Perfect Progressive Tenses

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Perfect Progressive Tenses

  1. 1. oPast Perfect Continuous Tense Present Perfect Continuous Tense Future Perfect Continuous Tense
  2. 2. Past Perfect Continuous Tense Subject + auxiliary verb HAVE + auxiliary verb BE + main verb Conjugated in simple past tense past participle present participle had been base + ing Examples: • You had been waiting there for more than two hours when she finally arrived. (positive) • Had you been waiting there for more than two hours when she finally arrived? (question) • You had not been waiting there for more than two hours when she finally arrived. (negative)
  3. 3. Duration Before Something in the Past Cause of Something in the Past
  4. 4. Duration Before Something in the Past • We use the Past Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and continued up until another time in the past.
  5. 5. Examples: • They had been talking for over an hour before Tony arrived. • She had been working at that company for three years when it went out of business. • How long had you been waiting to get on the bus? • Mike wanted to sit down because he had been standing all day at work. • James had been teaching at the university for more than a year before he left for Asia. • How long had you been studying Turkish?
  6. 6. Cause of Something in the Past  Using the Past Perfect Continuous before another action in the past is a good way to show cause and effect.
  7. 7. Examples: • Jason was tired because he had been jogging. • I could smell cigarettes. Somebody had been smoking. • Jenny gained weight because he had been overeating. • Betty failed the final test because she had not been attending class. • Had the pilot been drinking before the crash?
  8. 8. Present Perfect Continuous Tense Subject + Auxiliary Verb + Auxiliary Verb + Main verb have been base + ing has Example: • You have been waiting here for two hours. (positive) • Have you been waiting here for two hours? (question) • You have not been waiting here for two hours. (negative)
  9. 9. Duration FROM THE PAST UNTIL NOW Recently, lately
  10. 10. Duration FROM THE PAST UNTIL NOW  We use the Present Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and has continued up until now.
  11. 11. Examples: • They have been talking for the last hour. • She has been working at that company for three years. • What have you been doing for the last 30 minutes? • James has been teaching at the university since June. • We have been waiting here for over two hours! • Why has Nancy not been taking her medicine for the last three days?
  12. 12. Recently, lately  You can also use the Present Perfect Continuous WITHOUT a duration such as "for two weeks." Without the duration, the tense has a more general meaning of "lately." We often use the words "lately" or "recently" to emphasize this meaning.
  13. 13. Examples: • Recently, I have been feeling really tired. • She has been watching too much television lately. • Have you been exercising lately? • Mary has been feeling a little depressed. • Lisa has not been practicing her English. • What have you been doing?
  14. 14. Future Perfect Continuous Tense subject + Auxiliary verb WILL + Auxiliary verb HAVE + Auxiliary verb BE + Main verb will have past participle base + ing am/is/are going to have been present participle Example: • You will have been travelling for two days. (positive) • Will you have been playing football? (question) • She will not have been using the car. (negative) • You are going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives. (positive) • Are you going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives? (question) • You are not going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives. (negative)
  15. 15. Duration before something in the future Cause of Something in the future
  16. 16. Duration before something in the future  We use the Future Perfect Continuous to show that something will continue up until a particular event or time in the future.
  17. 17. Examples: • They will have been talking for over an hour by the time Thomas arrives. • She is going to have been working at that company for three years when it finally closes. • James will have been teaching at the university for more than a year by the time he leaves for Asia. • How long will you have been studying when you graduate? • We are going to have been driving for over three days straight when we get to Anchorage. • A: When you finish your English course, will you have been living in New Zealand for over a year? B: No, I will not have been living here that long.
  18. 18. CAUSE Of something in the future  Using the Future Perfect Continuous before another action in the future is a good way to show cause and effect.
  19. 19. Examples: • Jason will be tired when he gets home because he will have been jogging for over an hour. • Claudia's English will be perfect when she returns to Germany because she is going to have been studying English in the United States for over two years.

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