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Confined Space Training
What is a “confined Space”? <ul><li>It must have limited openings for entry and exit </li></ul><ul><li>It must have unfavo...
OSHA definition <ul><li>“ any space having a limited means of egress, which is subject to the accumulation of toxic or fla...
Which of these is considered a confined space? <ul><li>The hold of a ship </li></ul><ul><li>A silo </li></ul><ul><li>A Tun...
Confined Space Hazards <ul><li>Oxygen Deficiency or Surplus  – Either too much oxygen or too little  </li></ul><ul><li>Tox...
Hazards (Cont.) <ul><li>Energy Hazards  – Heat, Electricity and machinery for example. Lockout/Tagout is essential for all...
Step-by-step Procedures <ul><li>Identify all confined spaces at all facilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure all employees ...
Step-by-Step (cont.) <ul><li>Make sure that all required Personal Protective Equipment (Tyvek suits, respirators, gloves, ...
Step-by-Step (cont.) <ul><li>Make sure that there is an attendant outside of the confined space at all times in order to p...
Step-by-Step (cont.) <ul><li>Establish proper communication procedures so that all workers are in constant contact with th...
Air monitoring and air quality inside a confined space <ul><li>Prior to any worker entering a confined space, the quality ...
www.nationalsafetyinc.com
Air monitoring and air quality inside a confined space (Cont.) <ul><li>If the air quality is not acceptable, ventilation s...
Air monitoring and air quality inside a confined space (Cont.) <ul><li>Once the air quality is within the acceptable range...
Protecting the openings to the confined spaces  www.nationalsafetyinc.com
Ventilating a Confined Space <ul><li>Confined Space Ventilation falls into two categories: </li></ul><ul><li>Push Ventilat...
Rescue and Retrieval <ul><li>As we have already mentioned, it is important to be able to extricate a worker should anythin...
Appendix One <ul><li>Oxygen levels and Concentration levels of typical gases potentially present in a confined space </li>...
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Confined Space Training

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A PowerPoint Presentation for use with training on Confined Space. Includes the definition of a confined space, ventilation, gas monitoring, rescue and retrieval and more.

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  • Looking for a trainer with confind space, fall protection, electrical training back ground.
    On a as needed 1099 basis
    Call 714-585-1280
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  • Covers the major points of confined space training, consider a more comprehensive online course that is 8 hours at http://confinedspacetrainingcourse.com
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  • Il me semble que Oui. L'atmosphere pourrait tres bien devenir dangereuse. Le mieux serait de le traiter comme espace clos jusqu'a preuve du contraire.
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  • dans la construction, l'ilot de puiisance, les travaux de coffrage & ferrailge da l'unité, avec l'évolution des activités est devenu fermé,avec un accés de 03 Metres de profondeur, considéron nous cet espace comme espace clos?
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Confined Space Training

  1. 1. Confined Space Training
  2. 2. What is a “confined Space”? <ul><li>It must have limited openings for entry and exit </li></ul><ul><li>It must have unfavorable natural ventilation which could contain or produce dangerous air contaminants </li></ul><ul><li>It is not intended for continuous employee occupancy. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  3. 3. OSHA definition <ul><li>“ any space having a limited means of egress, which is subject to the accumulation of toxic or flammable contaminants or has an oxygen deficient atmosphere. Confined or enclosed spaces include, but are not limited to, storage to, storage tanks, process vessels, bins, boilers, ventilation or exhaust ducts, sewers, underground utility vaults, tunnels, pipelines, and open top spaces more than 4 feet deep such as pits, tubs, vaults, and vessels.&quot; </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  4. 4. Which of these is considered a confined space? <ul><li>The hold of a ship </li></ul><ul><li>A silo </li></ul><ul><li>A Tunnel </li></ul><ul><li>A manhole </li></ul><ul><li>A cold storage freezer </li></ul><ul><li>An open ditch </li></ul><ul><li>A bank vault </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  5. 5. Confined Space Hazards <ul><li>Oxygen Deficiency or Surplus – Either too much oxygen or too little </li></ul><ul><li>Toxic Gases, Vapors or Fumes – Hydrogen Sulfide, Carbon Monoxide, etc… </li></ul><ul><li>Flammable/Explosives Hazards – This can include gases and vapors but may also include dust and particulates when they are in concentration large enough to ignite </li></ul><ul><li>Engulfment – Grain, dirt, liquids, etc… that have the potential of burying a person </li></ul><ul><li>The Nature and configuration of the space – Sloping walls or floors that may trap someone </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  6. 6. Hazards (Cont.) <ul><li>Energy Hazards – Heat, Electricity and machinery for example. Lockout/Tagout is essential for all energy sources that have the potential for harm or death. </li></ul><ul><li>Noise – Confined Spaces may amplify noise. Proper hearing protection should be provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Falling objects – Especially with an attendant overhead, with other workers possibly working above, etc… proper precautions should be taken and hard hats should be worn. </li></ul><ul><li>Critters – Pits, pipes and trenches tend to attract snakes, rates, scorpions and other potentially dangerous animals and insects. </li></ul><ul><li>Psychological – Includes claustrophobia, fear of isolation, fear of the dark, panic disorders, etc… </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  7. 7. Step-by-step Procedures <ul><li>Identify all confined spaces at all facilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure all employees and personnel know what areas are considered confined spaces and make sure that they are clearly labeled as such by posting the appropriate signs. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify all personnel who will be authorized to enter the confined spaces and train them in all the procedures inherent in confined space work. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  8. 8. Step-by-Step (cont.) <ul><li>Make sure that all required Personal Protective Equipment (Tyvek suits, respirators, gloves, etc…) are in stock and available for all authorized personnel when they should need it. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for and have available all rescue and retrieval equipment necessary for getting worker(s) out of the confined space (conscious or unconscious) if the need should arise. </li></ul><ul><li>Measure and monitor the air quality inside the confined space before entry and at all times while work is being done inside the confined space using gas monitors. Use ventilation and blowers if necessary to maintain the quality of the air. If the air quality cannot be improved then the confined space should be considered Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) and the appropriate respirator should be used at all time by all workers while in the confined space. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  9. 9. Step-by-Step (cont.) <ul><li>Make sure that there is an attendant outside of the confined space at all times in order to provide rescue and retrieval if needed. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure that the confined space entry permit is properly and completely filled out and signed by the entry supervisor prior to entry by any personnel. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  10. 10. Step-by-Step (cont.) <ul><li>Establish proper communication procedures so that all workers are in constant contact with the attendant(s) outside the confined space. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify, implement and monitor all lockout procedures both inside the confined space as well as those outside the confined space that could potentially have an effect on the conditions inside the confined space and/or on the attendant(s) outside the confined space. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  11. 11. Air monitoring and air quality inside a confined space <ul><li>Prior to any worker entering a confined space, the quality of the air must be determined. This is most often done using a confined space air monitor that measures H 2 S, CO, LEL and O 2 . Additionally, if there is reason to suspect some other type of gas (ammonia in food processing plants, for example) then steps should be put in place to make sure to monitor for those as well. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  12. 12. www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  13. 13. Air monitoring and air quality inside a confined space (Cont.) <ul><li>If the air quality is not acceptable, ventilation should be used to circulate the bad air out and to bring in breathable air. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  14. 14. Air monitoring and air quality inside a confined space (Cont.) <ul><li>Once the air quality is within the acceptable range, workers may enter the confined space to do the required work. Continued monitoring of the air quality is required for as long as there is still anyone inside the confined space as air quality can change at any time. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  15. 15. Protecting the openings to the confined spaces www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  16. 16. Ventilating a Confined Space <ul><li>Confined Space Ventilation falls into two categories: </li></ul><ul><li>Push Ventilation – This is when fresh air is blown (pushed) into a confined space </li></ul><ul><li>Pull Ventilation – This is when the bad air is “sucked” out of the confined Space </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  17. 17. Rescue and Retrieval <ul><li>As we have already mentioned, it is important to be able to extricate a worker should anything happen. Depending on the nature of the confined space this can be somewhat difficult to plan for. For simple overhead entries, there are several harnesses available with shoulder D-rings that, combined with a Y-Lanyard designed for rescue and retrieval make it simpler to pull out a fallen worker. </li></ul><ul><li>There are also a number of great systems that allow for easy set-up and use for getting wenches and Self-Retracting Lifelines in place to aid in the retrieval and rescue. </li></ul><ul><li>Tripods have been most commonly used for many years and are still used by some. </li></ul><ul><li>Other systems, such as the UCL 5-piece are simple to put together and get in place. It allows for the attachment of a retrieval wench as well as a backup SRL. </li></ul><ul><li>UCL also makes a side-entry system as well as a great number of other systems. </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com
  18. 18. Appendix One <ul><li>Oxygen levels and Concentration levels of typical gases potentially present in a confined space </li></ul><ul><li>Contaminant Alarm Concentrations </li></ul><ul><li>Oxygen <19.5% or >23% </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon Monoxide 35 ppm </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon Dioxide 5000 ppm </li></ul><ul><li>H 2 S 10 ppm </li></ul><ul><li>Nitrogen Dioxide 3.0 ppm </li></ul><ul><li>Chlorine 0.5 ppm </li></ul><ul><li>Methane >10% LEL </li></ul><ul><li>Ozone 0.1 ppm </li></ul><ul><li>Combustible Gases 10% LEL </li></ul><ul><li>Particulates >10% LEL </li></ul>www.nationalsafetyinc.com

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