Digital

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Digital

  1. 1. DIGITAL AGE OF DESIGN
  2. 2. New Technology <ul><li>Starting in the 1990’s, graphic design experien ced a change from its previous postmodern look. </li></ul><ul><li>Digital technology enabled single designers to create artwork that used to take countless numbers of people to create. </li></ul><ul><li>As technologies such as the Macintosh computer, PostScript programs and PageMaker progressed, so did the face of design. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Before digital technologies, graphic designers, typesetters, production artists, camera operators, platemakers and others were all involved in the process. From the 1990’s on, these narrow specializations were no longer needed. </li></ul><ul><li>Using a desktop computer saved massive amounts of time and money, and by the mid-90’s, the number of designers working on their own increased exponentially. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Internet Explosion <ul><li>With the explosion of the internet, the web became another media outlet to solve design problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Websites can bring images and messages to the mass market in a much more appealing way because of the incorporation of video and audio. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Wired magazine started in 1993. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The “Grunge” Look <ul><li>Keeping with the music scene of the time, graphic design also adopted a chaotic, blurred type of look in the early 90’s. </li></ul><ul><li>It was a controversial design style, and part of the controversy of the “grunge” look came from consumers’ distrust of advertisers use of “hip” designs to sell. </li></ul>
  7. 7. “MTV” generation
  8. 8. One publication on the cutting edge of the Grunge design scene at the time was Ray Gun .
  9. 9. David Carson “inspired young designers while angering others who believed he was crossing the line between order and chaos” -Meggs <ul><li>David Carson was one of Ray Gun’s most controversial art directors. </li></ul><ul><li>His unorthodox typography was near illegible at times. </li></ul><ul><li>His page design was a combination of blurred, overlapping and faded images and type. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Carson’s motto
  11. 11. Art Chantry “…a part of the anti-establishment subculture while on the other (hand) working selectively for mainstream commercial clients” -Eskilson <ul><li>First found work for concert and band publicity. </li></ul><ul><li>Chantry blends photographs, chaotic lettering, bright colors and doodled drawings </li></ul>
  12. 14. Stefan Sagmeister “yearns for design that means something, that connects people at a human level” -Eskilson <ul><li>Came up with a revolutionary stylistic device, a “tattooed look.” </li></ul><ul><li>He even went so far as having his assistant carve letters into his body with a knife for his legendary poster for a lecture at Cranbrook Academy. </li></ul>
  13. 17. More Digital Designs
  14. 21. Resources <ul><li>Meggs, Philip. Meggs’ History of Graphic Design . Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2006. </li></ul><ul><li>Eskilson, Stephen. Graphic Design: A New History . New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>Gibson, William. Ray Gun: Out of Control. New York: Simon & Schuster Editions, 1997. </li></ul><ul><li>www.philipsleingallery.com/view.php?todo=viewall&rtst=42&n=Art+Chantry </li></ul>

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