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  • The media has had a completely negative impact on women, especially young girls self image. We have unrealistic standards and expectations of beauty, with my project I wanted to help make people aware of the outrageous lies the media is feeding us about what we are “supposed” to look like. Every person is beautiful, not just the girls that we see in magazines. \n
  • Body image is the way a person thinks, feels and behaves in regards to their own physical appearance. The second part of body image is how a person deals with those feelings. 90% of women care enough about their looks to make an effort to improve them. At age thirteen, 53% of girls are unhappy with their bodies. By the time the girls reach age seventeen this grows to 78%.\n\n\n
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  • From an extremely young age girls are bombarded with images and ideas about what they should look like. Think about the most common toy for a young girl- a Barbie Doll. \n\nSome facts about Barbie:\n\nIf Barbie was a real person...\nShe would be 5’9” \nShe would be less than 110 lbs \nBarbie would have a BMI of 16.24- which is considered severely unhealthy and underweight \nShe would have a 39” bust, 18” waist, 33” thighs\nHer shoe size would be a size 3.\nHer 18 in waist would not allow enough room for all of her organs.\nBecause of her ridiculous proportions her frame would not be able to support such a large chest and she wouldn’t be able to walk upright – she would have to walk on all fours.\n\n\n\n\n
  • \n\n“Women who are exposed to images of other thin or attractive women have lower self-evaluations of their own appearance than women exposed to averaged-sized or unattractive women.” - Pruis, Trisha A, and Janowsky S Jeri. "Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls and Older Women.\n\n\n
  • \n•advertisements featuring female models are less likely to show a full body; emphasis is on specific parts of the body.\n•only 5% of female actresses in recurring roles on television were classified as heavy in comparison to 25.5% of male actors.\n\n Body Image Evaluation Study:\n\n-Body dissatisfaction correlated directly with the total time female adolescents spent viewing soap operas on television.\n-Teen girls and young women who considered fashion magazines to be an important sources of beauty and fitness information had greater levels of body dissatisfaction than those who felt these types of magazines were not important.\n-These female adolescents who believed fashion magazines were important sources of beauty and fitness information were more likely to develop\nweight control behaviors such as skipping meals.\n-The more exposure women have to media that shows a high proportion of ideal body images, the greater their likelihood of them to develop habits associated with eating disorders.\n\n
  • \n•advertisements featuring female models are less likely to show a full body; emphasis is on specific parts of the body.\n•only 5% of female actresses in recurring roles on television were classified as heavy in comparison to 25.5% of male actors.\n\n Body Image Evaluation Study:\n\n-Body dissatisfaction correlated directly with the total time female adolescents spent viewing soap operas on television.\n-Teen girls and young women who considered fashion magazines to be an important sources of beauty and fitness information had greater levels of body dissatisfaction than those who felt these types of magazines were not important.\n-These female adolescents who believed fashion magazines were important sources of beauty and fitness information were more likely to develop\nweight control behaviors such as skipping meals.\n-The more exposure women have to media that shows a high proportion of ideal body images, the greater their likelihood of them to develop habits associated with eating disorders.\n\n
  • \n•advertisements featuring female models are less likely to show a full body; emphasis is on specific parts of the body.\n•only 5% of female actresses in recurring roles on television were classified as heavy in comparison to 25.5% of male actors.\n\n Body Image Evaluation Study:\n\n-Body dissatisfaction correlated directly with the total time female adolescents spent viewing soap operas on television.\n-Teen girls and young women who considered fashion magazines to be an important sources of beauty and fitness information had greater levels of body dissatisfaction than those who felt these types of magazines were not important.\n-These female adolescents who believed fashion magazines were important sources of beauty and fitness information were more likely to develop\nweight control behaviors such as skipping meals.\n-The more exposure women have to media that shows a high proportion of ideal body images, the greater their likelihood of them to develop habits associated with eating disorders.\n\n
  • \n•advertisements featuring female models are less likely to show a full body; emphasis is on specific parts of the body.\n•only 5% of female actresses in recurring roles on television were classified as heavy in comparison to 25.5% of male actors.\n\n Body Image Evaluation Study:\n\n-Body dissatisfaction correlated directly with the total time female adolescents spent viewing soap operas on television.\n-Teen girls and young women who considered fashion magazines to be an important sources of beauty and fitness information had greater levels of body dissatisfaction than those who felt these types of magazines were not important.\n-These female adolescents who believed fashion magazines were important sources of beauty and fitness information were more likely to develop\nweight control behaviors such as skipping meals.\n-The more exposure women have to media that shows a high proportion of ideal body images, the greater their likelihood of them to develop habits associated with eating disorders.\n\n
  • \n•advertisements featuring female models are less likely to show a full body; emphasis is on specific parts of the body.\n•only 5% of female actresses in recurring roles on television were classified as heavy in comparison to 25.5% of male actors.\n\n Body Image Evaluation Study:\n\n-Body dissatisfaction correlated directly with the total time female adolescents spent viewing soap operas on television.\n-Teen girls and young women who considered fashion magazines to be an important sources of beauty and fitness information had greater levels of body dissatisfaction than those who felt these types of magazines were not important.\n-These female adolescents who believed fashion magazines were important sources of beauty and fitness information were more likely to develop\nweight control behaviors such as skipping meals.\n-The more exposure women have to media that shows a high proportion of ideal body images, the greater their likelihood of them to develop habits associated with eating disorders.\n\n
  • TV shows such as The Swan, Extreme Makeover and Nip/Tuck, that show self-improvement through plastic surgery, do not promote a healthy body image, but instead an easy fix for insecurities. \n
  • Researchers report that women’s magazines have ten and one-half times more ads and articles promoting weight loss than men’s magazines.\n Over three-quarters of the covers of women’s magazines include at least one message about how to change a woman’s bodily appearance—by diet, exercise or cosmetic surgery.\n\n
  • The average American woman is 5’4” tall and weighs 140 pounds.\n
  • The average American model is 5’11” tall and weighs 117 pounds.\n\n
  • Is this an accurate ‘Model’ of women?\n
  • THIN IDEAL BODY\n•The gap between Americas definition of the ideal female shape and the actual size of women's bodies is increasing.\n•The average American woman under 30 has become progressively heavier through out the years, but media images of women have become progressively thinner. For example, an examination of models appearing in the magazines “Ladies Home Journal” and “Vogue” revealed that the bust-to-waist ratios of women models had decreased steadily since 1949\n•“69.% of female actors appearing in popular television programs were classified as thin in comparison to 17.5% of male actors.” Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation\n\n\n\n
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  • I am going to show you a series of before and after photoshopped images...\n
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  • The media is showing us bodies that do not even exist in real life. \n
  • Reason for poor body image in older women\n•Women’s bodies change with age. \n•a shift in weight and fat distribution from the legs to the butt\n•an increase in fat mass\n•decrease in muscle mass \n•chronic health conditions impact how women view their bodies.\n•Older women are bothered by the weight gain caused by some medications and lament that they cannot hide some physical changes or deformities\n•older women still care about their appearance\n\n
  • Older women still deal negatively with poor body Image\n•They report using dieting, exercise, laxatives, diuretics, smoking, and dietary supplements to control their weight\n\n
  • Old compared to Young\n•The data in the Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls and Older Women suggests that body dissatisfaction\npersists throughout the lifespan, but the negative impact of such feelings may lessen with age.\n•Older women seem to place less importance on appearance then younger women.\n•there is more pressure on younger women to look a certain way based on the medias depiction of young women in television and magazines. \n•The drive for thinness was higher in younger than older women.\n•However, younger and older women had similar ideas about what body types are ideal. \n•The number of women that experienced body dissatisfaction did not differ between age groups, but the younger women were more likely to do something to change their appearance. \n\n
  • Sociocultural Theory \n•Sociocultural theory says that women's dissatisfaction with\ntheir physical appearance stems from:\n1. The ideal thin body type.\n2. The fact that cultures have promoted the female body as an object. \n3. The ‘perks’ that go along with being considered attractive and the negativity associated with being unattractive. \n\n
  • Although only about 8% of adolescents engaged in extreme weight control behaviors such as vomiting or laxative use, 45% of adolescents engaged\nin less extreme but still extremely unhealthy weight control behaviors such as fasting, severely restricting food intake, and smoking to remain thin.\n\nA negative body image causes a person to have low self esteem, problems with have normal relationships with friends, eating disorders, eating disturbances and body dysmorphic disorder. \n\n\n
  • Although only about 8% of adolescents engaged in extreme weight control behaviors such as vomiting or laxative use, 45% of adolescents engaged\nin less extreme but still extremely unhealthy weight control behaviors such as fasting, severely restricting food intake, and smoking to remain thin.\n\nA negative body image causes a person to have low self esteem, problems with have normal relationships with friends, eating disorders, eating disturbances and body dysmorphic disorder. \n\n\n
  • Although only about 8% of adolescents engaged in extreme weight control behaviors such as vomiting or laxative use, 45% of adolescents engaged\nin less extreme but still extremely unhealthy weight control behaviors such as fasting, severely restricting food intake, and smoking to remain thin.\n\nA negative body image causes a person to have low self esteem, problems with have normal relationships with friends, eating disorders, eating disturbances and body dysmorphic disorder. \n\n\n
  • The number of girls and women with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder is estimated at 60,000. -Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114 \n\nAnorexia- an eating disorder in which the person refuses to maintain a healthy body weight, and therefore starves themselves because of an obsessive fear of gaining weight.\n\nBulimia- is a disorder in which a person binges on food or has regular episodes of significant overeating and then finds a way to purge the food.\n\nBinge Eating- is a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusually large and unhealthy amounts of food. \n\n\n
  • The number of girls and women with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder is estimated at 60,000. -Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114 \n\nAnorexia- an eating disorder in which the person refuses to maintain a healthy body weight, and therefore starves themselves because of an obsessive fear of gaining weight.\n\nBulimia- is a disorder in which a person binges on food or has regular episodes of significant overeating and then finds a way to purge the food.\n\nBinge Eating- is a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusually large and unhealthy amounts of food. \n\n\n
  • The number of girls and women with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder is estimated at 60,000. -Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114 \n\nAnorexia- an eating disorder in which the person refuses to maintain a healthy body weight, and therefore starves themselves because of an obsessive fear of gaining weight.\n\nBulimia- is a disorder in which a person binges on food or has regular episodes of significant overeating and then finds a way to purge the food.\n\nBinge Eating- is a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusually large and unhealthy amounts of food. \n\n\n
  • The number of girls and women with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder is estimated at 60,000. -Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114 \n\nAnorexia- an eating disorder in which the person refuses to maintain a healthy body weight, and therefore starves themselves because of an obsessive fear of gaining weight.\n\nBulimia- is a disorder in which a person binges on food or has regular episodes of significant overeating and then finds a way to purge the food.\n\nBinge Eating- is a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusually large and unhealthy amounts of food. \n\n\n
  • The number of girls and women with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder is estimated at 60,000. -Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114 \n\nAnorexia- an eating disorder in which the person refuses to maintain a healthy body weight, and therefore starves themselves because of an obsessive fear of gaining weight.\n\nBulimia- is a disorder in which a person binges on food or has regular episodes of significant overeating and then finds a way to purge the food.\n\nBinge Eating- is a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusually large and unhealthy amounts of food. \n\n\n
  • Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) \n\nPeople who suffer from BDD see themselves different than the rest of the world sees them. When they look into the mirror they see a morphed version of \nthemselves. It usually arising in adolescence. \n\nThey can develop an addiction to plastic surgery, continually seeking to alter an imaginary imperfection. \n\nCommon complaints among people suffering from this disorder include imagined or slight flaws of the face or head (thinning hair, acne, wrinkles, scars, pallor or a flushed complexion, and the wrong size or shape of facial features.) \n\nThese people usually spend several hours a day obsessing over their perceived deformity.\n\nIn extreme cases, patients will self-mutilate in attempts to try and fix their ‘deformity’ themselves. \n\nTreatment for BDD includes cognitive-behavioral therapy and antidepressants to help control compulsive behaviors.\n\n\n
  • •Dr. Francis Palmer\n•Plastic Surgeon \n•Point system to determine perfect beauty\n•There are 100 possible points\n•A women who gets 100/100 is considered perfect and ideal \n\n
  • oIdeal Cheeks 75 points \n♣Broad \n♣Round\nLow \nHow to grade: \ndraw an imaginary line from the pupil of your eye down toward your jaw. \nDraw a second line from the nostrils across your cheeks. \nThe bottom of the cheekbone should fall at or below the intersection of these lines. \n\n
  • Ideal Eyes/Eyebrows 10 points \nNo extra skin above eye, big eyes, eyebrows should be a pinky with above eye socket. \n\n
  • Lips 7 points \nPouty, upper lip three-fourths the size of the lower lip.\n\n
  • Jaw, Chin, Neck 2 points \nNeck-swanlike \nChin-small, unobtrusive\nJaw- even \n\n
  • Nose 2 points\nSleek slim and straight \n\n
  • Skin 2 points\nEven, clear \nOverall look 2 points\nFeatures look good together \n\n
  • unrealistic standards of beauty\nunattainable \n
  • For my application portion I helped Ms Darnell organize a student forum about body image. Two speakers, a girl Maria, and a guy Jake came in to talk to the students. Some of the topics they focused on were: value as a person, the media giving people false ideas about body image, the strength to understand what is actually true in the world, and confidence. \n
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  • Final Body Image Slide

    1. 1. Body Imagegirlsstudies.blogspot.com Stephanie Albert
    2. 2. Thesis http://skinnyblog.com/?p=3 • abagond.wordpress.com
    3. 3. What Is Body Image? vectorimage.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    4. 4. Personal Relevance
    5. 5. Dolls amazon.comMomgrind. "Women and Body Image:Ten Disturbing Facts." MomGrind. WordPress, 28 Jan. 2011. Web. 7 Mar. 2011. <http://momgrind.com/2009/01/28/
    6. 6. MediaInfluence thebudgetfashionista.com/archive/shrinking-models/ Pruis, Trisha A, and Janowsky S Jeri. "Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls and Older Women." Journal of General Psychology 137.3: 225-238. Escohost. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    7. 7. Media Influence asiaload.com vogue.com amansworldonline.com howtostopeating.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    8. 8. Media Influence asiaload.com vogue.com amansworldonline.com howtostopeating.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    9. 9. Media Influence asiaload.com vogue.com amansworldonline.com howtostopeating.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    10. 10. Media Influence asiaload.com vogue.com amansworldonline.com howtostopeating.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    11. 11. Media Influence asiaload.com vogue.com amansworldonline.com howtostopeating.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    12. 12. Media Influence asiaload.com vogue.com amansworldonline.com howtostopeating.com Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    13. 13. Makeover Shows http://www.dermaxime.com/cosmetic-surgery/ Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    14. 14. paiskincare.com Magazines www.examiner.com fitandfemale.typepad.com/ /thefreshdiet.wordpress.com skullbunnie.com The diet business: Banking on failure. (BBC News World Edition, Feb 5 2003).
    15. 15. Average Woman ggrightsize.com
    16. 16. Models fashionrat.com http://psycho-gourmet.blogspot.com/2009/06/scenes-from-history-of-hunger.html Momgrind. "Women and Body Image:Ten Disturbing Facts." MomGrind. WordPress, 28 Jan. 2011. Web. 7 Mar. 2011. <http://momgrind.com/2009/01/28/ women-body-image/>. zimbio.com
    17. 17. Accurate Model of Women? http://www.prscene.com/archives/249
    18. 18. Thin posh24.comMorrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    19. 19. • Media
    20. 20. Things are notalways as they
    21. 21. http://www.likecool.com/Madonna_Before_and_After_photoshop--Pic--Gear.html
    22. 22. https://witnessthis.wordpress.com/tag/clone-stamp-tool/
    23. 23. http://allieiswired.com/archives/2010/04/britney-spears-candies-before-after-photoshop/
    24. 24. diabetes.org.mx
    25. 25. http://www.chilloutpoint.com/misc/celebrities-before-and-after-photoshop.html
    26. 26. http://www.chilloutpoint.com/misc/celebrities-before-and-after-photoshop.html
    27. 27. Body Image in Older Women http://ellenbesso.com/tag/body-image http://www.thirdage.com/weight-loss/importance-maintaining-healthy-weight-older-women Pruis, Trisha A, and Janowsky S Jeri. "Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls and Older Women." Journal of General Psychology 137.3: 225-238. Escohost. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    28. 28. How They Deal Pruis, Trisha A, and Janowsky S Jeri. "Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1016645/Confessions-middle-aged-anorexic-How-eating-disorders-affecting-older-women-too.html and Older Women." Journal of General Psychology 137.3: 225-238. Escohost. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    29. 29. Older Women vs. Young Girls dove.com Pruis, Trisha A, and Janowsky S Jeri. "Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls and Older Women." Journal of General Psychology 137.3: 225-238. Escohost. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    30. 30. Sociocultural Theory Morrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    31. 31. Affects of Negative Body Image http://redashphault.glogster.com/NOT-DONE-920/ Reamer, Frederic, Ph.D. "Teens in Crisis." The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter: n. pag. EBSCO Eldercare. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    32. 32. Affects of Negative Body Image http://redashphault.glogster.com/NOT-DONE-920/ Reamer, Frederic, Ph.D. "Teens in Crisis." The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter: n. pag. EBSCO Eldercare. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    33. 33. Affects of Negative Body Image http://redashphault.glogster.com/NOT-DONE-920/ Reamer, Frederic, Ph.D. "Teens in Crisis." The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter: n. pag. EBSCO Eldercare. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    34. 34. Affects of Negative Body Image http://redashphault.glogster.com/NOT-DONE-920/ Reamer, Frederic, Ph.D. "Teens in Crisis." The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter: n. pag. EBSCO Eldercare. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    35. 35. Eating Disorders anorexiapictures.net Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114
    36. 36. Eating Disorders anorexiapictures.net Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114
    37. 37. Eating Disorders anorexiapictures.net Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114
    38. 38. Eating Disorders anorexiapictures.net Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114
    39. 39. Eating Disorders anorexiapictures.net Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114
    40. 40. Eating Disorders anorexiapictures.net Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114
    41. 41. Body Dysmorphic Disorder "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but so is the deformity." http://lauriekendrick.wordpress.com/2008/03/06/in-praise-of-meaty-women/ Hawaleshka, Danylo. "I HATE MY FAT LEGS." Macleans: n. pag. ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.
    42. 42. Point System to Rate Beauty A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18
    43. 43. Cheeks75 pts A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18 http://www.marshu.com/articles/americas-next-top-model-4-antm-cycle-4-winner-naima.php
    44. 44. Eyes 10 pts A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18 http://www.flickr.com/photos/williamtemple/3209605464/
    45. 45. Lips 7 pts armandhaydenkeegan.blogspot.com A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18
    46. 46. Jaw,Chin,Neck orangecountylipo.com A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18
    47. 47. Nose imageshack.com A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18
    48. 48. Overall zimbo.com A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18
    49. 49. • Evolution of Beauty
    50. 50. Results Of The Survey• How confident do you feel on an average day? 7• How often do you compare yourself to others physical appearance? Sometimes• Do you diet? No• Do you feel guilty after eating? Sometimes• I weigh myself? Rarely• I have dealt with an eating disorder? False• After watching TV I feel..Less confident about my body.• I feel the media portrays the average body type..False
    51. 51. Class Activity• Body Outline bestbuyledtv.com http://www.stllan.com/
    52. 52. Works CitedMorrison, Todd G, Kalin Rudolf, and Melanie A Morrison. "Body Image Evaluation ." Adolescence : n. pag. Ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. Pruis, Trisha A, and Janowsky S Jeri. "Assessment of Body Image in Young Girls and Older Women." Journal of General Psychology 137.3: 225-238. Escohost. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.Momgrind. "Women and Body Image:Ten Disturbing Facts." MomGrind. WordPress, 28 Jan. 2011. Web. 7 Mar. 2011. <http://momgrind.com/2009/01/28/ women-body-image/>. The Diet Business: Banking on failure. (BBC News World Edition, Feb 5 2003). Reamer, Frederic, Ph.D. "Teens in Crisis." The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter: n. pag. EBSCO Eldercare. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. Feminist Review, No. 68, Women and Mental Health (Summer, 2001), pp. 105-114 Hawaleshka, Danylo. "I HATE MY FAT LEGS." Macleans: n. pag. ebsco host. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. A Beauty Formula? People, 00937673, 5/10/2004, Vol. 61, Issue 18
    53. 53. Conclusion• Body Image

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