and for what purpose Pharm.D was introduced in India have to be reflected in the syllabus and Regulation. Students who join the course and spend six years at the universities should be able to contribute positively for the development and In countries where the Pharm.D program is well established and developed, they have by this time established a system for providing clerkship (rotationship), internship, residency and fellowship components of Pharm.D programs. Unfortunately in India no existing facilities are available for such activities and 23
  23. 23. the Pharm.D teachers are not trained or oriented for such works. director, mentor etc. may be new to Indian pharmacy teachers. Students should be lead to where they should be. Both clerkship and residency components of Indian Pharm.D needs to be made more effective to ensure placements in India. Clerkship and residency should help for the acquisition and development of required professional skills. and should be developed as an excellent opportunity to find career path for Pharm.Ds. Many of the students may stick with what they know and believe. However a few will be prompted to step out of their comforts and traditional locations and dare to see a different and challenging side of practice because of Preceptorship and mentoring. Home infusion, geriatric care homes, prison pharmacy, pet animal pharmacy, satellite pharmacies, part-time pharmacies, in the minds of Pharm.Ds during their clerkships, internships and residencies. Mentorship helps to support, inspire, motivate and guide students in both professional and personal growth and developments. Good mentorship is essential to polish the thinking power of students and prompt them for challenging and innovative professional activities. The term Preceptorship is well known to the American Pharmacists and medical doctors right from the beginning of 20th century, though it was introduced in their nursing profession only in late 1970s. However the concept of preceptors and Preceptorship are new to Indian pharmacy education. Preceptorship implies one-to-one teaching leaning relationship involving an experienced preceptor and a novice Preceptor helps the preceptee to connect the link between the theory taught in class rooms and the practice set up in hospitals and communities. Clerkship for obtaining clerical workmanship in pharmacy practice aspects and will be very much useful during residencies. It is not equal to ward rounds or clinical postings. Clerkship is usually done outside own hospital while internship is within the hospital by performing in-house jobs. The clerkship co-ordinator or director will take the students in small groups of 3-5 to other institutions including primary 24
  24. 24. health centres to speciality or superspeciality hospitals and pharmacies during clerkship to acquire the skills for practice in various situations with the support of departmental teachings and discussions.It is not a simple requirement for obtaining a degree.The work hours are that of full time job but with week-end and on-call works as decided by the clerkship director or administrator. Issues like why the student cohort is divided into small groups for clerkship/rotations or who can be appointed as a clerkship administrator/ coordinator or director and what are their duties etc. need to be defined to Indian Pharm.D teachers and students. Problem solving and decision makes skills have to be developed in the students with the support of clerkship and residencies.The course duration has to be re-designated as 5+ 1 = 6years for Pharm.D regular program. Currently it is specified as 6 years. Since the students through P1 to P5 years of study acquire the skills for handing public health, physiological investigations, biochemistry tests, lab data interpretation etc. required for the hospital and community practice situations they can contribute seriously for the hospital health care programs during the general residency in P6. They also have to practice hospital pharmacy and clinical pharmacy in the hospitals. Above all, the P6 Pharm.D have to act as preceptors and guides for all the junior students. If properly utilised, they will be more effective in teaching and training junior students than their teachers.The students have to be paid proper stipend in P6 without charging any tuition fee. For finding suitable jobs in Indian hospitals, the Pharm.D have to be specialised in disciplines like Nephrology and Urology, Psychiatry, Neurology, Oncology, Dermatology, Paediatrics, Endocrinology/ Diabetology etc.so that the concerned medical specialists will seek their support for drug therapy and various clinical studies.The students have to be specialised in the drugs used in those specialities. The pharmaceutical industry in India has attained tremendous growth and development during the last few decades. So also the Pharmacy education. However the pharmacy practice at community and hospital levels are not yet modernized and made professional compared to international standards and practices. The Pharm.D relationship between the pharmacy practice department and the health care 25
  25. 25. professionals in the hospitals and community set ups.The Pharm.D students have to exhibit their calibre, competence and capabilities in making the drug therapy and health care safer, cost- effective and user friendly. In hospitals, the practicing pharmacists, including pharmacy practice teachers, have to work in tandem with other health care professionals.They have to acquire knowledge about other health care professions through interactions, discussions and team work. In spite of the number of deficiencies and weaknesses of the Indian Pharm.D programmes, the experiences of the first 4 or 5 years of Pharm.D in India show that it is a sought after pharmacy course in the country, though currently limited to certain south Indian states. Students brilliant academic background and visions are joining the course The educated classes of people including the NRIs and internet information from across the world help of the profession and the professionals to help them materialise their dreams and lead them to a better tomorrow. They need the leadership by teachers who are good and capable guides, influential mentors and skilled preceptors 26
  26. 26. About the author Samrat Satyarnjan Paul successfully completed Pharm D(PB) course and 1year of internship in the year 2014,from Navodaya Medical Hospital and Research center, Raichur, under RGUHS. He did his schooling from Kendriya Vidyalaya, Surat and passed SSC in 1999 and HSC in 2001. He did his graduation from J.L.Chaturvedi College Of Pharmacy under R.T.M Nagpur University. He passed B.Pharm in 2007. He appeared in many entrance exams in his course of career : PMT, GATE, MHCET, GRE, IELTS. Then in 2010, he took admission in Pharm D(PB) course which was then recently started by PCI. He got lateral entry directly into the 4th year of Pharm D. 27
  27. 27. When in 5th year of Pharm D(PB), he did a six months period project on topic “ Drug Use Evaluation of Antibiotics used in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital”, which was accepted in 64 IPC (INDIAN PHARMACEUTICAL CONGRESS) for poster presentation. He presented his own research paper titled “ Drug Use Evaluation of Antibiotics used in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital” in 64 IPC. th th 28
  28. 28. He has publications in scientific journals: 2. “Study on prescribing and administration of therapeutic aerosols in pediatric pulmonary disease at a private tertiary care teaching hospital” in International Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences, IJPBS July-Sept 2013: 3(3); 455-461 29
  29. 29. He is a registered pharmacist under Gujarat State Pharmacy Council. He is also a member of IPA (INDIAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION). 30
  30. 30. WORK EXPERIENCE: After he graduated in B.Pharm, he worked in Multinational Pharmaceutical Corporate Companies like Pfizer and Ranbaxy in their Sales department and promoted their brand products. Job description : Detailing of Higher Antibiotics and other drugs to Physicians and General Practitioners, their uses, advantages, side effects, drug interactions, precautions, relevant clinical trials occurred and their significance etc, (Antibacterials - Clarithromycin, Azithromycin, Clindamycin and other competitor molecules); Painkillers like Piroxicam and competitors like Diclofenac and Aceclofenac; novel molecule like Vernaciline tartarate ; cough syrups; Antidepressants like Sertraline Job description : associated with various activities like- detailing to doctors and physicians the profiling of cardiac and diabetic products(medicines), mainly drugs which belong to classes like Antihypertensives (Olmesartan, Nebivolol), Alpha- glucosidase inhibitors (Voglibose), Biguanides (Metformin), Diuretics (Torsemide, Hydrochlorthiazide), HMG CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Atorvastatin), Fibric Acid derivative (Fenofibrate) and also the others that belong to other relatively pitted- against drugs or classes of drugs; conducting Diabetic Detection Camps ( blood glucose test and HbA1c test) and Lipid Profile Testing camps in association with doctors and physicians; conducting Outpatient department (OPD) camps and Continuous Medical education (CME) programs in association with doctors and 31
  31. 31. physicians, dealing with retailers (medical stores), stockiest and Carry Forwarding Agency (CFA). He got an appraisal letter for his outstanding performance for the month of May 2010 with over 110% achievement, on 7 June 2010, from Mr. Yugal Sikri, Country Head, India Region, Ranbaxy Labs Ltd. After he completed his post graduation in Pharm D(PB), he worked in Medical Coding sector like Medusind Solutions as a Content Analyst and also did outsourcing job . 3) Company :Medusind Solutions Duration : 13 Aug 2014 to present Job description : Content Analyst Pharmacotherapeutics, Patient Counselling , Clinical Research, Pharmacovigilance and Applied Clinical Pharmacokinetics. He is devoted to make the concept of practicing clinical pharmacist a reality and promote pharmacist as an active and important health care professional. Pharmacists Care, no matter where!!! Achievements 1 Participated in Intercollegiate Debate Competition held by Indian Pharmaceutical Association. th 32
  32. 32. 2 Got an appraisal letter for my performance for the month of May 2010 with over 110% achievement, on 7th June 2010, from Mr. Yugal Sikri, Country Head, India Region, Ranbaxy Labs Ltd. 3 Attended 62nd and 64th Indian Pharmaceutical Congress held at Manipal University, Manipal and SRM University, Chennai respectively. 4 Presented poster of my own research paper titled “ Drug Use Evaluation of Antibiotics used in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital” in 64th IPC 5 Attended National Seminar on “Recent trends in Clinical Research and Drug Discovery” held at Oxford College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru 6 Attended National Seminar on “Recent trends in Clinical Research and Drug Discovery” held at KL College of Pharmacy, Bagalkot. 7 Attended seminar on “ Pharmacovigilance”, organized by Abott Pharmaceutical Company at NMCH and RC, Raichur. 8 Attended National Seminar on " Pharmaceutical Quality by design(QbD): Product and Process Development" organized by dept. of Pharmaceutics, NET Pharmacy College, Raichur. 33
  33. 33. career options for those with a degree in Pharmacy Most of us think of pharmacists as the persons who are behind the counter when we go to a drug store with a prescription. While retail pharmacy is a common career choice for pharmacists, there are many other options available to those who have completed their Pharm.D degree and the necessary licensure requirements. Although there are a variety of practice settings, compensation remains relatively consistent across all of these employment options with minor variations according to hours of work and call. Retail Pharmacy/ Chemists A pharmacist in medical retail store prepares and dispenses drugs on prescription to the general consumer. With the growing availability of pre-packaged doses, the pharmacists now monitor the drug sale on the basis of prescriptions and dosage and give over-the-counter advice on how to use the prescribed drugs. In the retail sector pharmacists run chemist's shops. As medical representatives, they inform and educate medical practitioners about the potential uses of the drug or health product and its administration along with the side effects or precautions for its use. The job entails regular visits to medical practitioners, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, health centres. There is usually a lot of touring to be done in this case. Hospital Pharmacy 34
  34. 34. The primary role of a hospital pharmacist is to provide medication and medication management services to patients who are hospitalised or are visiting hospital- based clinics, and to provide medication services to health professionals who care for patients in the hospital set up. Hospital pharmacists have exposure to many complicated and unique therapy needs, including intravenous medication therapy, nutrition, and the specific needs of newborns and the elderly. Pharmacists in the practice find working with other health professionals, work variety and focused clinical care opportunity rewarding. This is the second most common practice area. Industrial Pharmacy While most firms are involved in the production of pre-formulated preparations, a growing number of firms are developing new formulations through autonomous research work. Industrial pharmacists carry out clinical trials, where drugs are tested for safety and effectiveness work in research and development to develop new formulations the production job entails management and supervision of the production process, packaging, storage and delivery work in marketing, sales and quality control. In addition to the many opportunities for graduates in the many areas of pharmacy practice there are increasing numbers of opportunities within the pharmaceutical industry in advanced and specialised areas, as the depth and breadth of education in pharmacy increases opportunities in industry. This includes the promotion of pharmaceuticals to health professionals, marketing, 35
  35. 35. development of new drugs and dosage forms, clinical studies in patients, monitoring pharmaceutical use on a population scale, and managing regulatory and legal issues. Government Services Pharmacists are hired within the central and state government departments - the Health Protection Branch of the Department of Health and Welfare, the Pest Control Division of Agriculture, the Department of National Defense, Provincial Research Councils, and the Provincial Departments of Agriculture or Environment. There are employment opportunities available also within the food and cosmetic industries or within any other industry that requires an assurance that new products are as safe and effective as possible. In government departments, a pharmacist maintains proper records according to various Acts governing the profession. Pharmaceutical Education Many pharmacists work as faculty in colleges of pharmacy. These pharmacists enjoy influencing the future of pharmacy by educating future pharmacists and may participate in direct patient care and/or scientific research as well. Academic pharmacist practice has its rewards in disseminating and discovering new ideas that change medication use, pharmacist practices and healthcare policy. Career as a teacher is satisfying as it allows interaction with people, especially students, and provides them with the flexibility to pursue their own ideas in the field. Nuclear Pharmacy 36
  36. 36. Nuclear pharmacists are responsible for measuring and delivering radioactive materials which are used in digital imaging (MRI, CT, etc) and other procedures in medical offices and hospitals. Due to the nature of the radioactive materials and how they are handled, nuclear pharmacists are typically required to start each work day very early, sometimes pre-dawn, as the radioactive materials must be delivered within a few hours of their use, or they lose their effectiveness Clinical Research Recently, Clinical research has also opened its door for B.Pharma graduates as medical underwriter, CRO, data validation associate, clinical research associate etc. A clinical research associate plays an important role in monitoring and overseeing the conduct of clinical trials, which are conducted on healthy human volunteers. They have to see that the trials meet the international guidelines and the national regulatory requirements. The primary role of a community pharmacist is to provide medication and medication related services to patients. In most settings, pharmacists provide prescription drug services to their community of patients, working with the patients and a broad spectrum of healthcare providers to achieve the best possible healthcare outcome of medication. Quality Control & analysis A pharmacy graduate can play a crucial role in controlling product quality as an analytical chemist or a quality control manager. The Drug and the Cosmetics Act (1945), Rules 71(1) and 76(1) says that the manufacturing activity should be taken up under the supervision of a technical man whose qualification should be B PharmA, B Sc, B Tech or medicine with Bio-Chemistry. Research and Development New and expanding knowledge in healthcare and biomedical sciences provides tremendous opportunities for the pursuit of research careers for pharmacists. Graduates with Pharm.D degree can pursue a research career directly or go in for additional education either in the form of residency and fellowship training or in formal graduate programmes leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. 37
  37. 37. With a clinical focus one can be involved in the conduct and analysis of large-scale human drug studies in academic, industrial, and governmental settings. Pharmacists are also highly qualified to pursue additional training in business, public health, or pharmaceutical socioeconomics in order to become involved in research in drug utilisation, healthcare outcomes, and the provision of pharmacy services. Sales and Marketing Ambitious achievers with pleasant personality and good communication skills can opt for the job of Medical Sales Representative. Companies prefer pharmacy graduates for this job, as they have a good knowledge about the drug molecules, their therapeutic effects and the drug -drug interactions. 38
  38. 38. Changing Trends in Global Pharmacy Workforce INTRODUCTION Increased demand for health services and increasing expectations to service delivery have a significant effect in shaping work dynamics.Contemporary issues surrounding the global pharmacy workforce identified from the literature's include the importance of working conditions and job satisfaction, wide range of supply and demand factors affecting the workforce and migrations.To support growth in the establishment of pharmacy practice and its aspiration for increased patient focused care, work force needs another trends will need to be factored into pharmaceutical service development plans. Global Policy Context The world’s health workforce is facing significant challenges with a shortage of more than FOUR million health workers worldwide. The global health workers crisis is possibly the greatest health system constraint on countries seeking to meet their 2015 millennium development goals (MDGs). Increased demand for health services and increasing expectations for service delivery has changed the health 39
  39. 39. workforce issues have generated huge interest and international action to bring about change. -World health report 2006 In order to meet the MDGs, had laid revolutionary change in every sector of healthcare system in accelerating, delivering and planning the future health care professional not only to national needs but also to global health innovations. In many countries, pharmacists are the most accessible of all health care workers and a such play a key role in the delivery of health care services, particularly the safe distribution of medicines at all levels. In an era of rapidly accelerating change in health care delivery, the roles of pharmacists are constantly being redefined, as roles, competency, and training requirements change.Thus, understanding the current workforce and the factors that influence it are key components to human resource planning in pharmacy. As the recent report from the Office of The Chief Pharmacist of US, a health system improvement that is well supported by the evidence-base is to maximize the expertise and scope of pharmacists in minimize expansion barriers for an already existing and successful upgrading the health care delivery models in USA, Canada, Australia and Great Britain. There is also a need for countries to model their workforce needs based on predicted future provision of services and care, roles and responsibilities of the pharmacy support workforce, increased use of technology, the advancement of biotechnology and personalized medicine, demographic changes, and future patterns of working all while ensuring there is a sustainable academic workforce to maintain the supply of suitably trained pharmacists. Work Condition & Job Satisfaction The level of job satisfaction among pharmacy personnel is an important indicator of staff turnover and retention. A number of studies found female pharmacists hold high levels of job satisfaction compared with their male counterparts.Other factors identified as increasing pharmacist retention were good remuneration, good relationships with co-workers, and flexible schedules. Factors increasing staff turnover included high stress, insufficient or unqualified staff, and poor salary.Evidence also suggests that pharmacists engaged in shift work might present unique characteristics, which has implications for labour supply and pharmacy services delivery. Workforce development: Education, training, & leadership Continuing professional development (CPD) has the potential to be useful in pharmacy workforce revalidation. Pharmacy professionals on the whole agreed with the principle of engaging with CPD, but there was little evidence to suggest 40
  40. 40. widespread and wholehearted acceptance and uptake of CPD, essential for revalidation.Direct experience of effective CPD in the absence of perceived barriers could impact personal and professional development and patient benefit, thus strengthening personal beliefs in the value of CPD. Supply and demand issues: Current status & future directions Increased demand and limited supply of pharmacists constrains the ability of the workforce to expand. Many different supply and demand factors that influence the pharmacy profession were identified, the majority of which were common to most countries. Supply and demand issues: Current status & future directions The most common factors increasing demand for pharmacists were increased feminisation, increased clinical governance measures through continually reviewing and improving the quality of patient care, increased numbers of prescriptions, and increased complexity of medication therapy. The most common factors mitigating demand for pharmacists included increased use of technology, expansion in the numbers and roles of pharmacy technicians, and increased numbers of pharmacy graduates. Pharmacy workforce migration There is greater migration from less-developed countries to more-developed countries. The pharmacist workforce from African and Asian countries was disproportionately affected by migration. Significant number of pharmacists from developing countries migrate to the developed world; however, the extent of such migration was not properly captured. Postulated reasons for migration include better remuneration, joining or supporting family, political and social instability, poor living conditions, poor working conditions and management, unsafe environment, further training and qualifications, and job opportunities and satisfaction. Conclusion The current challenges affecting the global pharmacy workforce in ensuring equitable access and responsible use of safe, effective and quality medicines. The present status states that there is a huge paradigm shift from the past to current Pharmacy profession leading in the developed countries for more advancement and the developing countries upgrading for the better services with new branches in managing future needs in delivering of the health services. But still many skillful pharmacists are needed to strengthen the workforce in the Global Pharmacy. Source: Global workforce Report 2012 41
  41. 41. 42
  42. 42. why one should consider Pharm D programme? Different people have different career dreams. Just like any other career, pharmacy is not as easy as it seems. This is especially considering the fact that you will have to work really hard first before you can get your degree. Nevertheless, it is correct to say that every moment of it is worth your effort. This is because pharmacy offers you a wide range of career opportunities in the different health sectors. Pharm.D simply refers to a six year doctorate program in pharmacy. Different countries have different policies and in some countries this is considered as a first professional doctorate degree in pharmacy and the grandaunts can be given the license to exercise their profession. The health care industry is very vital. A doctor of pharmacy is intended to prepare the students for different responsibilities as pharmaceutical care, research, pharmaceutical science and health policy and management among others. With the many job opportunities contracted for this career, it is correct to say that the Pharm.D programs are one of the most marketable syllabuses globally. Positions are usually available in research facilities in different universities, 43
  43. 43. hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, government agencies and advisory boards among many other places. Such programs will usually differ from the regular PhD which is usually theoretical to a research based degree. You can get your doctorate in pharmacy from the different universities across the globe. While a simply degree in pharmacy is acceptable, today, more and more people would prefer to graduate with a Doctors in pharmacy especially due to the tight competition in the career opportunities available. A Pharm.D degree is intended to equip you with all the knowledge necessary for any pharmaceutical field of practice. What is more, students are also endowed with the necessary health care skills which are going to come in handy once they start practicing. 44
  44. 44. Pharm D the No. 1 employer in Medical Research !!! OR Ideally it should be Pharmaceutical Research. The pharmacy community contributes to biomedicine at multiple levels including education, scholarly activity, and service through patient care. Pharm.D have a broad base of knowledge in pharmacology, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, pharmacotherapy, pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomics, as well as a strong understanding of human metabolism, transport, and elimination. Because of significant interest in clinical research questions related to drug development and therapeutics, the field of pharmacy is in a unique position to conduct research toward achieving the goal of individualized prescription drug therapy. With the ability to envision translational endpoints, Pharm.D is a valuable component of the current biomedical research enterprise. Pharmaceutical scientists can offer unique perspectives to clinical and translational research, such as introducing and integrating pharmacogenomic approaches and methods to clinical trials in various disease areas. In addition, Pharm.D researchers can play an important bridging role between clinical investigators who may not otherwise find each other. Broad training in physiology and drug metabolism enables Pharm.D scientists to pursue research interests in a range of therapeutic areas, including but not limited to oncology, cardiology, HIV/AIDS, liver disease, and health services research. Pharmaceutical scientists that are currently conducting studies in these areas provided brief accounts of their research, described their own career paths, and offered suggestions on strengthening the Indian Pharm.D researcher pipeline. Despite a wide range of individual career trajectories, these successful pharmaceutical researchers all viewed certain characteristics of their training as pivotal to their becoming productive, independent scientists. These include i) high- quality mentoring, ii) grant-writing education and experience, iii) exposure to rigorous research, and iv) clinical acumen acquired through practice experience. Leading pharmaceutical scientists have followed diverse paths to yield successful research careers 45
  45. 45. Historically, most of the trailblazers in pharmacy research discovered their interest and compatibility with scientific investigation relatively late in the game. Most reported that they turned to research after realizing that manufacturing & dispensing alone was not sufficient to hold their interest. Many also were dissatisfied with the lack of a literature basis for pharmacy practice. Once these investigators chose to pursue a research career, a common thread to their eventual success was the significant value of mentoring (occasionally from outside the profession). Whether on-site or from a distance, mentoring is an essential component of the professional development of junior investigators. Through continual nurturing from experienced investigators, junior scientists acquire the necessary professional skills for succeeding in research, such as grant-writing and manuscript preparation. Mentoring Pharm.D students from current level should also include a focus on raising awareness about clinical research opportunities and play their role in interpreting the research. Pharm.D aspirants have a wide range of research exposure and career interests in academia and industry Some students plan to pursue Ph.D. after earning their Pharm.D degree, whereas others obtain research experience through some type of post graduate diploma in research after receiving a Pharm.D degree. There is some debate about the value of each type of training approach in our country, but general consensus exists that when it comes to training, one size does not fit all. Speakers agreed that a solid basic science education and meaningful clinical experience were both important ingredients of a successful pharmacy researcher. For those students who focus on research, individual preference as well as research interest and skills will influence whether that graduate suits his employment in academia, industry, or other venues such as the government. One reality is money: Every graduate who had the thought to accumulate into the industry 46
  46. 46. after his Pharm.D degree will find a high-paying position in industry in future. It is also important to recognize that emerging Pharm.D graduates will surely draw their importance and contribution to industry irrespective of other concerns. Pharm.D's had the opportunity to play key leadership roles in contract research organizations (CROs), pharmacovigilance, health policy makers, pharmaceutical firms, and biotechnology companies in their careers. 47
  47. 47. THE STRUGGLE Whims of my mind: Why is it so that in India, the Pharm D course has been initially started in South Indian states only? So many regulatory bodies and governing bodies in pharmacy education PCI(Pharmacy Council Of India) and AICTE(All India Council for technical education) are the governing bodies in the pharmacy education , keeping in mind the compounding and dispensing as well as the technical aspects involved in Pharmaceutical Engineering . Now with the advent of Pharm D course in pharmacy, which is clinically oriented 6 years course in pharmacy and the syllabus is designed such as first 3 years are same as B.Pharm ( compounding and dispensing oriented) and next 2 years are same as MD Pharmacology (medically and clinically oriented) and 1 year of internship in an attached (minimum- 300 beded) hospital , one may expect MCI (medical council of India) to get into the thick of the matters. As it requires an affiliation with a hospital( minimum 300 beded), to get approval for an pharmaceutical institute from PCI to conduct the course , one must expect MCI(medical council of India) also to get involved as a regulatory and governing body. PCI governs courses like : D.Pharm B.Pharm Pharm D and Pharm D(PB) AICTE governs courses like : B.Pharm( jointly with PCI) M.Pharm Now one must expect PCI and MCI may jointly govern Pharm D and Pharm D(PB) 48
  48. 48. But no, its not a rational thinking on my part. MCI will get involve only when the course is a medical one or may be when the professional doctor is dealing with a body part. So, its fair enough that MCI is not involved into these matters. Is Pharm D or PharmD(PB) is a professional doctorate degree or an academic doctorate degree? This source of notification seems to be quite authentic:Check it out!!! To All Universities. Sub: Clarification on Pharm.D qualification. Sir/Madam With reference to the subject cited above, I directed to inform that subject cited issue was considered by the 88th /CC in its meeting held in August, 2011 & decided to forward a clarification to all universities that Pharm.D is a PG qualification and passed out students can directly register for Ph.D. This is for information. Yours faithfully Sd/- (ARCHNA MUDGAL) Registrar-cum-Secretary Nav/14- However tangentile feeling is as if its a UG course and a professional doctorate. I think this should be done" A bridge course for connecting Pharm D and MBBS" I think this should be done : " A bridge course for connecting Pharm D and MBBS". This shall allow to produce talents and experts who have amalgamated, comprehensive knowledge of all the 3 most important aspects of healthcare which are medicine( for diagnosis of disease), pharmacy( for authentic knowledge of medications for prescription writing) and surgery (of course for operations). This has to definitely improve and enhance quality of patient-care manyfolds . Why we shall always follow USA or western setups of education and service systems? They are good no doubt, as they are rich countries with large budgets for healthcare; but sometimes we must take initiatives and become leaders and 49
  49. 49. provide path-breaking or a new-path setting grounds for others to follow. Therefore I wrote a mail to secretory of MCI (secretary@mciindia.org), requesting for the same. It goes as follows: Respected Sir/Madam, I am currently pursuing 2nd year of PharmD (Post baccalaureate), which is a relatively a new curriculum started by PCI since 2008 and which is clinically oriented pharmacy. Up till now pharmacy in India was industry oriented i.e. pharmacist was more into manufacturing,sales,research of discovery of novel molecules and invention of formulations etc.But now with the advent of PharmD, it has become clinically oriented i.e. now a pharmacist is given an opportunity, allowed and equipped to play a role in direct patient care, giving pharmaceutical care. Madam, PharmD syllabus framed by PCI contains many pharmacy related subjects along with the subjects which are present in common in both MBBS and PharmD curriculum, i.e. subjects like anatomy and physiology (a lot lesser of it is there in PharmD), Pathophysiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Biopharmaceutics (a lot more of it is there in PharmD). Madam, I have a great respect for MBBS course and for physicians and surgeons. And I am currently 29 year old man. This is to ask you whether its feasible/ possible that a new course/curriculum may be framed and started by MCI within two to three years, which can bridge this gap between PharmD and MBBS.That is, a bridge-course(of 3years duration) which shall allow a PharmD graduate to be certified as MBBS,upon successfully completion of such a course. This may bring a new input, perspective and vision in patient care, to MBBS/physician as well as provide an opportunity, encourage, help fulfil dreams and strong aspirations of human beings like me, who wish to study such a curriculum, get a medical license, be a physician and earnestly want to play that very role in the healthcare system, at this stage and age of our lives. May all this come into effect for the 2014-2015 session. Hoping for an encouraging, enlightening and positive reply on this request from you. Yours truly, Samrat Paul 50
  50. 50. another letter in the scheme of things- further To DATE: 27/03/2012 PLACE:RAICHUR The Registrar, Rajiv Gandhi University Of Health Sciences,Karnataka Bangalore, Subject:Immediate attention for correction & inclusion of subjects for pharm D (PB) course-reg Through: The Principal, N.E.T Pharmacy College Raichur. Respected Sir, We are the Pharm-D(Post Baccalautreate) students(2010-2013) pursuing the course from NET Pharmacy College Raichur under RGUHS. According to Pharm-D (Post Baccalaureate) regulations 2008 mentioned in RAJIV GANDHI UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES, Karnataka, the scheme of Examination for Pharm-D(Post Baccalaureate) Course, given in page no. 4,the subject Hospital and Community pharmacy(serial no.1.5) is already mentioned to be included in the First Year(Fourth year of Pharm-D course). But instead the above subject, Biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics(serial no. 4.5) has been included, as given in table (First year Post baccalaureate-Fourth year of Pharm-D course) on page no.2. This is to inform you that, at our B.Pharm syllabus under various Universities we didn’t had subjects of Hospital & Community Pharmacy, and Pathophysiology. These subjects are the basic and fundamental subjects for a Pharm-D(PB) course, upon which other subjects are based e.g.: Pharmacotherapeutics I,II,and III are related with Pathophysiology. Though these subjects are included in the Pharm D(6yr-regular) university syllabus in 2nd year, where as these are not included in Pharm D(PB) RGUHS syllabus. Sir, this is to bring to your notice that these above subjects are very important for an aspirant clinical pharmacist to understand the basics and are the essence of the Pharm D(PB) course. All of us students of Pharm D(PB) also had not studied either of these two subjects or one or none in our B.Pharm syllabus under our respective universities. Sir, without having these 2 basic clinically oriented subjects 51
  51. 51. (1.Hospital&Community Pharmacy) and 2. Pathophysiology our course wont be valid and valued. We request you to kindly consider our appeal and make suitable amendments in the existing Pharm.D(PB) Syllabus by adding these 2 basic subjects, effective from this academic year, so that we all Pharm D(PB) students may cover all the required core subjects under our syllabus which will enable us to be at par with Pharm D(6yr-regular) students who already have these subjects in their syllabus. This may also enable us to be eligible for appearing in competitive exams at international level. Hence we shall get better jobs and opportunities globally. We hope our request will be considered favorably and implemented at the earliest. Thanking You, Yours Sincerely, Pharm D(Post Baccalaureate) students, 2010-13 batch N.E.T PC Raichur. ENCLOSURES: 1. List of Pharm D(PB) students of N.E.T Pharmacy College, who completed B.Pharm . from various universities (including RGUHS) with subjects not studied in their B.Pharm. 2. The remarks of our faculty on addition of subjects in Pharm D(PB) syllabus. . 3. FPGEC bulletin 2011. Copy to: 1. Dean, Faculty Of Pharmacy, RGUHS, Bangalore. . 2. Chairman; BOS, Faculty Of , RGUHS, Bangalore. RGUHS must add these basic,fundamental,core,clinically oriented subjects 5 out of 7 PharmD(PB) students in my class in NET Pharmacy college, Raichur under RGUHS didnt had pathophysiology in their B.Pharm and which is still missing in our Pharm D(PB) syllabus. all us students come from background of B.pharm from different PCI recognised colleges from different universities like RTM Nagpur University, Nagarjuna (ANU),Osmania, and Jaipur. And all of us 7 students didnt had Community Pharmacy and same goes missing from our Pharm D(PB) syllabus. Also same is the case with Hospital pharmacy. this subject has also not been in the syllabus of many of the students. If these fundamental,core, and clinically oriented subjects are not included in our 52
  52. 52. syllabus atleast by 2nd year of our Pharm D(PB) syllabus, then we will be the sufferers. PCI and RGUHS are equally responsible for PharmD and PharmD(PB) as well  request additions in Pharm D(PB) syllabus Samrat Paul final draft which we are posting to PCI To DATE: 03/06/2011 The Registrar, Rajiv Gandhi University Of Health Sciences, Bangalore, ... Subject: Request for additions in Pharm. D(Post Baccalaureate) syllabus. Through: The Principal, N.E.T Pharmacy College Raichur. Respected Sir, We are the Pharm D(PB) students pursuing the course from NET Pharmacy College Raichur under RGUHS. We did our B.Pharm course from various universities (including RGUHS). This is to inform you that in our B.Pharm syllabus under various Universities we didn’t had subjects of Pathophysiology, Hospital Pharmacy & Community Pharmacy. These subjects are the basic and fundamental subjects for a Pharm D course, upon which other subjects are based e.g.: Pharmacotherapeutics I,II,and III are related with Pathophysiology. Though these subjects are included in the Pharm D(6yr) university syllabus in 2nd year, where as these are not included in Pharm D(PB) RGUHS syllabus. Sir, this is to bring to your notice that these subjects are very important for an aspirant clinical pharmacist to understand the basics and are the essence of the Pharm D and Pharm D(PB) course. Moreover, considering the above facts, few deemed universities have placed these subjects in their current syllabus of Pharm D (PB) with Hospital and Community Pharmacy clubbed as a single subject. So that students who take admission in these universities for pursuing Pharm D(PB) after completion of their B.Pharm course from other universities, get a chance to study these subjects, 53
  53. 53. give exams and hence get certified by them.See More All of us students of Pharm D(PB) also had not studied either of these three subjects or two or none in our B.Pharm syllabus under our respective universities. Even B.Pharm syllabus of RGUHS has kept these subjects optional (Hospital Pharmacy, Community Pharmacy). So those B.Pharm students of RGUHS who opted oth...er subjects rather than above two mentioned subjects in their course , won’t get an opportunity to study these subjects if they choose to pursue Pharm D (PB) course after the completion of their B.Pharm from our University .Sir, we request you to please add these three subjects atleast in Pharm D(PB)2nd yr syllabus before we PASS OUT by 2013. Also FPGEC Application bulletin 2011 made it clear that they will certify Pharm D(PB) students only under limited circumstances where the degree obtained and coursework completed to obtain the degree satisfactorily show that the candidate obtained experience in patient care in a clinical pharmacy practice setting, on a case by case basis, after they are assured that the student has got good exposure in a good clinical set up, by looking into the transcripts. Consideration of post baccalaureate degrees and whether they may be applicable to determine the minimum required curriculum length will be made on a case-by-case basis at the sole discretion of the FPGEC(copy enclosed). Sir, without having these 3 basic clinically oriented subjects (1. Pathophysiology and 2. Hospital & Community Pharmacy clubbed as single subject) and the respective practicals in hospital and community pharmacy, in the RGUHS syllabus of Pharm D (PB), there are rare chances for Pharm D(PB) students of RGUHS being certified by FPGEC. T...herefore we may not be approved to appear for competitive exams like FPGEE, Naplex etc. We request you to kindly consider our appeal and make suitable amendments in the existing Pharm.D(PB) Syllabus by adding these 3 basic subjects, effective from the academic year 2011 – 12, so that we all Pharm D(PB) students may cover all the required core subjects under our syllabus which will enable us to be at par with Pharm D(6yr) students who already have these subjects in their syllabus. This may also enable us to be eligible for appearing in competitive exams at international level. Hence we shall get better jobs and opportunities globally. We hope our request will be considered favorably and implemented at the earliest. Thanking You, Yours Sincerely, 54
  54. 54. Pharm D(PB) students, 2010-11 batch N.E.T PC Raichur.See More ENCLOSURES: 1. List of Pharm D(PB) students of N.E.T Pharmacy College, who completed B.Pharm . from various universities (including RGUHS) with subjects not studied in their B.Pharm. 2. The remarks of our faculty on addition of sub...jects in Pharm D(PB) syllabus. . 3. FPGEC bulletin 2011. Copy to: 1. Dean, Faculty Of Pharmacy, RGUHS, Banglore. . 2. Chairman; BOS, Faculty Of , RGUHS, Banglore.See More   rubbish from PCI: why one must correlate internship fees issue with stipend to interns issue? Ref. No. 14-218/2013-PCI/80899-81004 Dated:28 feb, 2013 ALL INSTITUTIONS APPROVED BY PCI FOR THE CONDUCT OF PHARM. D / PHARM. D (P.B) COURSE. Sub.: Stipend for Pharm. D Students during internship. Sir/Madam With reference to the subject cited above, it is stated that there have been a strong demand from the students undergoing Pharm D course that they should be paid Stipend during the 6th year (internship) and in case Stipend is not paid they may be exempted from payment of fee during the internship period. It is requested that your comments on the above demand may be sent to this council within 15 days to examine the matter further. Yours faithfully Sd/- (ARCHNA MUDGAL) Registrar-cum- This letter/ common circular from PCI is rubbish.This is so confusing- first of all the institutions should not expect fees for the internship year, which is a customary thing for other healthcare courses: may it be medical, dental, physiotherapy or nursing students- no body pays for the internship year. So why should one must co- relate the internship year fee with the stipend? Both are 55
  55. 55. totally different things and un related. A Pharm D student must get stipend and must not be forced to give the fee for the Intenship year. This is so wrong!!! I just wonder Whats the poor status of an organization like PCI- it simply has no authority or upperhand over its approved institutions. It actually doesnt has any control over these institutions.   Everything regarding PCI's Pharm D course is confusing and wrong- no following of customary things and common morality According to a recent common circular to all pharmaceutical institutions by PCI registrar, which says and demands a report from all institutions about a strong demand from Pharm D students regarding providing stipend. This circular from PCI demands a report from its affiliated institutes within 15 days on :"either the institutions provide stipend to the Pharm D interns or should return the Internship year's fee to the student" . This is so confusing- first of all the institutions should not expect fees for the internship year, which is a customary thing for other healthcare courses: may it be medical, dental, physiotherapy or nursing students- no body pays for the internship year. So why should one must co- relate the internship year fee with the stipend? Both are totally different things and un related. A Pharm D student must get stipend and must not be forced to give the fee for the Intenship year. This is so wrong!!! I just wonder Whats the poor status of an organization like PCI- it simply has no authority or upperhand over its approved institutions. It actually doesnt has any control over these institutions. Pharm D(PB) syllabus phewwwwwwwwwwww!!!!!!!!!!!! Just few days back PCI inspection took place in our college ie in NET Pharmacy College,Raichur. We got the opportunity to have a talk about PharmD(PB) syllabus problems with the PCI Inspector Dr.Abhay Dharamsi-Principal Atmiya Sarvoday Kelavani Samaj Sanchalit Institute Of Pharmacy,Rajkot.We even shown him the letter we wrote to the Registrar, Dean and Chairman of RGUHS and same we sent to PCI President Dr. B.Suresh. When we discussed that how these problems have evolved because of non- 56
  56. 56. uniformity of B.Pharm syllabus among all over the different universities of india.To this , he responded by remarking that PCI is only responsible for D.Pharm, PharmD, and PharmD(PB)courses and not for B.Pharm and M.Pharm courses, whereas B.Pharm and M.Pharm courses are responsibility of AICTE. Further he added that Pharmacy in India have many fathers and thats why all these problems came into existence. When we asked him what should be our set of line of action, in order to solve our syllabus issues, he replied that our direct approach and all communications about this issue should be with first the owner or management of the respective college and finally with RGUHS university, as University has the power to add the required subjects but not delete the subjects in a course.Also he said that even if this requires the university to add, and the students to study additional 6 months or 1 year, to cover these subjects in their syllabus, Pharm D(PB) students should be mentally prepared and ready for the same as those 6 months or 1 year will make their future years of their long career and life smooth and comfortable. Same was conyeved to us by our Principal Dr H. Doddaya long back ago.They both said these additions must be done so as we students become effective and competitive clinical pharmacists. My personal take on this issue is that if PCI has started Pharm D(PB) course and consider itself morally responsible for the good future and careers of the students who are pursuing this course than it must see to it that PB syllabus in RGUHS is upto the mark and those who will pass this course will be certified rationally only after they have studied and appeared for exams in all the basic and core subjects like (Pathophysiology,Hospital Pharmacy and community Pharmacy),despite AICTE related hurdles, because a genuine and legal father should always feel concern about his children.And ofcourse we NET Pharm D(PB)students dont mind continuing our study for additional 6 months or 1 year,if the additions are made as soon as possible ,in effect for 2011-2012.I hope and believe other Pharm D(PB) students from other colleges under RGUHS, also dont mind the same. Also such requests and letters must come from other PharmD(PB)colleges .Another thing is that it would be a lot more easier and convenient for Bangalore PharmD(PB)students to go and communicate directly and frequently with the chairman, dean (faculty of Pharmacy, RGUHS) rather than NET students, Raichur to do the same. So I request Pharm D(PB)students of colleges of bangalore to please do the same. The issue of Pharm D and Pharm D(PB) syllabus 57
  57. 57. Even we are trying to put this issue infront of other principals and students of other Pharm D(PB) colleges so that they may also write and demand for the same.We are sending mails to as many of them as we can. You see right now not many people are aware of the issue and the consequences. And yes, its not all about American dream(though it counts),...The main issue is that the syllabus of Pharm D(PB)course is lacking the core,basic, clinically oriented subjects like Pathophysiology, Hospital Pharmacy and community Pharmacy under RGUHS.Pharm D and Pharm D(PB) is all about clinical orientation isn't it? As we mentioned in our letter to Registrar RGUHS,Pharmacotherapeutics I,II,III subjects are based upon Pathophysiology. However PCI should not be excused from the accusation that PCI failed to provide an uniform,common for all and a complete syllabus for Pharm D(PB) students ,any course is structured so as some logical sequence is there....u should not make study a student of 1st class physics without making him first study ABCD alphabets.....similarly all pharmacy students should have studied pathophysiology first in B.Pharm only and then pharmacotherapeuticsI,II.and III.But since PCI is afterall PCI, they never taken care that one uniform syllabus should be made for all the universities. This PharmD course is also directly copied from USA system of education.... why PCI could also have structured such a syllabus earlier only, but never- we know only to do copy from USA...we will never take first step.Moreover in RGUHS, it seems they structured or copied the syllabus without using brains.even RGUHS doesnt know how to copy properly!!! And I can't blame anyone else because I expect vision of an Organisation to be broader than a student's or than an individual's. okay but now what is there in our hands is- we must ask our university that atleast before we pass out these basic subjects should be taught to us... So what I want to say is that without being made to study these core subjects (or without the inclusion of these subjects in our transcripts) , what will be the value of our degree/qualification? Moreover these subjects are included in the Pharm D(6 years) syllabus,so they dont need to worry...But what about us Pharm D(PB)? again as this course is clinically oriented, when we will pass out and will be in clinical field/hospitals, we will be working along with physicians...I fear what will happen when suppose during an interaction they will ask us a simple basic question about pathophysiology eg. whats the functions of IL-1, IL-6 etc and we will fail to reply.Again they may make fun of us as addressing us "compounder turned doctors".Sir we wont be an effective and competitive clinical pharmacist 58
  58. 58. which is the central objective of this course. PCI is the parent organisation.we must put this issue infront of them, into their ears.sir I sincerely request you to take this issue to PCI and our university registrar, dean and chairman(Board of studies).we NET PharmD people did our bit by posting letters to PCI and RGUHS people through our principal and also high level management of our college has also assured us that they will, at their level, take this issue further to the policy makers.But for this to happen successfully and fast, such voices should come and raise also from other PB students from other colleges and universities.We learnt similar syllabus problems are there within many universities.Because honestly we are very small in strength esp PB ...hardly few all over India...and this only is the reason that such blunder happened in formulating the syllabus by PCI or respective universities,, however, well, we are bothered only about RGUHS syllabus....so now we do need to take some disperate steps as fast as possible so that we the current batch can also may get benefitted.No fun if PCI make additions in the syllabus after we all pass out. Again like America did, they will also make ammendments/laws that PB students from _year to _year are only eligible and rest are not..... You will understand my point better if you look into the FPGEC bulletin 2011(availble for free download -search in google-easily you may find). In reference to PharmD(PB) students, i feel PCI should see to it that whosoever gets the degree PharmD, certified by them, should have basic knowledge in a subject like pathophysiology, hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy.if there are discriminations between PharmD and PharmD(PB), those should be rectified on ground level......one same ground/course for each PharmD student.....afterall we PharmD(PB) students will also be certified as PharmD...we all are supposed to be called as Doctor Of Pharmacy.pathophysiology is the essence of PharmD and Pharm D(PB) course. unless child wont cry, even mother wont feed the child her milk. similarly i am making hue and cry here on this wall so that this hunger in us Pharm D(PB) students gets into notice of our parent organisation PCI. we even wrote and posted letters regarding this issue to PCI president and our university registrar. Again the same thing I am saying that the ultimate sufferers will be guys like me PharmD(PB) who dont have BASIC FUNDAMENTAL CORE CLINICALLY ORIENTED SUBJECTS{LIKE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY,HOSP PHARMACY ,COMMUNITY PHARMACY ON WHICH OTHER SUBJECTS ARE BASED LIKE PHARMACOTHERAPEUTICS-I,II,III in their syllabus and 59
  59. 59. that makes us quite a looser in terms of competency and effectivity when we speak of clinical Pharmacist. WE dont want to fell short and feel ashamed when we will pass out and be in same clinical field along with physicians. Also our agenda is just that we want RGUHS or PCI to include these basic subjects in our PB syllabus...ONE COMMON GROUND AND COURSE FOR ALL PHARM D AND PHARMD PB GRADUATES... we must get fair opportunity to study these basic clinically oriented subjects- as afterall Pharm D and PharmDPB are all about clinical Pharmacy.   Well its up to University i guess. Even B-pharmacy & M-pharmacy each university has different syllabus . So, its up to the university i guess .   A similar issue A batch from VLCP suffered similar glitch for more than 15 years . No state board of pharmacy wanted to register only people passed in those 2 to years .So, no body could n't go to any forien countries to do job. Their juniors can regsiter and their seniors can register but not only their batch + 2 more batches. .They as a team brought college, university and PCI to court . The case ran for 10 years and nothing happend. Finally someone taught them art of Negotiation. So their seniors like Ramana Reddy formed a team and strated negotiating with college, university , and PCI. It took sometime but finally their batch got recognisized. So, blaming or making noise may get "attention" but may not solve actual problem.. New developments in the scheme of things but very late Subject: Immediate attention for correction and inclusion of subject for Pharm D(Post Bacclaureate ) course- reg Sir, I am trying to bring to your kind notice that there is a discrepancy in the course details of First year Post Baccalaureate PharmD released in the regulations of RGUHS, 2008. It is observed that in the subject details mentioned in page no.2/table for First year Post Baccalaureate course , serial no. 4.5 under the name of the subject it is mentioned as Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics. 60
  60. 60. However there is total deviation observed in the scheme of examination for the same course in page no.4, it is Hospital & Community Pharmacy subject mentioned in serial no. 1.5. Infact one that is referred in this page is the appropriate title and one that is mentioned in page no. 2 is not relevant. Hence I request you to submit the same to the University so that it may be considered in forthcoming Academic Council Meeting. However the "Students Representation Copy" is attached here with this mail for your reference. Thanking You H.O.D Pharmacy Practice, N.E.T Pharmacy College. PHARM D(PB) course is a failure of PCI PCI failed to provide an uniform, common for all and a complete syllabus for Pharm D (PB) students.   Monopoly-is this the motto behind delayedsubject addition issue? who are the stakeholders for pharmD(PB)? Who will protect our rights ?who will see our benefits are taken care ofinstead of thinking about others/PharmD , let us think about ourselves /PharmD(PB).Once you are happy then only you are able to keep others happy isnt it?one official association should be made there concerning the benefits of PharmD(PB) and for the protection of rights of pharmd(PB) students, who will take care of any issues related with PharmD(PB).whats ur say?Any talk related with the betterment of pharmD(PB) students should be encouraged here.Friends,my opinions are entirely my own and I can recommend them. I agree with you on some of the points u made here on this post, but my issue is that there should be some uniformity through out the country regarding the syllabus of a PharmD/PharmD(PB) curriculum.thats all i have to say.When I paid an amount as fees in my college to get some degree and study a curriculum, i just want to make it sure that i get the best out of it. My concern is only that the fundamental, basic ,core subjects like pathophysiology, hospital Pharmacy and community pharmacy must get added in the PharmD(PB) syllabus,this year before i pass out. I am not blaming entirely to organizations like PCI and universities for this.When I took admission in PharmD(PB), I was ignorant 61
  61. 61. about this syllabus issue, but now today when i came to know about this, i want to rectify it and make other pharmD(PB) students like me ,aware about the same. However I guess some blame also goes to the abovesaid parent organizations, as when they are launching and approving a course, they should ensure that all is well, because i expect an organization's vision should be much broader than an individual's.you are responsible for your own life. I am not against PharmD regular, I wish them all the best and all the luck. But I am worried about myself and PharmD(PB) syllabus . There is nothing wrong in it!!!Now a days when it snows or rains, 5% of people go outside and play and enjoy it ; while 95% make a Facebook status about it. Purpose is get aware and do something about the issue, just dont sit there doing nothing. On pharmaceutical events and on Facebook also I see students worrried and talking about trival issues like putting prefix " Dr" infront of their name in internship or after getting degree. all tactics to mislead students from real issue. It doesnt matter whether they write PharmD or doctor of pharmacy in degree, ultimately you remain a pharmacist. My opinion:The real issue is they dont want to add the mentioned subjects in other universities except in deemed universities like JSS and Manipal, who dont depend on others to add any subjects in their syllabus. Thats why their fees is exceptionally high in comparison to other universities and colleges . For pharmD(PB) 3 yrs course ,they ask 9 lakhs.And Dr B.Suresh is Principal of the JSS college as well as Chairman of JSS univ,who also happens to be the PCI president.They want to create monopoly and enjoy the exclusive status of colleges/universities with advantages of having additional subjects. The more delay it gets for years,the more these exclusive universities enjoy this benefit.Quote:You can tell monopoly is an old game because there is a luxury tax and rich people can go to jail.   we should not be made scapegoats!!! My issue is that there should be some uniformity through out the country regarding the syllabus of a PharmD/PharmD(PB) curriculum.thats all i have to say.When I paid an amount as fees in my college to get some degree and study a curriculum, i just want to make it sure that i get the best out of it. My concern is only that the fundamental, basic ,core subjects like pathophysiology, hospital 62
  62. 62. Pharmacy and community pharmacy must get added in the PharmD(PB) syllabus, before i pass out this year. I am not blaming entirely to organizations like PCI and universities for this.When I took admission in PharmD(PB), I was ignorant about this syllabus issue that these subjects are missing, but now today when i came to know about this, i want to rectify it and make other pharmD(PB) students like me ,aware about the same. However I guess some blame also goes to the abovesaid parent organizations, as when they are launching and approving a course, they should ensure that all is well, because i expect an organization's vision should be much broader than an individual's. I can see PCI is getting a free publicity from me for PharmD(PB) Any publicity is good for PharmD(PB),to spread awareness?Positive or negative publicity both helps PCI?Isnt it?   Not much time is left...Changes must come before we pass out I appeal to PharmD(PB) students of all colleges of nation to be aware of your own syllabus and appeal Organisations and PCI for the required additions to be made in the curriculum before you pass out, so that doors remain open for us otherwise you dont get worth your college fee. PharmD(PB) students shall start a NON COOPERATIVE strike againstPCI PharmD(PB)students shall start a NON Cooperative strike against colleges,Universities and PCI. Sorry if i sound rebellious but thats the very idea. We cant afford to get it done late any more . This is high time.Subjects must get added this year. Lumpenproletariat of PharmD(PB) students society will do the damage Lumpenproletariat means the apolitical lower orders of society uninterested in revolutionary advancement.We must get united and ask for the rights like subject additions in our curriculum.This only will open doors of further good quality education may it be indian or abroad education for us.If we ourselves wont elect the subjects which must be in the curriculum, than who else will?WE are responsible for our lives. United we stand , divided we fall. We must not see the downfall. Many people have this notion 63

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