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Senior Life Final PDF2 copy

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Senior Life Final PDF2 copy

  1. 1. NickHewer shares his views on the importance of diagnosing pancreatic cancer early A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT JUNE SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK ONLINE which.co.uk provideadviceonpayingforcare INSIDE Traveltipsforthosewith physicalandsensoryneeds P9 WATCH ONLINE Footageof HamptonCourtFlowerShow Seniorlife
  2. 2. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT2 SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK S ome of the biggest numbers of older people can be found in developing countries. Clo- ser to home, recent statistics show there are now 11 milli- on people aged 65 or over in the UK, and 3 million of tho- se are aged 80 or over, so there is no denying that overall we are living longer and healt- hier lives, thanks mainly to the advances in medicine and healthier diets. But as we grow older we all face new chal- lenges that can put up barriers to leading fulfilling, independent later lives. Age UK is here for all those who have reached la- ter life, and also to help make things bet- ter for future generations. Whether it be ill- ness, loneliness or poverty which affect pe- ople, those in later life still have the right to laugh, love and be needed. It’s important that they have the opportunity to stay in- dependent and to continue doing the things they love. Long-standing stereotypes about older people are no longer really relevant as ma- ny older people enjoy later life feeling fit- ter, more active and more empowered than ever before. Retirement is no longer neces- sarily a barrier to enjoying the best of what life has to offer. These days, retirement is a new beginning and some older people are volunteering, joining social groups, men- toring, fundraising, home visiting and ma- king a huge difference at all levels in their communities, while others are opting to continue working longer. For some, however, life is not quite so rosy and some of the challenges to age- ing will be explored further in this supple- ment. Although fewer older people suffer from poverty than in the past, financial is- sues remain a huge problem for a signifi- cant minority. That people have enough money from state and private resources to live comfortably and participate fully in society in later life is essential. It’s al- so important that older people can access high quality health and social care. The- re are 1.2 million people in England aged 65 and over who are providing unpaid ca- re to a disabled, seriously ill or older relati- ve or friend. Many of them struggle to co- pe with the demands of juggling the needs of the loved ones they care for with their own needs. The social care system is massively un- derfunded due to year on year cuts to bud- gets, leaving hundreds of thousands of ol- der people who need support to struggle on alone. The lucky ones have sufficient funds to buy in some support, or can rely on the goodwill of family, neighbours and friends. But many are effectively abandoned, ma- king it more likely that they will end up in A & E because of a health crisis. Dementia is an increasingly important health problem affecting later life. It is es- timated that the number of people living with dementia will reach one million by 2020, and so there’s an urgent and growing Thenumberofolderpeopleintheworld isgrowing atanastonishingrate andisexpectedtoreachover2billionby2050. READ MORE ON WWW.SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK Will writing Remember a charity discuss the advtantages of leaving a charitable donation in your will P4 A garden for every retiree Award winning garden designerTracy Foster provides her top tips for gardening this summer P12 Brain training Help to keep your brain active by playing some of our online games need to support those who have the condi- tion and their families. Currently around 686,000 people in England are estimated to have dementia but the help available in the community and at home is not re- motely keeping pace. Recent studies ha- ve found 61 per cent of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, vascular de- mentia and other forms of the condition say they feel depressed or anxious, largely because of a lack of support. In addition only 58 per cent say they are living well after receiving a diagnosis. Surveys show that dementia is the illness most fea- red by people over the age of 55, who are understandably concerned about losing their memory and identity, so we need to improve the position of people with de- mentia in our society, and fast. Every older person should be able to li- ve safely and with dignity in good quali- ty, warm housing that meets their indivi- dual needs, free from exploitation or abu- se. Where people live goes a long way to determining how healthy, independent and active they can be.Too many older pe- ople are living in poor-quality, cold homes which are hazardous to their health and are struggling to adapt their homes be- cause of the hassle and cost. Shockingly, we are becoming increa- singly aware that many older people are being targeted by scammers, with a huge impact on their health and finances. Ol- der people are at special risk of certain types of fraud, such as doorstep scams; bank and card account takeover; pension liberation scams; investment fraud and postal scams. Older people are targeted because it is assumed they have more mo- ney in savings, they often live alone and because they are sometimes seen as being gullible – which the rest of us might con- sider to mean they are friendly and kind. A recent Guardian columnist spoke re- verentially of our new older generation: “We have an ageing population of radicals redefining what is possible as we grow ol- der. They are passionate, worldly people who are as politically fiery as ever - the anti-nuclear activists, the equality and justice protesters, the union members, the travellers, the first generation to kick back against the unspoken requirement to marry and put up and shut up. They are good at making friends and interested in the world. None of that changes just be- cause they’re older.” And with that in mind, it’s now more possible than ever to reconfigu- re what it really means to be an older person in 2015. By tackling the challenges mentioned above, we have the ability to change life for older people for the better. We need to campaign and influence policy makers so that getting older doesn’t need to be something to be fearful of. In fact it could be something to get excited about and celebrate. Let us embrace senior living. Please RecycleFollow us MediaplanetUK @MediaplanetUK @MediaplanetUK Project Manager: Sam Ayerst Email: sam.ayerst@mediaplanet.com Business Developer: Alex Williams Designer: Kathleen Rayfield Content and Production Manager: Brogan Wright Managing Director: Carl Soderblom E-mail: brogan.wright@mediaplanet.com Mediaplanet contact information: Phone: +44 (0) 203 642 0737 E-mail: info.uk@mediaplanet.com IN THIS ISSUE Senior life: looking to the future By Age UK
  3. 3. REMEMBER A CHARITY INFOGRAPHICS alzheimers.org.uk/legacies Registered charity no. 296645. A company limited by guarantee and registered in England no. 2115499. Alzheimer’s Society operates in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Will your legacy make a lasting difference? Alzheimer’s Society is the UK’s leading dementia charity. We believe passionately that life doesn’t end when dementia begins. Once you are sure your loved ones are looked after, a gift in your Will to Alzheimer’s Society will make a lasting difference to people affected by dementia. To find out more or to order our free guide to gifts in Wills please call 0870 011 0290 to speak to your local legacy officer, email legacies@alzheimers.org.uk or visit alzheimers.org.uk/legacies Of gifts to charities in wills. This is the equivalent of nearly 20 Red Nose Days £2.16 billion a year 2 OUT OF 3 dogs trained by Guide Dogs are made possible by gifts in wills 6 OUT OF 10 new lifeboats launched by RNLI are made possible by gifts in wills 74%of the UK population support a charity during their lifetime, however, only 7.3 per cent of the UK population went on to leave a charitable gift in their will when they died The good news is, when surveyed, 17%of the UK population claimed they have included a charitable gift in their will. This is the highest level to date. Many charities were founded by a legacy and many could not continue to exist without this vital source of income One third of Cancer Research UK’s life-saving work is funded by gifts in Wills £ SOURCE: REMEMBER A CHARITY Will you leave a gift that’s full of life? Guide dog Pippa is there for her owner Lynette all day, every day. She’s given her the confidence to start enjoying her whole life again without relying on others. Please leave a gift in your Will to Guide Dogs and help people with sight loss live every day to the full. A charity registered in England and Wales (209617) and Scotland (SC038979). 8148 06/15 A15G18001 For a free information pack and DVD, visit guidedogs.org.uk/life or call 0845 37 27 371 7:00AM 3:27PM 8:44PM 11:00PM 8:07AM 11:31AM
  4. 4. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT4 SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK MEDIAPLANET INSPIRATION JARGON BUSTER Administrator:hassimilardutiestoanexecutor,ac- tingforestateswherethere’snowillorexecutor,orthe namedexecutorisunableorunwillingtoact. BeneficiaryApersonororganisationtowhomyoulea- veagift. Bequest : Agiftinyourwilltoapersonororganisa- tion.Therearedifferenttypesofgifts:pecuniarybe- quest;residuarybequest;specificbequest.Seebelow forfurtherdetails. Codicil:Adocumentthatamendsyourwill. Conditional legacy: Alegacythatisconditional uponaparticulareventhappening(forinstance,“to mysonifheshouldbecomeadoctor”). Demonstrative legacy:Pecuniarylegacypayable outofaspecificfund. Estate:Deceased’spossessions,propertyandmoney. Debtsandgiftsarepaidoutoftheestate. Executor: Person(s)appointedbyyoutoensurethat thewishesinyourwillarecarriedout. Guardian:Namedperson(s)inyourwillwhoisre- sponsibleforyourchildrenuntiltheybecome18inthe eventtheyareorphaned. Grant of probate:Adocumentissuedbythe courtconfirmingboththevalidityofawillandthe executor’srighttoadministertheestate. Inheritance tax (IHT):Amountpaidwhenyoudie ontheproportionofyourestateoverthetaxthreshold (whichvarieseverytaxyear).Giftstocharityarefreeof IHT.Visithmrc.gov.uk/cto/iht.htmtofindthecurrent inheritancetaxrates Intestate:Personwhodieswithnowill.Certainre- lativescanapplyforyourestate.Ifyouhavenone,your moneywillgototheCrown. Issue:Yourchildren,theirchildrenandsoondown thefamilytree. Joint property:Underjointtenancytheproperty passestothesurvivor(s)followingadeath. Legacy:Gifttoapersonororganisation. Letters of administration: Issuedinsteadofagrant ofprobatebyacourttoanadministrator. Life interest:Grantingaright,oftenunderatrust,to someonewhichlastsonlyforthelifetimeoftheperson whobenefitsbyit. Mirror will: Onecontainingalmostidenticaltermsto yours.Usuallyusedbyspousesorpartnerswherethe beneficiariesarelargelythesame. Noncupative will: Awillmadeorallybefore witnesses. Pecuniary bequest: afixedsumofmoney Probate:Officialproofofawill’svalidity.Ifthevalue oftheestateismorethan£5,000,probatemayhaveto beappliedforbytheexecutors,whocanthenadminis- terthewillanddistributetheestateaccordingtoyour wishes. Residue:Remainderofyourestateafterothergifts aremadeanddebtsarecleared. Residuary bequest: agiftmadefromtheresidue. Itcanbeashare(percentage)oftheremainder,orallof theremainder Testator: Thepersonwhohasmadeawill. Trust:Awrittenarrangementwherebyanappointed trusteeisgivenmoneyorassetstoholdandmanage forthebenefitofthosedefinedinthedeedorwillthat createdthetrust. Trustee:Individualsoranorganisationnamedina trustdeedtotakeresponsibilityforthetrustassetsand managethem Will: Alistofinstructionstellingyourexecutorswhat todowithyourestatewhenyoudieand,ifrelevant,ap- pointingguardiansforyourchildren T heBritishcan alwaysberelied upontoputtheir handsintheir pocketsandsup- portacharity— evenintheseausteretimes.Lookat thegenerosityandenthusiasmfor thelastRedNoseDay,forexample, whichatthetimeofwritinghad raisedover£78,000,000.Nowthe goodnewsisthatmorepeoplethan everaresayingthattheyareleaving acharitabledonationintheirWills, too.That’snotjustimportant.It’svi- tal.Giftsleftinwillsareworthmore than£2billiontoUKcharities. RobCopeisdirectorofRemem- beraCharity,acoalitionofcharities setupin2000toencouragelegacy giving.“Ourlatestbenchmarksur- veyshowsthat17percentofthepu- blicclaimtohaveleftadonation toacharityintheirWills,which isitshighestleveltodate,”hesays. “Wealsoknowthatfarfewerpe- ople,just11percent,havenever thoughtaboutleavingacharita- blegiftintheirwills.Bothoftho- senumbersareencouraging.The challengenowistomakethemes- sageevenstrongerandtosaythatif yourneighbours,friendsandfamily areleavinggiftsintheirwills,may- beyoushouldconsiderit,too.”Re- memberaCharityhighlightsthat justafourpercentchangeinbeha- viourwouldgenerateanadditional £1billionforgoodcausesintheUK everyyear. Support Althoughmakingawillisoneofthe mostimportantdecisionswewill evertake,manyofusputoffdoing so:lastyear,figuresfromRemember aCharityshowedthatalmostfourin 10over-50sadmittedtonothaving madeawill.Yetitisquickandeasy todo;andleavingcharitablegiftsin willsisInheritancetaxfree.Allyou needconsideriswhichcharity,or charities,youwouldmostlike tosupport. Question:Aremorepeopleleavinggiftstocharitiesintheirwills? Answer: Numbers are increasing, although many of us don’t — yet it’s an easy and important thing to do. Writingawill? Remeberacharity! “Our latest benchmark survey shows that 17 per cent of the public claim to have left a donation to a charity in their wills” - Rob Cope PHOTO: THINKSTOCK Read more at seniorlifenews.co.uk Perhapspeoplewhoaren’tincluding adonationintheirwillsareworried thattheirfamilieswouldloseoutin somewayiftheydid.ButCopepoints outthatthereisroomtodoboth.“Your donationdoesn’thavetobealarge amount,”hesays.“Charitiesarethe backboneofourcommunitiesandthe publichasaspecialrelationshipwith them.Sothinkaboutacharitythat mighthavehelpedyouoryourfamily, andwhatevenasmallgiftcoulddo. Whatanamazingwaytosay’thank you’afteryouhavegone.” Donationsarethelifebloodofcha- rities;andsomearesuffering—and evenfolding—withoutfinancialsup- port.“Imagineifthosegoodcauses weren’tthere,”saysCope.“Byleaving acharitabledonationinyourWill,you areensuringthatacharitycanconti- nueitsworkandbenefitthe nextgeneration.” By Tony Greenway SOURCE: REMEMBER A CHARITY
  5. 5. The WRVS Benevolent Trust provides grants to help with making everyday life easier, or at times of crisis, for present or former WVS, WRVS or Royal Voluntary Service volunteers or staff. The Trust also gives Youth Bursary awards once a year to young RVS Volunteers (16-25 years old) who want to do some- thing amazing to further their education or career prospects. Legacies are vital to our very survival, a fact that most of our supporters don’t realise. To raise some much needed aware- ness, we’ve joined forces with Remember A Charity to raise awareness of the importance of having a Will, leaving gifts to charities and promote legacy giving. Do you want to know more and help? Get in touch: enquiry@wrvsbt.org.uk or check our website for more information: www.wrvsbt.org.uk WRVS Benevolent Trust a registered charity in England and Wales no. 261931. Contact the Elderly is a registered charity in England and Wales (1146149) and in Scotland (SC039377). Company Number (07869142) Registered office: 2 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W 0DH. Leave the lasting gift of friendship in your will “It’s not very nice when you feel lonely, you just go to bed, get up, go to bed, get up and that’s your life; it’s nothing really.” Joan, 89 For 50 years Contact the Elderly has been offering a lifeline of friendship to lonely people aged 75 and over through monthly tea parties. Leave a gift in your will and make a profound difference to the lives of the oldest and loneliest people. To find out more: Call Debra Bollan on 0800 716 543 or visit www.contact-the-elderly.org.uk Sue Ryder provides incredible care for people with life-changing conditions We do whatever we can to be a safety net for our patients and their loved ones at the most difficult time of their lives. We need to raise £37.7m a year to keep services running. A gift in your will can help us transform the lives of people living with life- limiting conditions. Could you help us change lives? call: 0845 050 1953 email: giftinwill@sueryder.org visit: www.sueryder.org/giftinwill Sue Ryder is a charity registered in England and Wales (1052076) and in Scotland (SC039578). Ref. No. 03167 © Sue Ryder. June 2015
  6. 6. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT6 SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK MEDIAPLANET 7 Registered charity number 222377 (England and Wales); SC041079 (Scotland) 2015.173 020 7696 6915 legacies@mencap.org.uk www.mencap.org.uk/legacies A gift for the future Mencap values and supports people with a learning disability and their families and carers to help them achieve what they want in life. Each week, 200 children are born in the UK with a learning disability. Mencap provides high quality, flexible services in areas like education, leisure, employment, housing and personal support to ensure that we are there to support everyone that needs us throughout their lives. Learning disability will always exist. You can transform lives with a single gift to Mencap in your will. For a free information booklet, please contact the Gifts in Wills team at Mencap on: The 4% survival rate for pancreatic cancer has not changed in 40 years. We are committed to funding ground-breaking research, awareness campaigns and providing medical education to improve early diagnosis and ultimately save lives. A legacy to Pancreatic Cancer Action will have a real and lasting impact on the fight against pancreatic cancer. Call 0303 040 1770 or visit www.panact.org for more information. © 2015 Pancreatic Cancer Action. Registered Charity No. 1137689 Leaving a legacy today will save lives in the future M artin is a successful property developer who lives with his wi- fe in Guildford. He has spent his life working hard, securing a futu- re for his wife and 41 year old son, managing private investment for his company. Martin was also the Chairman of Brentford Football Club, a position he was proud to have held for 20 years. Martin’s diagnosis came after suffering periods of unexplained indigestion, he was referred to a consultant who performed an endoscopy but was told there was nothing wrong. At the time Martin had no idea what these symptoms meant or what he was about to find out, he just knew that something wasn’t quite right. After his symptoms per- sisted and still with no answers he exaggera- ted having pain in his abdomen and was gi- ven a CT scan. On December 22nd 2012, Mar- tin was finally provided with an answer: he had pancreatic cancer and was estimated to have 3-5 months to live. When visiting the oncologist for the first time, Martin was adamant that he wasn’t go- ing to give in to his prognosis, telling him he had at least another 5 years of life he wanted to live. Seeing his determination, Martin’s oncologist started him on a strong course of chemotherapy,believingthatdespitethecan- cer,Martinwasfitandhealthyenoughtodeal with this treatment. At the end of this cour- se of treatment Martin describes his sense of achievement for getting through it despite the side effects, it worked very well and fol- lowing a positive CT scan he was able to ha- ve four months of ‘normal’ life, and even the opportunity to go on holiday with his wife. In June/July 2013 Martin had a relapse in his symptoms and it was found that the growths had spread to his liver. Not about to give up, his oncologist prescribed a different type of therapy that was already available in the US. Having investigated the clinical tri- al information for the particular treatment, Martin wasn’t convinced of the advantages, but looking back he realises how beneficial it really was. Over a period of a few months it was able to reduce the growths on his liver to such an extent that they were almost non-ex- istent. Although Martin realises this is not a cure for his condition, he feels like the treat- menthasheldhimatamaintenanceleveland allows him to get on with his life. Martin says he is now ticking along qui- te nicely, but what he finds to be most diffi- cult is the lack of consistency in his energy levels. He explains how he can have drastic lossofenergyandthenlikeaswitchhasbeen turned on, is up and running again. A keen tennis player, Martin describes being able to play four sets of tennis on one day, but on an- otheronlybeingabletoplayone;thereareso- me days when he finds it hard to play at all. However he admits that he realises how in- credibly lucky he is; his oncologist descri- bing him as being in the “long tail” of the survival curve. Looking to the future: learning to live with ‘Albert’ Martin has a hugely positive and resilient at- titude towards his cancer and is an inspira- tion for others going through a similar expe- rience. Martin describes how he and his fa- mily refer to the cancer growths as ‘Albert’ to help manage the taboo of the word ‘cancer’ and battle against the negativity that sur- rounds the condition. In the beginning he used to think about what the end would be like, but not anymore. He no longer feels li- ke he is different from anyone else, he doesn’t worry about what is waiting just around the corner and he is determined to get on with life and live it as best he can. Still working on a part time basis, he finds this as a welcome escape to take him away from his condition, even for just a day or two a week. Martin’s advice to anyone about to go th- roughasimilarsituationistostopandthink, “Itdoesn’thavetobeasbadasyouthink”,you need to battle on and not let the cancer chan- ge or define who you are. Martin is a positive and strong person with pancreatic cancer whose attitude towards his condition has kept him battling on for over two years, having been given just 3-5 months to live at his initial diagnosis. Theimpactofpancreaticcancer: everydayisanewchallenge By Natasha North, Pancreatic Cancer Action Pores ipiet quias ellum, ommoluptat prae. Ut ut et, omni beaquis cidisquid mod et et modi NEWS “Martin says he is now ticking along quite nicely, but what he finds to be most difficult is the lack of consistency in his energy levels.” COLUMN NickHewer: PatronofPancreatic CancerAction Lord Sugar’s former advisor and current Countdown host Nick Hewer discusses his views on pancreatic cancer and how in your golden years to consider our own health carefully. ”I’m aware first hand, through the lossofafamilymemberandanum- ber of close friends, of the devas- tating impact of a pancreatic can- cer diagnosis, and I know that so much more needs to be done to im- prove survival rates for patients”. “The key to change is getting more people diagnosed early in time for surgery, currently there is no test for pancreatic cancer. Surgery is theonlychanceforsurvival”. According to the National Can- cer Database, 68.5 per cent of pan- creatic cancers were diagnosed in those over age 65 years. This raises the importance of those in their senior years to take care of them- selves, “People need to take con- trol of their own health, if instin- ctsayssomethingisnotrightthen follow it up with your Doctor. This could save your life.” To find out more seniorlifenews.com PHOTO:PANCREATICCANCERACTION
  7. 7. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT8 SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK MEDIAPLANET 9 ...well,easier with the help of a Uniscan. 01268 419288 / QUOTE: SL0615 www.uniscan-walkers.co.uk Uniscan Limited, 38 Hornsby Square, Southfields Industrial Estate, Laindon, Basildon, Essex SS15 6SD. - BRITISHDE SIGN & MAN UFACTURE - E S T. 1 9 83 Summer time and the living is easy... FREE Brochure Available 3 & 4 leg walkers all: - Ultra lightweight and sturdy - Have a built in rest seat - Hand made in the UK just for you. the walking frame specialist J ayneisamulti-awardwinninggar- denerandputsmuchofhersuccess downtothewalkersshehasusedover thelast10years. Duringthepastdecade,Jayne– whohadaleftsidedstroke10years agohasbeenusingwalkerstoassistwithherin- dependentlivingandhasjusttakendeliveryofa newfourwheeledwalker, assheexplained:“The walkershavebeenalifesaverforme-itisassimple asthatandwithout themIwouldbeunabletoget outofbednevermindintothegarden. Frompre- paringmealsandpersonalcaretovisitingfriends andenjoyingdaysout,thewalkerenablesmetoen- joycompleteindependenceanddignityonadaily basis. InrecentyearsJaynehaswonnumerousgarde- ningawardsincluding:BestGardeninStaffordshi- re(Staffordshirenewsletter),StreetSceneStafford’s PrideinyourPatchawards,InspirationtoOthers awardandStoneinBloom. IntotalJaynehascol- lectedapproximately14awardsandadmitsnoneof itwouldhavebeenpossiblewithoutherwalker. “Fromtheageof5Ihadaninterestingardening andIwasdeterminedthatmystrokewouldnot stopmedoingthethingIloveasItrulybelieveitis notaboutwhatyoucan’tdobutwhatyoucando. ThedesignandstabilityoftheWalkerallowsmeto JayneSmithfromStone,Staffordshireisagreatexampleofsomeonewhoisrefusingtolet herdisabilitystandinthewayofherpassionforgardening. Walker helps gardeners to award success To find out more seniorlifenews.com NEWS “From the age of 5 I had an interest in gardening and I was determined that my stroke would not stop me doing the thing I love” patient@patientVisit www.patient.info 18 million people a month trust our health information C M Y CM MY CY CMY K generic-ad-100.8-112.pdf 1 16/06/2015 10:20:12 Do you need a break? Tourismisgettingeasierforseniorsand peoplewithphysicalandsensoryneeds D on’tletageorworriesaboutacces- sibilitydeteryoufromtaking leisurebreaks.Manytourist destinations,attractionsand accommodationprovidersare usedtodealingwithseniorsandpeoplewith accessibilityneeds. VisitEnglandfiguresshowthat9.8mover- nighttripsweretakenbyBritonswithanim- pairmentinEnglandalonein2013and271m daytripsincludedapartymemberwithanim- pairment.Domesticovernighttripsbydisabled travellersandtheircompanionsincreasedby 19percentinthefouryearsto2013andover-55s took14mdomesticholidaysinEnglandin2013– 26percentmorethanin2006. “Thekeytoplanningasuccessfultripforpe- oplewithphysicalandsensoryneedsisinforma- tion,andweareencouragingtourismbusines- sestoimprovetheiraccessibilityinformation” saysRossCalladine,whoisresponsibleforacces- sibletourismasheadofbusinesssupportat VisitEngland. Whenchoosingadestination,considerthese- venareasofEnglandwhereselectedbusinesses suchashotels,B&Bs,attractionsandfoodand drinkoutletsaretakingpartintheAccessforAll project,aimingtoincreaseaccessibility. These destinations currently cover Brigh- ton, Margate, Nottinghamshire, Northum- berland, Derbyshire, and the cities of Lincoln and Birmingham. Areas which have already been involved are Newcastle/Gateshead, Bath, and Leicestershire.All are home to businesses which have committed to increasing accessibility. Whereveryourdestination,however,lookfor businesseswithaccessstatementsontheirweb- sites.Theyofferdetailsaboutthevenue’saccessi- bility,suchasseatingatreception,hearingloops, largeprintmenus,orwaystogettodifferentareas ofthebuilding.“Insomecasesvenueshaveused newtechnologysuchasvirtualtoursonscreens andtabletstoprovideinterpretationoflessacces- sibleareas”saysCalladine. Lookforaccommodationwhichdisplaysthe yellowlogooftheNationalAccessibleScheme, whichincludesover400businesseswithimpro- vedaccessibility. ConsulttheAccessforAllAward WinnersBrochuretofindalistoftouristattrac- tionsandaccommodationthathavewon theawardforgoingtheextramileto ensureaccessibility. ForhelpwithplanningtripsseetheVisitEng- landandTourismforAllwebsites.Manylocaltou- ristboardwebsitesalsoallowyoutosearchforbu- sinesseswithaccessibilityinformation. Followthesetipstoenjoydaytripsandleisurebreakswithfeweraccessworries carrysmallbagsofcompost,plantpots,garden toolsetcaroundthegardenandIalsousethe walkertohelpmeaccesstheborderswhenlo- weringmyselftothegroundandgettingback upagain. Despitethepathwayinmygardenbe- inguneventhewalkerisalwaysstableandpro- videsmewiththepeaceofmindandconfidence Ineed”continuedJayne. Jayneisatrueinspirationandwearedeligh- tedtohearabouthercontinuedhorticulturalsuc- cess. Webelievethatawalkercanopenupawho- leworldofopportuntiesthatmightotherwisenot beaccessibleduetoalackofmobilityorconfiden- ce andJayneisafantasticexampleofthis. THINKSTOCKPHOTOS By Geoff Morris PHOTO: UNISCAN By Linda Whitney
  8. 8. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT10 SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK MEDIAPLANET NEWS O ften the hardest decision to make when considering wri- ting a Will is finding a profes- sional who has the necessa- ry knowledge, expertise and who you can trust to carry out the work for you. The Society of Will Writers was established in 1994 to offer an independent regulatory fram- ework for Will Writers and Estate Planning Pro- fessionals. The SWW’s ranks now number 1800 members and it is estimated that our mem- bers write in excess of 200,000 wills a year. Our role as a self-regulatory organisation means that the consumer can have confiden- ce in using one of our members, the same way they would a solicitor. SWW members adhe- re to a strict code of practice, train on an an- nual basis, and hold professional indemni- ty insurance as mandatory requirements. Once you’ve made steps towards using a regulated professional you need to decide how you would like to distribute your estate. Remember that your Will must be a paper do- cument with a ‘wet’ signature. It must be wit- nessed and signed properly to be a valid docu- ment. Thorough and careful thought should be given to the distribution of your estate. With evermore complex family situa- tions it is important to have a clear idea about how you would like to distribute your perso- nal effects. It is not always as simple as lea- ving a gift to a relative. There may be squabb- les after you have passed and your Will should be clear as possible to avoid any ambiguity. Aprofessionalwillhelpyousetthisoutinpaper. If you work with a professional to have your Willdraftedtheywillmaketheprocessassimp- le as possible and it is their job to help you plan for the future. Will Writers or Estate Planning Consultants are experts when it comes to suc- cessionlaw.Thisisafieldinwhichtheyarespe- cifically trained and continue to update their technical knowledge. They will help you with all the possible factors you may need to think about when considering the distribution of your estate. This will include the appointment of guardians, executors and trustees. They will adviseyouonhowtoeffectivelyprovideforyour family and they will give advice on how to mi- tigate your tax liability. A Will writer can help you set up a trust fund to provide for your child- ren, grandchildren, make provision for your pets,ortoleavemoneytoacharityorgoodcause. As a lay person (someone who is not adept in Will writing) you are not expected to un- derstand the changes in legislation and the ef- fects that they can have on your estate. In the lastyearalonewehaveseenchangestothelaws ofintestacy,whichdefinewhereyourestatewill pass if you were to die without a Will or if a gift failed because of an invalid clause in your Will. There have also been changes to the rules go- verning the provision of care for the elderly or vulnerable as introduced by the Care Act. Addi- tionally, 17th of August brings about the intro- duction to a European regulation (Brussels IV) governing cross-border succession. This will have an impact on those that have holiday ho- mesorpropertyinotherEuropeanjurisdictions. Generallywedonotwanttothinkaboutour mortalityandmakingawill.Ifyouhaven’tgota Willyetthenyoumakeuppartofthe67percentof theUKadultpopulationwithoutone Leavinga legacyand writinga will “With evermore complex family situations it is important to have a clear idea about how you would like to distribute your personal effects” What is probate and when is it required? By Carmen Cottingham SWW Trust Corporation A Grant of Probate is an order from the High Court of Justice which provides the legal authority to the Executors or Administrators to distribute the estate of a deceased person. Generally, Probate (Letters of Adminis- tration) is required when the deceased held more than £5,000, held property solely or as tenants in common, owned stocks and shares and held certain insu- rance policies. A Grant of Probate will also be requi- red where the deceased benefited from a trust during their lifetime. A Grant of Probate is not always requi- red for example, if the deceased’s assets were held jointly with someone else. In these circumstances the assets will pass over to the other party under the term ‘survivorship’. The probate process can be an onerous one especially for close friends or family members who are appointed as the Ex- ecutors. Their duties include the preser- vation of assets in the estate, payment of all of the estates liabilities, maintenance and often sale of the property and finally distribution of the estate according to the terms of the Will or the Intestacy Rules. PHOTO: THINKSTOCK By Thomas Stansfield, Society of Will Writers
  9. 9. Ever since 1753 the British Museum has told the story of human cultural achievement, from the dawn of human history over two million years ago to the present. By leaving a donation in your Will you can help us to continue telling that story to future generations. As a charity we rely on the generosity of people like you. For more information, please call 020 7323 8421 or email legacymanager@britishmuseum.org Let us tell your story This enamelled gold locket is called the ‘Lyte Jewel’. It was bequeathed to the British Museum by Baron Ferdinand Rothschild in 1898 as part of the Waddesdon Bequest. Set with diamonds, it contains a miniature portrait of James VI (of Scotland) and I (of England) by Nicholas Hilliard. Made in London, 1610–1611. Legacy_advert.indd 1 23/06/2015 16:24 leave agift... and be remembered. One man’s legacy has been keeping children safe for over 145 years. Yours can do the same. Will you help? For more information about remembering Action for Children in your Will: actionforchildren.org.uk/legacies legacies@actionforchildren.org.uk 0300 123 2112 Registered charity nos. 1097940/SC038092. Company no. 4764232. 14/15 0353 actionforchildrenactnforchildren actionforchildrenUK actionforchildrenactnforchildren actionforchildrenUK When Thomas Bowman Stephenson arrived in London in 1869 he couldn’t believe how many homeless children there were. He set up the National Children’s Home to reach out and support children across the UK. Today we are Action for Children and we work relentlessly to fix problems early and give every child and young person the love, support and opportunity they need to unlock their potential. Thanks to the generous support of amazing people just like you, who leave a gift to Action for Children in their Will, we make children’s lives better – now, tomorrow and every day. Despite Rethink Mental Illness’ amazingwork,therearestillover1.5 million people affected by mental illness such as schizophrenia, bi- polar and personality disorder in this country. ByagreeingtoleaveagifttoRethink Mental Illness in your will you can help give us the guaranteed funds we need to pay for crucial services today and tomorrow. It means that any gift, no matter how large or small, will help to provide essential care and support for people affected by mental illness now and for generations to come. The difference your legacy will make Call us now on 020 7840 3032 or visit www.rethink.org/legacy Reg. Charity No. 271028
  10. 10. Ever since 1753 the British Museum has told the story of human cultural achievement, from the dawn of human history over two million years ago to the present. By leaving a donation in your Will you can help us to continue telling that story to future generations. As a charity we rely on the generosity of people like you. For more information, please call 020 7323 8421 or email legacymanager@britishmuseum.org Let us tell your story This enamelled gold locket is called the ‘Lyte Jewel’. It was bequeathed to the British Museum by Baron Ferdinand Rothschild in 1898 as part of the Waddesdon Bequest. Set with diamonds, it contains a miniature portrait of James VI (of Scotland) and I (of England) by Nicholas Hilliard. Made in London, 1610–1611. Legacy_advert.indd 1 23/06/2015 16:24 leave agift... and be remembered. One man’s legacy has been keeping children safe for over 145 years. Yours can do the same. Will you help? For more information about remembering Action for Children in your Will: actionforchildren.org.uk/legacies legacies@actionforchildren.org.uk 0300 123 2112 Registered charity nos. 1097940/SC038092. Company no. 4764232. 14/15 0353 actionforchildrenactnforchildren actionforchildrenUK actionforchildrenactnforchildren actionforchildrenUK When Thomas Bowman Stephenson arrived in London in 1869 he couldn’t believe how many homeless children there were. He set up the National Children’s Home to reach out and support children across the UK. Today we are Action for Children and we work relentlessly to fix problems early and give every child and young person the love, support and opportunity they need to unlock their potential. Thanks to the generous support of amazing people just like you, who leave a gift to Action for Children in their Will, we make children’s lives better – now, tomorrow and every day. Despite Rethink Mental Illness’ amazingwork,therearestillover1.5 million people affected by mental illness such as schizophrenia, bi- polar and personality disorder in this country. ByagreeingtoleaveagifttoRethink Mental Illness in your will you can help give us the guaranteed funds we need to pay for crucial services today and tomorrow. It means that any gift, no matter how large or small, will help to provide essential care and support for people affected by mental illness now and for generations to come. The difference your legacy will make Call us now on 020 7840 3032 or visit www.rethink.org/legacy Reg. Charity No. 271028
  11. 11. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT12 SENIORLEIFENEWS.CO.UK MEDIAPLANET 13 CORDLESS HEDGE TRIMMERS THE POWER OF PETROL THE CONVENIENCE OF CORDLESS £199(INC 2.0AH BATTERY & CHARGER) See the Freedom48 range online at www.mountfieldlawnmowers.co.uk Call: 0845 600 3207 MM48Li LONG REACH HEDGE TRIMMER & POLE PRUNER £259 (INC 2.0AH BATTERY & CHARGER) SAVE £44 48 VOLT SAVE £34 THE NEW FREEDOM48 RANGE - NINE CORLDLESS TOOLS ONE 48 VOLT BATTERY. The RNLI is the charity that saves lives at sea Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI), a charity registered in England andWales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Registered charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland. If you would like to know more about helping the RNLI’s courageous crews with a gift in your Will, please contact the Gifts in Wills Team on 0300 300 0124 IS/06/15 It will be the lifeboat that launches to answer a call for help, the training that helps our volunteer crews reach a vessel in distress and the rope that pulls someone out of the water to safety. It will save lives at sea. 5 NEWS AboutTracyFoster Keeping your garden accessible Tracy Foster began gardening when she was just seven years old – claiming a little section of her parents’ garden. Since then she has turned her childhood love into a highly successful and fulfilling career – creating some beautiful, memorable and purposeful gardens. Sheholdsadegreeinplantbiologyfrom theUniversityofNewcastleuponTyneand adiplomaingardendesignfromtheInstitu- teofGardenDesign. Sheisalsoaregistered memberoftheSocietyofGardenDesigners andstillfindstimetogivetalks,runcourses andworkshopsingardendesignaswellas actingasamentorfortheSocietyof GardenDesigners. Duringhercareershehaswonnumerous awardsforhergardendesignsincluding aGoldMedalandPeople’sChoiceAward forBestSmallGardenattheRHSHamp- tonCourtPalaceFlowerShowin2014and theChelseaGoldMedalandPeople’sChoice MedalattheRHSChelseaFlowerShow. Andifthisdoesnotkeepherbusyenough, Tracyalsowritesarticles,hasmadeTVap- pearancesandspokenasagardenexpert onlocalradio.ShelivesinLeeds,WestYork- shireandispartofawonderfulcommunity gardeninggroupinwhichbothretiredand workingvolunteersbringawealthofcreati- vityandpracticalskillstoencourageothers toenjoygardening. T hissummer,award- winninggardende- signerTracyFoster andJustRetirement Limited,aleadingspe- cialistinretirement productsandservi- ces,willunveilashowgardenatRHS HamptonCourtPalaceFlowerShow(30 June-5July)thatcelebratesthejoysofre- tirement.AGardenforEveryRetireewill depicttheeverydaygardenofanactive, creativeretiree,demonstratingjusthow enjoyableretirement,andgardening, canbe.Here,RHSGoldmedal-winning Foster,andretirementspecialistsJust Retirement,sharetheirtoptipsforcrea- tingagardenwhichreflectsthediffering needsofretireesintheUKtoday. Fosterexplains:“Retirementcan providethetimetodevelopagarden richinsensoryelementswhichevo- kepowerfulandpleasurablememories andexperiences.Asweage,someofour sensescanbecomelesssharp,butwith thoughtfulplantingandlandscaping, agardenistheperfectplaceto stimulatethem.” Award-winninggardendesignerTracyFosterand retirementspecialistJustRetirementLtdteamupto providetheirtopfivetipsforgardeningthissummer. Agardenfor everyretiree 3 Taste:Growingherbsisaneasyundertakingforagardenerofanyexpe- rience.Theydon’trequireasmuchspaceasavegetablepatchbutaddplen- tyofflavourtoyourmeals.Ifyouhavemoretimeonyourhandsandare lookingtostarta‘growyourown’sectionthenwhynotstartwithorega- no,sage,fennel,thyme,chivesandrosemary. 2Sound: Encouragingnatureintoyourgardenwillprovideanaturalcho- rusofsoundstoneutraliseurbannoiseifyouarespendingmoretimeat home.Placingseatingneartowaterfeaturesprovidesabackdropofrelax- ingtones,andcrunchygravelorcrushedshellmulchprovideaudibletex- tureunderfoot. Smell: Scenthasastrongassociationwithmemorysobesuretoinclu- descentedplantsaroundyourgarden.Scentedclimberslikejasmineand honeysuckle,orrosesaroundarchesanddoorwaysprovidescentathead height.Ifyoustrugglewithyourmobility,thenraisedbedsareagoodop- tionwhileseatedasyoucanworkonthemwhileseated,allowingscented flowerstobringtheirperfumesclosertoyou. 4Touch: Lamb’seariswoollyandsofttotouch–greatifyouhaveyoung grandchildrenexploringyourgarden.Andsurfacessuchassmoothpebb- leswarmedbythesun,coolgranitecopings,carvedwoodorpolishedme- talcanallbringinterestingtexturesintothegardentoo. 1Sight:Forthosewithpooreyesight,flowers,fencingandfurnitureinthe coloursofblue,whiteandyellowcanworkbest,whileberries,barkandfo- liageaddnaturalcolourthroughouttheseasons,andtheuseofevergreens provideall-year-roundstructuretoyourspace. Retirement can also provide an opportunity to develop an accessible garden which can be enjoyed for many more years to come. lThinkaboutnewgarden-relatedhobbiesyoumightlike totakeupinyournewleisuretime,suchasbeekeeping, willowweavingorkeepingchickens.Gardenscanbe easilyadaptedtoincorporatespacefornewactivities. lAdaptedtoolscansaveyouasorebackortiredarms–do yourresearchtofindoutwhichonessuityoubest. lGrowingyourownvegetablescansaveyoumoney,in- creasetheamountofexerciseyoudoandgetmoreheal- thyfoodintoyourdiet. lGardeningwiththegrandchildrencanigniteanear- lypassionforgardeningandcreatetreasuredmemories. lIfyoustruggletogetoutsideallthetime,thinkabout placingsomebeautifulfeaturesnearthebackdoorso thatyoucanseethemallyearround. COLUMN It takes three weeks to build a show garden & two weeks to build a small garden at the Hampton Court Palace Flower Show PHOTO: RHS/ BETHANY CLARKE PHOTO: TRACY FOSTER PHOTO: TRACY FOSTER PHOTO: TRACY FOSTER
  12. 12. A SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE INDEPENDENT14 SENIORLIFENEWS.CO.UK Risk Warning: The value of your investment can go up or down and you may get back less than your initial investment. Syndicate Room Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (No. 613021). Find out more online www.syndicateroom.com Invest with the Angels Thepensionreformsmeanthatthoseapproachingretirementnowhavegreaterflexibilityoverwhat theycandowiththeirpensionsavings.Itisevenmoreimportanttoconsiderhowmuchmoneyyou willneedtomaintainthelifestyleyou’dlikeforthefulllengthofyourretirement.You’llalsoneedto considerincome,taxandinheritance Pensionsreforms andplanning NEWS Dipping in and out – taking small cash sums Youcanleaveyourpensionpotinvested andtakeoutlumpsumswhenyouneed them.Thefirst25percentofanywithdra- walistax-freeandtherestistaxable.Not allschemesprovidethisoptionandsome providersallowyouamaximumnumber ofwithdrawalseachyear.Becausethein- vestmentsinyourexistingpensionpot arenotdesignedtoproducearegularre- tirementincomeandthevalueofthese investmentscouldfallit’sespeciallyim- portanttokeepthemunderregularre- viewtoreducethechancesofrunningout ofmoney. Buy an annuity Alifetimeannuityprovidesyouwithare- gularretirementincomeforlife–withthe guaranteethatthemoneywon’trunout beforeyoudie. Therearedifferenttypesof annuitiesavailable: • Basiclifetimeannuitiesofferarangeof incomeoptionstosuitdifferentperso- nalcircumstancesandattitudestorisk. • With investment- linked annuities, your income will vary depending on the performance of the funds your annuity invests in. • Flexible annuities offer flexibility over income payments, investment options and death benefits. It’s important you choose the type and features best suited to your per- sonal circumstances, your life expec- tancy and your attitude to risk. Shop around! You can take up to 25 per cent of your pension pot as a tax-free lump sum and use the rest to buy an annuity. Flexible income drawdown With a flexible income drawdown your money is placed in various in- vestments and you can draw an in- come from this that suits you. This scheme can be with your own or an- other provider. Although you can choose how much income and what lump sums you take, the income is not guaranteed for life. If your invest- ments fall in value you may have to adjust the amounts you take so you don’t run out of money later on. Youcanchoosetotakeupto25percent ofyourpensionpotasatax-freelump sumattheoutsetandyouthenpayyour highestrateoftaxonanywithdrawals. Leave your pension pot untouched Ifyoualreadyhaveenoughincometoli- veon,youmaybeabletodelayusingyour pensionpotbeyondyourselectedretire- mentdate,oryourscheme’snormalreti- rementdate.Youcancontinuetogettax reliefonpensionsavingsofupto£40,000 eachyear(taxyear2015-16)untilage75and yourpotwillcontinuetogrowuntilyou needit Mix your options Youdon’thavetochooseoneoptionwhen decidinghowtoaccessyourpension–you canmixandmatchasyoulike,andtake cashandincomeatdifferenttimestosuit yourneeds.Whicheveroptionyouchoose, besuretokeepyourfundsunderregular reviewsotheycontinuetomeetyourlong- termretirementincomeneeds. To find out more seniorlifenews.com By Money Advice Service
  13. 13. Guaranteed 50% ROI over 5 years! Exclusive Offer New Builds Only....... £65k! Email: sales@mullacottpark.co.uk web: www.devonlodgeparks.co.uk Freephone 0800 085 3983 UNIQUE FEATURES • 99 year license agreement • Flexible Packages from £5,000 • No hidden charges • Quarterly payments OPTIONS • Rent it • Sell it • Keep it • Choice of 3 parks in Devon • Equity release scheme THE BENEFITS • ROI up to 250% • 10% guaranteed annual rental income • 3 exit routes

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