TALENT MANAGEMENT
IN
MANUFACTURING
T. Sairam Singh
Rajeev
Durga
Michael Jackson
AGENDA
 Introduction
 Talent Management. What is it? Why now?
 Talent management by workforce planning.
 Best practice...
INTRODUCTION:
 What is Talent Management?
Talent management refers to the anticipation
of required human capital for an o...
Talent Management
 TM introduced by Mc Kinsey consultants,
in 1997’s.
 TM is identified as the critical success
factor i...
What is Talent?
According to McKinsey; talent is
the sum of
a person’s abilities,
his or her intrinsic gifts,
skills, k...
Why Organizations Need Talent
Development?
 To compete effectively in a complex and dynamic
environment to achieve sustai...
HR and TM:
HUMAN RESOURCES
MANAGEMENT
TALENT MANAGEMENT
o Broad Scope (entire
employees)
o Emphasize egalitarianism
o Focu...
Future talent pools:
Deficit countries
Surplus countries
At equilibrium
Source: Global Talent 2021 Study conducted by Oxfo...
IVEY BUSINESS JOURNAL
BEST PRACTICES FOR MEETING
MANUFACTURING’S GLOBAL
TALENT CHALLENGE
by Ashok Divakaran , Matt Mani,
a...
THE CHALLENGE IN DEVELOPED
ECONOMIES…
▪ In mature economies, manufacturers are grappling with
aging workforces; talent sho...
…AND THE CHALLENGES IN
EMERGING ECONOMIES
▪ The talent pools in the BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, and China)
are be...
1. Innovation in talent sourcing
▪ Employ specialized headhunters: Specialized headhunters are
playing an increasingly act...
CONTINUED..
▪ Pursue alternative sourcing: More and more manufacturers are
recognizing that talent does not always need to...
2. Investment in global talent
competencies
▪ Globalize training and development: Training—including
formal classes, infor...
3. The cultivation of ‘glocal’
organizational cultures, brands,
and employee value propositions
▪ Sell the career and the ...
A REPORT BY DELOITTE.
TALENT MANAGEMENT BY
WORKFORCE PLANNING
REASONS FOR WORKFORCE
PLANNING
 Workforce planning helps companies focus on
proactively understanding the future talent a...
 In a nutshell, workforce planning can help
manufacturers find people, with the right skills,
in the right places, at the...
Aligned talent strategy
 The most important ways in which the
workforce will contribute to the
achievement of the busines...
Effective solutions
 Investment decisions translate into
well-designed programs that can
produce desired attraction,
deve...
Supportive talent infrastructure
 The service delivery model, technology,
knowledge and behaviors of leaders,
organizatio...
Building blocks of a workforce plan in
Talent Management
1. Critical workforce segments and
corresponding competencies - i...
Managing the Talent Crisis
in Global Manufacturing-
Strategies to attract and
engage generation Y
•Depleting talent pipeline in global
manufacturing
•Lack of employability
•China : plenty of oysters, few
pearls
•India: F...
Conclusion:
 Talent management is a continuous process.
 Talent management is a new rat for the hungry cats.
 The appli...
Talent management in manufactuting industries
Talent management in manufactuting industries
Talent management in manufactuting industries
Talent management in manufactuting industries
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Talent management in manufactuting industries

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  • In aggregate, we find equilibrium in China, Argentina, Mexico. We expect to find surpluses in India, South Africa, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Egypt. And we expect to find some of the biggest deficits in Japan, Italy, South Korea, the U.S. and Canada. The picture would differ if we drew the map by industry. For example, we would find a deficit of talent in China in wholesale and retail trade and in India in the construction industry. In the US, we would find a slight surplus in the real estate and mining sectors. Given the severity of the mismatch in most sectors in so many countries, companies will need new solutions. Solutions that can serve companies well today as well as in the future. One of the first things to consider is the sources of labor. Are there nontraditional labor pools who could fill gaps? Able people who might be retiring or leaving the workforce to rear a family never to come back. Establishing value propositions that appeal to these groups of people today could help address the critical skills gap. Over time, it will help address the broader issues. Organizations could also consider moving jobs. This may not bring the same labor cost arbitrage that it has today. And it may be required for different types of jobs . To make it work, perhaps jobs will need to be disaggregated and reconstructed in a way that makes them doable from a remote location.
  • Talent management in manufactuting industries

    1. 1. TALENT MANAGEMENT IN MANUFACTURING T. Sairam Singh Rajeev Durga Michael Jackson
    2. 2. AGENDA  Introduction  Talent Management. What is it? Why now?  Talent management by workforce planning.  Best practices for meeting manufacturing’s global talent challenge.  Managing the talent crisis in global manufacturing. Conclusion
    3. 3. INTRODUCTION:  What is Talent Management? Talent management refers to the anticipation of required human capital for an organization and the planning to meet those needs.  Right talent at Right place. Talent management includes a series of integrated systems of recruiting, performance management, maximizing employee potential, managing their strengths and developing retaining people with desired skills and aptitude
    4. 4. Talent Management  TM introduced by Mc Kinsey consultants, in 1997’s.  TM is identified as the critical success factor in corporate world.  TM focuses on Differentiated performance: A, B, C players influencing company performance and success. Identifying key positions in the organization. !!! Surveys show that firms recognize the
    5. 5. What is Talent? According to McKinsey; talent is the sum of a person’s abilities, his or her intrinsic gifts, skills, knowledge, experience , intelligence, judgment, attitude, character, drive, his or her ability to learn and grow.
    6. 6. Why Organizations Need Talent Development?  To compete effectively in a complex and dynamic environment to achieve sustainable growth.  To develop leaders for tomorrow from within an organization.  To maximize employee performance as a unique source of competitive advantage.  To empower employees: Cut down on high turnover rates. Reduce the cost of constantly hiring new people to train.
    7. 7. HR and TM: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT TALENT MANAGEMENT o Broad Scope (entire employees) o Emphasize egalitarianism o Focus on administrative functions o Transactional o Focus on systems with silo approach o Focus on segmentation (key group of core employees and key positions) o Focus on potential people o Focus on the attraction, development and retention of talent o Focus on integratation of HR systems
    8. 8. Future talent pools: Deficit countries Surplus countries At equilibrium Source: Global Talent 2021 Study conducted by Oxford Economics and Towers Watson, 2012.
    9. 9. IVEY BUSINESS JOURNAL BEST PRACTICES FOR MEETING MANUFACTURING’S GLOBAL TALENT CHALLENGE by Ashok Divakaran , Matt Mani, and Laird Post Featured | September / October 2012
    10. 10. THE CHALLENGE IN DEVELOPED ECONOMIES… ▪ In mature economies, manufacturers are grappling with aging workforces; talent shortages in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM); and outdated employee value propositions. ▪ In the U.S., Japan, Germany, and the U.K., more than half the working population will be older than 40 by 2015, posing a significant loss of institutional knowledge as older workers retire and their seniority commands higher wages and benefits. ▪ To add to this conundrum, more expertise is needed on the factory floor than ever before. Manufacturing itself is becoming more technologically complex with the adoption of ever more sophisticated machinery, robotics, and process- control software
    11. 11. …AND THE CHALLENGES IN EMERGING ECONOMIES ▪ The talent pools in the BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) are becoming shallower, with companies in every industry reporting that the lack of skilled employees and rapidly rising salary expectations are crimping their ability to operate and expand. In high-growth manufacturing centers like Shanghai, the war for talent is further fueled by consistently high employee attrition rates, despite large pay increases and other perks. ▪ Leadership pipelines are under developed, as a result, manufacturers are being forced to bid up for the few qualified local candidates or import highly expensive expatriate managers. Emerging-economy manufacturers are further challenged by the knowledge management requirements of globally dispersed business models ▪ By 2025, 60-75 percent of the workforce in the BRIC countries will be members of GenerationY, people born roughly between the late 1970s and the late 1990s who bring drastically different priorities and expectations to work than older population segments.
    12. 12. 1. Innovation in talent sourcing ▪ Employ specialized headhunters: Specialized headhunters are playing an increasingly active role within corporate human resource organizations in manufacturing firms. For instance, the automotive supplier and building efficiency product manufacturing company, Johnson Controls (JCI), has a specialized global talent research team charged with proactively identifying candidates for essential jobs in advance of openings.This team continually scours all possible sources of talent, mines passive talent, and aggressively sells the employer brand to ensure that JCI has a ready supply of job candidates. ▪ Partner with academia: University partnerships are an increasingly important means of filling the STEM talent pipeline.These partnerships extend well beyond on-campus recruiting days to developing custom curricula, integrating working experience with schooling, and identifying and developing promising candidates early in their academic careers.
    13. 13. CONTINUED.. ▪ Pursue alternative sourcing: More and more manufacturers are recognizing that talent does not always need to be on the company payroll or in one of its buildings. Some are using services for sourcing and leveraging globally dispersed pockets of skilled talent. One such service is offered by InnoCentive, based in Waltham, Massachusetts. Founded in 2001, InnoCentive acts as an open innovation facilitator, providing aWeb-based platform to engage a global network of creative problem solvers to work on critical projects, as needed, for monetary rewards. ▪ Partner with outsourcing service providers: GE Healthcare, for example, has partnered with Bangalore, India-based outsourcing services provider WiproTechnologies to develop ultrasound and imaging products.The scale of the partnership extends across the value chain, including research, product development, product testing, and even sales and service for select products.This innovative partnership has enabled GE to gain access to untapped sources of talent in emerging markets and get new products to market quickly.
    14. 14. 2. Investment in global talent competencies ▪ Globalize training and development: Training—including formal classes, informal mentoring, on-the-job experiences, rotational development, special assignments, and international project experiences—is a significant element in the employee value proposition. It can also help manufacturers to develop the global workforce skills without necessarily requiring relocation or having to spend large sums on expatriate packages. ▪ Create a global knowledge management system: Knowledge management and sharing tools are fundamental to how work gets done and how innovations are leveraged and sustained in a global business environment. Cognizant, a technology solutions provider with global operations, has grown revenues 50-fold since it went public in 1998 by relentlessly perfecting its approach to knowledge management and sharing.
    15. 15. 3. The cultivation of ‘glocal’ organizational cultures, brands, and employee value propositions ▪ Sell the career and the company: One German electronics manufacturer promotes its employer brand and careers in manufacturing using a variety of tactics. For example, it starts sending a steady stream of company and career information to students in the engineering departments at target universities two years before they graduate. ▪ Create a ‘glocal’ brand: Global manufacturers must go the extra mile to tailor their branding in a way that is locally relevant and compelling. Unilever, for example, not only maintains a strong global brand, but also tailors it to the local market in India, where it operates under the name Hindustan Lever. In this way, the company achieves positive recognition as a global giant with a strong local commitment. ▪ Tailor the employee value proposition: A value proposition encompasses more than pay and benefits; it also includes the organization’s behaviors, mind-sets, norms, commitments, and informal networks. In a global company, many of these cultural elements vary with the prevalent local culture.
    16. 16. A REPORT BY DELOITTE. TALENT MANAGEMENT BY WORKFORCE PLANNING
    17. 17. REASONS FOR WORKFORCE PLANNING  Workforce planning helps companies focus on proactively understanding the future talent and business environment they need to meet future talent requirements.  In developed markets, science and engineering graduation rates are not keeping pace with baby boomer retirements.  Workforce expectations of employment are changing dramatically, jobs require more complex skill sets.  In emerging market, manufacturers have little knowledge or experience to guide their talent management decision making.
    18. 18.  In a nutshell, workforce planning can help manufacturers find people, with the right skills, in the right places, at the right time, and for the right price. Effective talent management has its roots in three principles:  Aligned talent strategy.  Effective solutions.  Supportive talent infrastructure.
    19. 19. Aligned talent strategy  The most important ways in which the workforce will contribute to the achievement of the business strategy are clearly understood.  The workforce segments and skills they need have been closely analyzed.
    20. 20. Effective solutions  Investment decisions translate into well-designed programs that can produce desired attraction, development, productivity.
    21. 21. Supportive talent infrastructure  The service delivery model, technology, knowledge and behaviors of leaders, organizational culture, and engagement of employees all directly contribute to the execution of the talent strategy and solutions.
    22. 22. Building blocks of a workforce plan in Talent Management 1. Critical workforce segments and corresponding competencies - identifying the workforce segments that create value. 2. Talent demand and supply forecasts - 3. Alignment of talent management solutions and infrastructure - Creating alignment relies on the ability of HR professionals to operate as business partners, providing skilled analysis and articulating costs and benefits.
    23. 23. Managing the Talent Crisis in Global Manufacturing- Strategies to attract and engage generation Y
    24. 24. •Depleting talent pipeline in global manufacturing •Lack of employability •China : plenty of oysters, few pearls •India: Fighting off the competition •Connecting to Gen Y •Develop-deploy-connect
    25. 25. Conclusion:  Talent management is a continuous process.  Talent management is a new rat for the hungry cats.  The application has increased in many manufacturing companies but it is a very crucial part of management.  This will able to make any organization competent, sustainable, develop leaders and many more.

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