Dulce et decorum est olympians

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Dulce et decorum est olympians

  1. 1. Presentation by: Kim Dalve, Sam Lucas, Zach Gray, & Bruce Greer
  2. 2. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. The speaker is a first-hand Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots witness to this event. He is War But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots recalling it. He is a soldier in Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. this war. He was able to get GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, his gas mask on in time. He Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling was greatly affected by what And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- happened. It stays with him in Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. his dreams. This could indicate that he may have post In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, Dreams He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. traumatic stress disorder. He is cynical on how war is being If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, shown to the youth. And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- Cynical My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  3. 3. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots The poem takes place Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. during World War I. Gas GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, was used widely. The Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; speaker is talking in first But someone still was yelling out and stumbling And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- person. In the plural Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light form “we” and in the As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. singular form “I” in the In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, last lines of the second He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. stanza and the third. He If in some smothering dreams you too could pace is a first-hand witness. Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  4. 4. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots The audience are those Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. who may believe this lie GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, of war being glorious. Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; The speaker tells his But someone still was yelling out and stumbling And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- story in order to Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light disprove and question As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. this. In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, Latin watch the white eyes writhing in his face, Andfor: “How sweet & becomingcoulddie for every jolt,sick blood His hanging face, like a devils If you to hear, at one’s the of sin; country.” Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  5. 5. Dulce Et Decorum EstBent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,Till on the haunting flares we turned our backsAnd towards our distant rest began to trudge.Men marched asleep. Many had lost their bootsBut limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; -Body PartsDrunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hootsOf disappointed shells that dropped behind. -Impaired Movement -Horrifying ActionsGAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, -Disgusting detailsFitting the clumsy helmets just in time;But someone still was yelling out and stumbling -Ways to DieAnd floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- -SleepDim, through the misty panes and thick green lightAs under a green sea, I saw him drowning. -SightIn all my dreams, before my helpless sight, -YouthHe plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. -SoundIf in some smothering dreams you too could pace -WaterBehind the wagon that we flung him in,And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, -DreamsHis hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; -GloryIf you could hear, at every jolt, the blood -GreenCome gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud -Depressing/SomberOf vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,--My friend, you would not tell with such high zestTo children ardent for some desperate glory,The old Lie: Dulce et decorum estPro patria mori.
  6. 6. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots The imagery uses the But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; senses to create a full Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. picture and vicarious experience. GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. War In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. Sickness If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, Disappointment/ His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; Disenchantment If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  7. 7. The degree of fatigue Et Decorum Est Dulce Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Journey Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, toward death Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots Similes But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. Metaphors GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, Personification Eyes beingthestill was yellinggas in stumbling Fitting But someone blindedhelmets just time; clumsy by out and And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light refers to calcium hydroxide, if ingested As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. internal bleeding, skeletal paralysis, … In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  8. 8. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots A shift occurs here. Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. The tired, worn out GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, soldiers quickly Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; become enthusiastic & But someone still was yelling out and stumbling active. And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. This event is very For the next significant to the speaker. Itseveral lines the In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, remains engrained in their first person He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. singular “I” is mind. It is a frightening, used. If in some smothering dreams you too could pace depressing, and traumatic Behind the wagon that we flung him in, For this line and And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, the last three experience. The speaker is His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; lines the second critical on the view of war. If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood person “you” is Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, used. This is to Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud have the reader Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- become My friend, you would not tell with such high zest attached to the To children ardent for some desperate glory, poem and The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori. affected by it.
  9. 9. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots The punctuation in this But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; poem is very much like a Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. narrative. Unlike a lot of poetry that sounds GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; lyrical. Commas and But someone still was yelling out and stumbling periods are used And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light frequently. The poem is As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. divided into four stanzas. In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, Exclamations are used in He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. the second stanza. If in some smothering dreams you too could pace These exclamations Behind the wagon that we flung him in, points heighten the shift And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; in tone from a slow, sad If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood memoir to an action- Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud packed violent event. Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  10. 10. Dulce Et Decorum Est Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots 1 The poem is divided into But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind; four un-even stanzas. Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of disappointed shells that dropped behind. End rhyme is exhibited. It is in an ABAB, CDCD, GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; etc. pattern. The poem But someone still was yelling out and stumbling does not follow iambic And floundering like a man in fire or lime.-- 2 Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light pentameter. Though it As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. rhymes, it is not lyrical. In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, This could refer to the He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. 3 content. War is not like If in some smothering dreams you too could pace music. It isn’t beautiful. Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devils sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud 4 Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
  11. 11. The purpose is to show the speaker’s reality of war. It is to show the youth that it is not a romantic tale of heroism to be in war. It is a gruesome, tragicexperience that will never go away.The glory earned in war comes at a tremendous price.

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