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Trust Building in Sales: The risky technique that will fast-track you to trusted advisor status

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This Slideshare reveals one of the most commonly overlooked - yet hugely important - aspects of the sales cycle. Discover how you can take the lead from your competition and set your sales relationships up for future success.

For follow-up content, check out our interview with Charles H. Green, co-author of Trusted Advisor: https://www.salesforce.com/uk/blog/2015/09/mastering-trust-in-sales-relationships-charles-green.html

Published in: Business

Trust Building in Sales: The risky technique that will fast-track you to trusted advisor status

  1. 1. The secret ingredient of Trust-Building in Sales The risky technique that will fast-track you to ‘trusted advisor’ status
  2. 2. If you’re reading this, it means you care about sales.
  3. 3. If you’re reading this, it means you care about sales. (That probably makes you a good rep.)
  4. 4. But many good reps stop short of being great — because they’re missing a key ingredient:
  5. 5. Reps that are consistently trusted by clients and prospects:
  6. 6. Close deals faster. A trusted rep needs less time to get proposals considered and accepted.
  7. 7. Spend less time chasing business. A trusted rep doesn’t have to wait for RFPs; clients actively contact them for advice.
  8. 8. Create more opportunities. A trusted rep gets more referrals to customers’ colleagues and contacts.
  9. 9. So far, so obvious.
  10. 10. TRUST. But there’s one key element of trust-building that almost everyone fails to apply.
  11. 11. TRUST. And because they don’t apply it, they miss out on the biggest and best opportunities.
  12. 12. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement.
  13. 13. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably:
  14. 14. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably: Engaged with the prospect
  15. 15. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably: Engaged with the prospect Listened to their challenges
  16. 16. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably: Engaged with the prospect Listened to their challenges Framed their challenges in a rational way
  17. 17. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably: Engaged with the prospect Listened to their challenges Framed their challenges in a rational way Envisioned a future in which these challenges were solved
  18. 18. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably: Engaged with the prospect Listened to their challenges Framed their challenges in a rational way Envisioned a future in which these challenges were solved Committed to delivering a solution.
  19. 19. Think of how you worked to develop trust in your last sales engagement. You probably: Engaged with the prospect Listened to their challenges Framed their challenges in a rational way Envisioned a future in which these challenges were solved Committed to delivering a solution. These are all great ways to build trust with your clients and prospects.
  20. 20. But if you only do these five things, you’re not building the kind of trust that keeps clients coming back to you time and again.
  21. 21. Here’s why:
  22. 22. Business decisions are never purely rational. They’re made by people with normal, human fears, worries and insecurities.
  23. 23. Lots of challenges remain unspoken. Almost every complex sales situation has at least one ‘elephant in the room’.
  24. 24. Your role is not just to provide a logical solution. Prospects secretly want help with their emotional and political issues, too.
  25. 25. The best reps know there’s one more thing you need to do to gain the client’s complete trust:
  26. 26. The best reps know there’s one more thing you need to do to gain the client’s complete trust:
  27. 27. Most reps stop at rational framing: articulating the client’s explicit business challenge back to them, clearly and concisely.
  28. 28. Very few articulate the unspoken concerns they sense in the room.
  29. 29. Very few articulate the unspoken concerns they sense in the room. And it’s no wonder why.
  30. 30. Emotional framing is hard. And it’s no wonder why.
  31. 31. Emotional framing is hard. Really hard.And it’s no wonder why.
  32. 32. You’re raising issues that no one wants to be the first to raise.
  33. 33. It takes courage,
  34. 34. It takes courage, confidence,
  35. 35. humility humility It takes courage, confidence, and humility.
  36. 36. You have to forget (temporarily) about the deal.
  37. 37. Forget about yourself and what’s at stake for you.
  38. 38. And put all your focus on surfacing the problem. In a respectful and tactful way.
  39. 39. So… If you see a decision-maker furrowing his or her brow
  40. 40. So… If you see a decision-maker furrowing his or her brow If you hear sighing or tutting
  41. 41. So… If you see a decision-maker furrowing his or her brow If you hear sighing or tutting If you see meaningful glances being exchanged
  42. 42. So… If you see a decision-maker furrowing his or her brow If you hear sighing or tutting If you see meaningful glances being exchanged If you sense anything unspoken that might derail the decision.
  43. 43. Get it out into the open. But do it carefully and sensitively.
  44. 44. Use ‘naming and claiming’ phrases to raise the issues in a safe way: “Is it just me, or…”
  45. 45. Use ‘naming and claiming’ phrases to raise the issues in a safe way: “Is it just me, or…” “I may not have followed this completely, but I get the feeling…”
  46. 46. Use ‘naming and claiming’ phrases to raise the issues in a safe way: “Is it just me, or…” “I may not have followed this completely, but I get the feeling…” “I hope I’m not stepping out of line bringing this up, but I’m getting the feeling that…
  47. 47. Never place blame. Your aim is to surface and fix underlying issues. You should never make anyone feel picked-on or uncomfortable.
  48. 48. Always aim for a solution. Help the people in the room to agree actions they can take to address the emotional issues. For real life examples, check out our blog post.
  49. 49. Emotional framing is tough…
  50. 50. …but it’s worth it: Dealsclosefaster–andfewergoto‘nodecision’
  51. 51. …but it’s worth it: Dealsclosefaster–andfewergoto‘nodecision’ Customerscomebacktoyouforadvice
  52. 52. …but it’s worth it: Dealsclosefaster–andfewergoto‘nodecision’ Customerscomebacktoyouforadvice Yougetinvolvedinbiggerandmorestrategicpurchasingdecisions
  53. 53. …but it’s worth it: Dealsclosefaster–andfewergoto‘nodecision’ Customerscomebacktoyouforadvice Yougetinvolvedinbiggerandmorestrategicpurchasingdecisions Youbuildlonger-lastinganddeeperrelationships
  54. 54. …but it’s worth it: Dealsclosefaster–andfewergoto‘nodecision’ Customerscomebacktoyouforadvice Yougetinvolvedinbiggerandmorestrategicpurchasingdecisions Youbuildlonger-lastinganddeeperrelationships Yougetmorereferralsandcross-sellopportunities.
  55. 55. Wouldn’t you like some of that?
  56. 56. We spoke to Charles Green, co-author of The Trusted Advisor, about techniques for building long-lasting trusting sales relationships. Read the interview

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