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India Health Report on Nutrition 2015

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This is the presentation given at the launch of the India Health Report on Nutrition 2015 in Delhi 10 December.

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India Health Report on Nutrition 2015

  1. 1. INDIA HEALTH REPORT: NUTRITION 2015
  2. 2. KEY MESSAGES
  3. 3. Stunting, wasting and underweight rates of India's children have declined, especially during the last decade, but still exceed levels observed in countries at similar income levels. KEY MESSAGE: 1
  4. 4. The rate of improvement in nutritional status has not kept pace with India's significant gains in economic prosperity and agricultural productivity during recent decades. Stunting rates are likely to decline with economic progress, but economic growth cannot, by itself, reduce undernutrition and may contribute to overweight and obesity. KEY MESSAGE: 2
  5. 5. Nutritional status and progress on reducing stunting vary markedly across India's states indicating that state-specific approaches are necessary to achieve further gains in reducing stunting. KEY MESSAGE: 3
  6. 6. The underlying reasons for India's high rates of stunting and variability in progress are complex and intertwined. KEY MESSAGE: 4
  7. 7. India ignores the problem of undernutrition and its impact on child development at its peril and risks large economic, health and social consequences for future generations. KEY MESSAGE: 5
  8. 8. India's undernutrition problem is a serious threat to child development. Accelerating action at the state-level is essential to change the course of the future for India's children. KEY MESSAGE: 6
  9. 9. FIGURE 1. TRENDS IN NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN INDIA, 1993 to 2014
  10. 10. FIGURE 2. PREVALENCE OF UNDER-5 STUNTING AND LEVEL OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, BY COUNTRY
  11. 11. FIGURE 3. AVERAGE ANNUAL RATE OF REDUCTION IN UNDER-5 STUNTING, 2005 to 2014, BY COUNTRY
  12. 12. FIGURE 4. STUNTING, WASTING AND UNDERWEIGHT PREVALENCE IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN, BY GLOBAL REGIONS
  13. 13. FIGURE 5. PER CAPITA INCOME AND PREVALENCE OF STUNTING IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN, BY STATE
  14. 14. FIGURE 6. AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY AND PREVALENCE OF STUNTING IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN IN INDIA
  15. 15. FIGURE 7. PREVALENCE OF STUNTING IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN, BY STATE
  16. 16. FIGURE 8. PREVALENCE OF STUNTING IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN IN 2014 AND ANNUAL RATE OF REDUCTION, 2006 TO 2014, BY STATE
  17. 17. FIGURE 9. PREVALENCE OF WASTING IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN, BY STATE
  18. 18. FIGURE 10. PREVALENCE OF UNDERWEIGHT IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN, BY STATE
  19. 19. FIGURE 11. PREVALENCE OF ANEMIA IN CHILDREN (6-59 MONTHS) AND WOMEN (15-49 YEARS), BY STATE
  20. 20. FIGURE 12. PREVALENCE OF STUNTING, WASTING AND UNDERWEIGHT IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE
  21. 21. FIGURE 13. STUNTING PREVALENCE IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN AND AVERAGE AGE OF MARRIAGE OF WOMEN
  22. 22. COMPARATIVE INDICATORS
  23. 23. 1. CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS WHO ARE STUNTED
  24. 24. 2. CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS WHO ARE WASTED
  25. 25. 3. INFANTS 0-5 MONTHS OLD WHO ARE EXCLUSIVELY BREASTFED
  26. 26. 4. CHILDREN UNDER 3 YEARS WHO WERE LOW BIRTH WEIGHT
  27. 27. 5. WOMEN 15-49 YEARS OLD WITH ANEMIA
  28. 28. 6. CHILDREN 6-59 MONTHS OLD WITH ANEMIA
  29. 29. 7. ADOLESCENT GIRLS 15-18 YEARS OLD WITH LOW BODY MASS INDEX
  30. 30. 8. INFANTS 6-8 MONTHS OLD WHO RECEIVE SOLID, SEMI-SOLID OR SOFT FOODS
  31. 31. 9. MINIMUM DIET DIVERSITY DURING COMPLEMENTARY FEEDING (FOR INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN 6-23 MONTHS OLD)
  32. 32. 10. CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS WITH DIARRHEA IN 15 DAYS PRIOR TO SURVEY
  33. 33. 11. MOTHERS OF CHILDREN UNDER 3 YEARS OLD WHO RECEIVED THREE OR MORE ANTENATAL CHECKUPS
  34. 34. 12. CHILDREN 12-23 MONTHS OLD WHO ARE FULLY IMMUNIZED
  35. 35. 13. CHILDREN 6-35 MONTHS OLD WHO RECEIVED SUPPLEMENTARY FOOD UNDER ICDS FOR AT LEAST 21 DAYS IN THE MONTH PRIOR TO THE SURVEY
  36. 36. 14. CURRENTLY MARRIED WOMEN WITH 10 OR MORE YEARS OF SCHOOLING
  37. 37. 15. WOMEN AGED 20-24 YEARS WHO WERE MARRIED BEFORE THE AGE OF 18
  38. 38. 16. OPEN DEFECATION
  39. 39. 17. POPULATION BELOW STATE-SPECIFIC POVERTY LINE
  40. 40. 18. STATES THAT HAVE A NUTRITION MISSION

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